Discussion:
Tux and Cookie
(too old to reply)
MC
2009-10-24 12:37:51 UTC
Permalink
I grew up in England (Birmingham and the West Midlands) and crossed the
pond in 1972.

I now observe BrE from afar, and my main sources are newspapers, radio,
TV and film and I've been reading and hearing "tux" and "cookie" used
pretty widely of late.

I don't remember coming across either in BrE when I lived there. It was
"dinner jacket" or the less direct "black tie" and "biscuit."

Are they recent imports or have they been kicking around for longer than
I think?
--
"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2009-10-24 13:04:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by MC
I grew up in England (Birmingham and the West Midlands) and crossed the
pond in 1972.
I now observe BrE from afar, and my main sources are newspapers, radio,
TV and film and I've been reading and hearing "tux" and "cookie" used
pretty widely of late.
I don't remember coming across either in BrE when I lived there. It was
"dinner jacket" or the less direct "black tie" and "biscuit."
Are they recent imports or have they been kicking around for longer than
I think?
In BrE "cookie" is used of a certain style of biscuit (BrE), in
particular "chocolate chip cookies". It is not a generic term for all
biscuits.

Here are two:
Loading Image...

They are not soft and not hard, but in between.

One brand is:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Cookies
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Dr Peter Young
2009-10-24 13:46:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by MC
I grew up in England (Birmingham and the West Midlands) and crossed the
pond in 1972.
I now observe BrE from afar, and my main sources are newspapers, radio,
TV and film and I've been reading and hearing "tux" and "cookie" used
pretty widely of late.
I don't remember coming across either in BrE when I lived there. It was
"dinner jacket" or the less direct "black tie" and "biscuit."
Are they recent imports or have they been kicking around for longer than
I think?
In BrE "cookie" is used of a certain style of biscuit (BrE), in
particular "chocolate chip cookies". It is not a generic term for all
biscuits.
http://www.nicecupofteaandasitdown.com/biscuits/media/chocchips.jpg
They are not soft and not hard, but in between.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Cookies
Also one of our favourites, Anzac Cookies, though Wikipedia insists
that they are called biscuits:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANZAC_biscuit

Not in this house, they aren't!

I think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by now; also,
"limousine", which hitherto had been used for any of what we call a
saloon car, now has mostly taken on the Leftpondian meaning of what
was formerly called a "stretch limo".

With best wishes,

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Attending Anesthesiologist)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
MC
2009-10-24 14:03:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
--
"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
Nick
2009-10-24 14:30:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by MC
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
It seems to me that those of us who park our car at the railway station
will wear a DJ when necessary. Those who park up at the train station
will wear a tux.

As distinct from having one as a logo on their computer, of course.
--
Online waterways route planner: http://canalplan.org.uk
development version: http://canalplan.eu
James Silverton
2009-10-24 14:42:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick
Post by MC
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by
now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
It seems to me that those of us who park our car at the
railway station will wear a DJ when necessary. Those who park
up at the train station will wear a tux.
Do British computers and web sites set cookies?
--
James Silverton
Potomac, Maryland

Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not
Dr Peter Young
2009-10-24 14:58:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Post by Nick
Post by MC
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by
now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
It seems to me that those of us who park our car at the
railway station will wear a DJ when necessary. Those who park
up at the train station will wear a tux.
Do British computers and web sites set cookies?
Yes.

With best wishes,

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Attending Anesthesiologist)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Robert Bannister
2009-10-24 23:23:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Post by Nick
Post by MC
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by
now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
It seems to me that those of us who park our car at the
railway station will wear a DJ when necessary. Those who park
up at the train station will wear a tux.
Do British computers and web sites set cookies?
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
--
Rob Bannister
Mark Brader
2009-10-25 03:22:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
--
Mark Brader | "One of the lessons of history is that nothing
Toronto | is often a good thing to do and always a clever
***@vex.net | thing to say." -- Will Durant
Nick
2009-10-25 08:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
Are there any unique spellings (as distinct from words or idioms or
meanings) in Englishes that are neither American or English?

