Discussion:
compared to
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a***@gmail.com
2019-01-19 16:51:42 UTC
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1) A and B are very similar compared to C.
2) A is very similar compared to C.

Are these sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
What -if anything- do they mean?

I think '2' is an awkward attempt to say:
3) A is very similar to C.

but is actually meaningless.

I think '1' would mean A and B are not similar as such, but if you compare
them to C, you'll find that they are similar.

Gratefully,
Navi
bert
2019-01-19 17:03:36 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) A and B are very similar compared to C.
I think '1' would mean A and B are not similar
as such, but if you compare them to C, you'll
find that they are similar.
Yes, but it's a non-idiomatic way to say:
A and B are very similar in comparison to/with C.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-19 18:08:16 UTC
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Post by bert
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) A and B are very similar compared to C.
I think '1' would mean A and B are not similar
as such, but if you compare them to C, you'll
find that they are similar.
A and B are very similar in comparison to/with C.
If you want to be clear you need to say something like "A and B
resemble one another more than either resembles C" (assuming that's
what navi wants it to mean). But there is still the question of what
property you're comparing. If you say "Spanish and Portuguese resemble
one another more than either resembles Russian or Basque" then that's
OK if you're talking about what they look like on the printed page, but
not if you're talking about how they sound to people who don't
understand any of them. Then you'd say "Spanish and Basque resemble one
another more than either resembles Portuguese", or "Portuguese and
Russian resemble one another more than either resembles Spanish".
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-19 17:15:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) A and B are very similar compared to C.
2) A is very similar compared to C.
Are these sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
What -if anything- do they mean?
3) A is very similar to C.
but is actually meaningless.
That depends on your definition of "meaningless". The meaning is clear,
though I'd never say it with "compared".

A look at Google suggests that "similar compared to" often means
"similar to that of" or some such. For instance, "The results showed
that fermentation and flavor formation were very similar compared to a
traditional batch process, although the process time was reduced to ..."

That is, fermentation and flavor formation were similar to those
produced in a traditional batch process.

https://books.google.com/books?id=llDOBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA172-IA13
Post by a***@gmail.com
I think '1' would mean A and B are not similar as such, but if you compare
them to C, you'll find that they are similar.
It probably could mean that, though it's a rather odd statement. Mozart
and Wagner are similar compared to Cage?
--
Jerry Friedman
Rich Ulrich
2019-01-19 18:48:41 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 19 Jan 2019 10:15:07 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) A and B are very similar compared to C.
2) A is very similar compared to C.
Are these sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
What -if anything- do they mean?
3) A is very similar to C.
but is actually meaningless.
That depends on your definition of "meaningless". The meaning is clear,
though I'd never say it with "compared".
I think the writer wants to be a little less terse than
the statements without "compared". But the way
the word is used is not good.

What I like better might be something like, "compared on
external [or important] features..." - either as a parenthetical
expression, or to start each sentence.
Post by Jerry Friedman
A look at Google suggests that "similar compared to" often means
"similar to that of" or some such. For instance, "The results showed
that fermentation and flavor formation were very similar compared to a
traditional batch process, although the process time was reduced to ..."
That is, fermentation and flavor formation were similar to those
produced in a traditional batch process.
https://books.google.com/books?id=llDOBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA172-IA13
Post by a***@gmail.com
I think '1' would mean A and B are not similar as such, but if you compare
them to C, you'll find that they are similar.
It probably could mean that, though it's a rather odd statement. Mozart
and Wagner are similar compared to Cage?
That would be my gross assessment. But it's an odd statement
unless there is further context.
--
Rich Ulrich
Jack
2019-01-19 23:00:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) A and B are very similar compared to C.
2) A is very similar compared to C.
Are these sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
What -if anything- do they mean?
3) A is very similar to C.
but is actually meaningless.
Yes. It makes me want to ask 'similar to what?' and 'what do you mean,
compared to C?'
Post by a***@gmail.com
I think '1' would mean A and B are not similar as such, but if you compare
them to C, you'll find that they are similar.
1) introduces three elements (A, B, and C), a relationship
(similiarity), and a process (comparison), without making clear what
is being said about what, or

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