If we call the spellings that exist in AmE "version-1" and those in BrE
"version-2", then AmE [nearly] always uses version 1. BrE nearly always
uses version-2. Canadian I know uses some of both. But does it have
any "version-3" ones?
--
Online waterways route planner: http://canalplan.org.uk
development version: http://canalplan.eu
the Omrud
2009-10-25 08:17:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
Are there any unique spellings (as distinct from words or idioms or
meanings) in Englishes that are neither American or English?
If we call the spellings that exist in AmE "version-1" and those in BrE
"version-2", then AmE [nearly] always uses version 1. BrE nearly always
uses version-2. Canadian I know uses some of both. But does it have
any "version-3" ones?
The children at the school where Daughter is now teaching maths don't
seem to conform to either set.
--
David
R H Draney
2009-10-25 16:52:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
Are there any unique spellings (as distinct from words or idioms or
meanings) in Englishes that are neither American or English?
If we call the spellings that exist in AmE "version-1" and those in BrE
"version-2", then AmE [nearly] always uses version 1. BrE nearly always
uses version-2. Canadian I know uses some of both. But does it have
any "version-3" ones?
Most of the Canadians I know use version 1.5; little bit o'dis, little bit
o'dat....r
--
A pessimist sees the glass as half empty.
An optometrist asks whether you see the glass
more full like this?...or like this?
MC
2009-10-25 19:14:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Most of the Canadians I know use version 1.5; little bit o'dis, little bit
o'dat....r
eggzackerly
--
"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
Chuck Riggs
2009-10-25 14:54:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
You're not pleased that someone called CanE normal, non-American
English?
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs,
who speaks AmE, lives near Dublin, Ireland,usually spells in BrE
and hasn't corrected his email address yet
Adam Funk
2009-10-25 15:39:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
I was under the impression that a lot of Canadians like to have
distinguishing non-American features; for example, I've heard that
"zed" has been on the rise against "zee" (Z) lately.
--
Their tags shall blink until the end of days.
BoM 12:10
MC
2009-10-25 19:14:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
I was under the impression that a lot of Canadians like to have
distinguishing non-American features; for example, I've heard that
"zed" has been on the rise against "zee" (Z) lately.
Nothing "lately" about it. It's been current and standard CdnE forever.

Most "-or" vs. "-our" words opt for "-our" most of the time. Less so the
farther west you go, andoften it's dictated by the house style of
newspapers and magazines - which favor, erm... favour the US spelling
because that's the way most wire service stories come in.
--
"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
HVS
2009-10-25 21:38:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by MC
Post by Adam Funk
I was under the impression that a lot of Canadians like to have
distinguishing non-American features; for example, I've heard
that "zed" has been on the rise against "zee" (Z) lately.
Nothing "lately" about it. It's been current and standard CdnE
forever.
Yup; I certainly never heard "zee" from anyone other than an
American during my Canadian life (1952-82).
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
Roland Hutchinson
2009-10-25 22:14:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by MC
Post by Adam Funk
I was under the impression that a lot of Canadians like to have
distinguishing non-American features; for example, I've heard that
"zed" has been on the rise against "zee" (Z) lately.
Nothing "lately" about it. It's been current and standard CdnE forever.
Yup; I certainly never heard "zee" from anyone other than an American
during my Canadian life (1952-82).
Nor I during my American life (to date).
--
Roland Hutchinson

He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba,"
... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy.
--Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( http://tinyurl.com/RolandIsNJ )
Chuck Riggs
2009-10-26 14:58:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by MC
Post by Adam Funk
I was under the impression that a lot of Canadians like to have
distinguishing non-American features; for example, I've heard
that "zed" has been on the rise against "zee" (Z) lately.
Nothing "lately" about it. It's been current and standard CdnE forever.
Yup; I certainly never heard "zee" from anyone other than an
American during my Canadian life (1952-82).
Which was similar, I presume, to life as Canadians know it. Welcome
back to the world of the living.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs,
who speaks AmE, lives near Dublin, Ireland,usually spells in BrE
and hasn't corrected his email address yet
HVS
2009-10-26 15:21:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Oct 2009 21:38:48 GMT, HVS
Post by HVS
Post by MC
Post by Adam Funk
I was under the impression that a lot of Canadians like to
have distinguishing non-American features; for example, I've
heard that "zed" has been on the rise against "zee" (Z)
lately.
Nothing "lately" about it. It's been current and standard CdnE forever.
Yup; I certainly never heard "zee" from anyone other than an
American during my Canadian life (1952-82).
Which was similar, I presume, to life as Canadians know it.
That's precisely what I didn't wish to presume -- it would indeed
be presumptuous for me to assume that Canadian life and language as
I "knew" it prior to 1982 is what Canadians still "know", 27 years
later.
Welcome back to the world of the living.
Yeah, I didn't like that phrasing, but I had trouble finding a
concise way of saying it.

"During the years I lived in Canada", "during my Canadian years",
and "in the 30 years I spent in Canada" all make it sound like I
was born somewhere else, moved there for that period of time, and
then moved back out of the country.

"During my first 30 years in Canada" makes it sound like there were
(or might be) more years after that. "From my birth in 1952 until
I left Canada 30 years later" seems a overly biographical for a
simple comment.

So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the years I
lived in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth until
1982]" -- without writing all those words?
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
Roland Hutchinson
2009-10-26 17:47:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
Post by MC
Post by Adam Funk
I was under the impression that a lot of Canadians like to have
distinguishing non-American features; for example, I've heard that
"zed" has been on the rise against "zee" (Z) lately.
Nothing "lately" about it. It's been current and standard CdnE forever.
Yup; I certainly never heard "zee" from anyone other than an American
during my Canadian life (1952-82).
Which was similar, I presume, to life as Canadians know it.
That's precisely what I didn't wish to presume -- it would indeed be
presumptuous for me to assume that Canadian life and language as I
"knew" it prior to 1982 is what Canadians still "know", 27 years later.
Post by Chuck Riggs
Welcome back to the world of the living.
Yeah, I didn't like that phrasing, but I had trouble finding a concise
way of saying it.
"During the years I lived in Canada", "during my Canadian years", and
"in the 30 years I spent in Canada" all make it sound like I was born
somewhere else, moved there for that period of time, and then moved back
out of the country.
"During my first 30 years in Canada" makes it sound like there were (or
might be) more years after that. "From my birth in 1952 until I left
Canada 30 years later" seems a overly biographical for a simple comment.
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the years I lived
in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth until 1982]" -- without
writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30" be at all
helpful?
--
Roland Hutchinson

He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba,"
... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy.
--Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( http://tinyurl.com/RolandIsNJ )
HVS
2009-10-26 18:04:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the years
I lived in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth until
1982]" -- without writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30" be at
all helpful?
Yes, quite possibly -- but I'm not entirely certain that it would
automatically imply that I'd been there for the whole of the previous
30 years, and that I've not lived there since.

I view my time as an active Canadian -- from birth to age 30 -- as
something of a done-and-dusted bit of my life; it's something I used
to be.

And although I've certainly not become English or British, I think
I've been "not really a Canadian any more" for some years now.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
Roland Hutchinson
2009-10-26 19:27:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the years I lived
in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth until 1982]" --
without writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30" be at all
helpful?
Yes, quite possibly -- but I'm not entirely certain that it would
automatically imply that I'd been there for the whole of the previous 30
years, and that I've not lived there since.
I view my time as an active Canadian -- from birth to age 30 -- as
something of a done-and-dusted bit of my life; it's something I used to
be.
And although I've certainly not become English or British, I think I've
been "not really a Canadian any more" for some years now.
My final attempt, I think: "I never head that before I left my native
Canada (for the first time), at age 30."

Admittedly, that's starting to get wordy again...
--
Roland Hutchinson

He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba,"
... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy.
--Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( http://tinyurl.com/RolandIsNJ )
HVS
2009-10-26 19:58:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the
years I lived in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth
until 1982]" -- without writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30" be
at all helpful?
Yes, quite possibly -- but I'm not entirely certain that it
would automatically imply that I'd been there for the whole of
the previous 30 years, and that I've not lived there since.
I view my time as an active Canadian -- from birth to age 30 --
as something of a done-and-dusted bit of my life; it's
something I used to be.
And although I've certainly not become English or British, I
think I've been "not really a Canadian any more" for some years
now.
My final attempt, I think: "I never head that before I left my
native Canada (for the first time), at age 30."
Yes, that probably covers it (except that I'd been out of the
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Admittedly, that's starting to get wordy again...
Yup. (Tricky one, I found it to be, and in spite of Chuck's
reservations I may still refer to it as "my Canadian life".)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
Chuck Riggs
2009-10-27 14:20:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the
years I lived in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth
until 1982]" -- without writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30" be
at all helpful?
Yes, quite possibly -- but I'm not entirely certain that it
would automatically imply that I'd been there for the whole of
the previous 30 years, and that I've not lived there since.
I view my time as an active Canadian -- from birth to age 30 --
as something of a done-and-dusted bit of my life; it's
something I used to be.
And although I've certainly not become English or British, I
think I've been "not really a Canadian any more" for some years
now.
My final attempt, I think: "I never head that before I left my
native Canada (for the first time), at age 30."
Yes, that probably covers it (except that I'd been out of the
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Admittedly, that's starting to get wordy again...
Yup. (Tricky one, I found it to be, and in spite of Chuck's
reservations I may still refer to it as "my Canadian life".)
When I lived in Bangor, Maine, the natives' impression of the
Canadians who poured over the border to get good deals at the Bangor
Mall, sometimes wearing their purchases when crossing back, to avoid
customs, seemed to be that they lacked a life. But then, it seems that
tourists never get the respect they deserve, no matter where.
Since I was "from away", having not been born in the state, they kept
me at a distance. Still, I think I gained some insight into the Mainer
psyche in my ten years there. Wonderful people, IMO, even with their
insularity and meanness with the language, and as honest and
hard-working as anyone I have met.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs,
An American who lives near Dublin, Ireland and usually spells in BrE
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2009-10-26 21:36:55 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 19:27:29 +0000 (UTC), Roland Hutchinson
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the years I lived
in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth until 1982]" --
without writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30" be at all
helpful?
Yes, quite possibly -- but I'm not entirely certain that it would
automatically imply that I'd been there for the whole of the previous 30
years, and that I've not lived there since.
I view my time as an active Canadian -- from birth to age 30 -- as
something of a done-and-dusted bit of my life; it's something I used to
be.
And although I've certainly not become English or British, I think I've
been "not really a Canadian any more" for some years now.
My final attempt, I think: "I never head that before I left my native
Canada (for the first time), at age 30."
Admittedly, that's starting to get wordy again...
"I never heard that before I left my native Canada to live in Britain,
at age 30."

It could also be worded using "migrated".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
HVS
2009-10-26 21:48:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
"I never heard that before I left my native Canada to live in
Britain, at age 30."
It could also be worded using "migrated".
Sliding sideways...a note on nuances and the acceptability of terms.

I knew in 1982 that what I was doing was emigrating -- it was a
permanent move to the UK[1], not just a trial or a few years of
living abroad -- but that concept was definitely touchy for many
people I knew, and I didn't actually use the word in public at the
time.

[1] England, actually. I live in Britain, but I definitely moved to
England.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
Roland Hutchinson
2009-10-26 23:44:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 19:27:29 +0000 (UTC), Roland Hutchinson
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the years I
lived in Canada, which was for 30 years from my birth until 1982]"
-- without writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30" be at all
helpful?
Yes, quite possibly -- but I'm not entirely certain that it would
automatically imply that I'd been there for the whole of the previous
30 years, and that I've not lived there since.
I view my time as an active Canadian -- from birth to age 30 -- as
something of a done-and-dusted bit of my life; it's something I used
to be.
And although I've certainly not become English or British, I think
I've been "not really a Canadian any more" for some years now.
My final attempt, I think: "I never head that before I left my native
Canada (for the first time), at age 30."
Admittedly, that's starting to get wordy again...
"I never heard that before I left my native Canada to live in Britain,
at age 30."
Very nice improvement, that.
--
Roland Hutchinson

He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba,"
... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy.
--Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( http://tinyurl.com/RolandIsNJ )
HVS
2009-10-27 07:51:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 19:27:29 +0000 (UTC), Roland Hutchinson
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by HVS
So: how would you write "I didn't hear that [during the
years I lived in Canada, which was for 30 years from my
birth until 1982]" -- without writing all those words?
Would "I never heard that before I left Canada, at age 30"
be at all helpful?
Yes, quite possibly -- but I'm not entirely certain that it
would automatically imply that I'd been there for the whole
of the previous 30 years, and that I've not lived there
since.
I view my time as an active Canadian -- from birth to age 30
-- as something of a done-and-dusted bit of my life; it's
something I used to be.
And although I've certainly not become English or British, I
think I've been "not really a Canadian any more" for some
years now.
My final attempt, I think: "I never head that before I left my
native Canada (for the first time), at age 30."
Admittedly, that's starting to get wordy again...
"I never heard that before I left my native Canada to live in
Britain, at age 30."
Very nice improvement, that.
Except that I *had* heard it -- long before that; just not from a
Canadian.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
John Holmes
2009-11-02 10:03:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
"I never heard that before I left my native Canada to live in
Britain, at age 30."
Very nice improvement, that.
Don't be nasty, Roland. I've heard Canada's not all that bad.
--
Regards
John
for mail: my initials plus a u e
at tpg dot com dot au
Dr Peter Young
2009-11-02 11:15:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Holmes
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
"I never heard that before I left my native Canada to live in
Britain, at age 30."
Very nice improvement, that.
Don't be nasty, Roland. I've heard Canada's not all that bad.
As I keep reminding my brother, now a Canadian citizen, "Canada could
have had British government, French culture and American know-how.
Instead, it has French government, American culture, and British
know-how.

With best wishes,

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Attending Anesthesiologist)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Mark Brader
2009-11-03 05:39:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr Peter Young
As I keep reminding my brother, now a Canadian citizen, "Canada could
have had British government, French culture and American know-how.
Instead, it has French government, American culture, and British
know-how.
" -- John Robert Colombo (slightly misquoted).
--
Mark Brader "You can't [compare] computer memory and recall
Toronto with human memory and recall. It's comparing
***@vex.net apples and bicycles." -- Ed Knowles
Chuck Riggs
2009-11-02 12:24:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Holmes
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
"I never heard that before I left my native Canada to live in
Britain, at age 30."
Very nice improvement, that.
Don't be nasty, Roland. I've heard Canada's not all that bad.
But how good is it?
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs,
An American who lives near Dublin, Ireland and usually spells in BrE
Robert Bannister
2009-10-26 00:52:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
Er... which continent is Canada in?
--
Rob Bannister
Roland Hutchinson
2009-10-26 01:00:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
Er... which continent is Canada in?
Oh, dear, we're going to have another "count the continents" go-round.

Canada is in North America, one of the seven continents (as they are
currently arranged).
--
Roland Hutchinson

He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba,"
... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy.
--Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( http://tinyurl.com/RolandIsNJ )
R H Draney
2009-10-26 04:12:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Robert Bannister
Er... which continent is Canada in?
Oh, dear, we're going to have another "count the continents" go-round.
Canada is in North America, one of the seven continents (as they are
currently arranged).
Seven?...did they finally get around to digging that canal along the Urals?...r
--
A pessimist sees the glass as half empty.
An optometrist asks whether you see the glass
more full like this?...or like this?
Roland Hutchinson
2009-10-26 17:45:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Robert Bannister
Er... which continent is Canada in?
Oh, dear, we're going to have another "count the continents" go-round.
Canada is in North America, one of the seven continents (as they are
currently arranged).
Seven?...did they finally get around to digging that canal along the Urals?...r
By ancient convention, we count as though the twain had never met.
--
Roland Hutchinson

He calls himself "the Garden State's leading violist da gamba,"
... comparable to being ruler of an exceptionally small duchy.
--Newark (NJ) Star Ledger ( http://tinyurl.com/RolandIsNJ )
Mark Brader
2009-10-26 03:22:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mark Brader
...entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
Er... which continent is Canada in?
Er... why are you asking about continents?

*NO, DON'T ANSWER THAT!*
--
Mark Brader | "I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did.
Toronto | I said I didn't know."
***@vex.net | --Mark Twain, "Life on the Mississippi"
Chuck Riggs
2009-10-26 15:02:13 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 26 Oct 2009 08:52:02 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Robert Bannister
This is akin to the spelling of "program" - it is computer language,
entirely separate from normal non-American English.
I get really tired of people thinking that all "non-Americans" use
British spelling.
Er... which continent is Canada in?
The man said non-Americans, not non-North Americans.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs,
who speaks AmE, lives near Dublin, Ireland,usually spells in BrE
and hasn't corrected his email address yet
Jonathan Morton
2009-10-24 17:28:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nick
Post by MC
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
It seems to me that those of us who park our car at the railway station
will wear a DJ when necessary. Those who park up at the train station
will wear a tux.
And those of us who park at the station wear black tie.

Regards

Jonathan
Don Phillipson
2009-10-24 15:30:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by MC
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuxedo_(clothing) suggests that,
if so, this would only be fair, so far as this costume first became
generally popular at the Tuxedo Park Club (variously located in
New York City or Cleveland, Ohio) in the late 19th century,
although supposedly created for the Prince of Wales (Edward VII)
as an alternative to the "boiled shirt" evening dress of his day.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Mike Lyle
2009-10-26 20:22:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by MC
Post by Dr Peter Young
think "tux" has pretty well got naturalised into BrE by now;
Is it superseding "dinner jacket"?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuxedo_(clothing) suggests that,
if so, this would only be fair, so far as this costume first became
generally popular at the Tuxedo Park Club (variously located in
New York City or Cleveland, Ohio) in the late 19th century,
although supposedly created for the Prince of Wales (Edward VII)
as an alternative to the "boiled shirt" evening dress of his day.
Nonetheless, I've been told (perhaps wrongly) that it was Beau Brummel
who fixed the black-and-white thing.
--
Mike.
Peter Moylan
2009-10-24 23:57:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr Peter Young
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
In BrE "cookie" is used of a certain style of biscuit (BrE), in
particular "chocolate chip cookies". It is not a generic term for all
biscuits.
http://www.nicecupofteaandasitdown.com/biscuits/media/chocchips.jpg
They are not soft and not hard, but in between.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Cookies
Also one of our favourites, Anzac Cookies, though Wikipedia insists
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANZAC_biscuit
Not in this house, they aren't!
They're still Anzac biscuits here in Oz. "Cookies" is seen (and, much
less often, heard) sometimes in this country, but it's sufficiently rare
that it still makes me think of Sesame Street. The word "cookies" can be
read on some packets on the supermarket shelves, but anyone picking them
up would call them a packet of biscuits.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Ray O'Hara
2009-10-25 04:25:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
In BrE "cookie" is used of a certain style of biscuit (BrE), in
particular "chocolate chip cookies". It is not a generic term for all
biscuits.
http://www.nicecupofteaandasitdown.com/biscuits/media/chocchips.jpg
They are not soft and not hard, but in between.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland_Cookies
Also one of our favourites, Anzac Cookies, though Wikipedia insists that
they are called biscuits: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ANZAC_biscuit
Not in this house, they aren't!
They're still Anzac biscuits here in Oz. "Cookies" is seen (and, much less
often, heard) sometimes in this country, but it's sufficiently rare that
it still makes me think of Sesame Street. The word "cookies" can be read
on some packets on the supermarket shelves, but anyone picking them up
would call them a packet of biscuits.
Cookie is a word adopted from the Dutch who originaly settled New York.
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