Discussion:
Original meaning of HEATHEN?
(too old to reply)
Dingbat
2020-01-12 09:23:07 UTC
Permalink
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?



On Thursday, January 9, 2020 at 2:42:29 PM UTC+5:30, lawrey wrote:

      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying districts.


I responded:

I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.

heath
/hiːθ/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse grasses.
Paul Wolff
2020-01-12 11:00:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn
comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of
town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying
districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something
like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to
afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hi0 >> noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and
coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity had
been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
Greek Khaideinoi a people of W. Scandinavia (Ptolemy) according to those
folk at Oxford - though I'm sure they wouldn't swear that it's a
definitive answer - though it is incidentally possible.
--
Paul
Ross
2020-01-12 11:28:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn
comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of
town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying
districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something
like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to
afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hi0 >> noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and
coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity had
been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
Greek Khaideinoi a people of W. Scandinavia (Ptolemy) according to those
folk at Oxford - though I'm sure they wouldn't swear that it's a
definitive answer - though it is incidentally possible.
--
Paul
Or...
OED mentions an alternative proposed by Bugge,
with Go *haiþans < Gk Greek ἔθνος ‘nation’, (plural) ‘nations, Gentiles, heathens’, via Armenian het'anos.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-12 11:34:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn>
comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of>
town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying>
districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something>
like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to>
afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hi0 >> noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid>
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and>
coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity
had> >been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
Greek Khaideinoi a people of W. Scandinavia (Ptolemy) according to
those> folk at Oxford - though I'm sure they wouldn't swear that it's
a> definitive answer - though it is incidentally possible.
--
Paul
Or...
OED mentions an alternative proposed by Bugge,
with Go *haiþans < Gk Greek ἔθνος ‘nation’, (plural) ‘nations,
Gentiles, heathens’, via Armenian het'anos.
navi (and maybe Occam) will be able to tell us what that last one means.
--
athel
occam
2020-01-12 13:34:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Ross
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn>
Post by Dingbat
comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out
of> >>town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and
outlying> >>districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant
something> >>like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being
unable to> >>afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hi0 >> noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid>
Post by Dingbat
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse,
and> >>coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity
had> >been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
Greek Khaideinoi a people of W. Scandinavia (Ptolemy) according to
those> folk at Oxford - though I'm sure they wouldn't swear that it's
a> definitive answer - though it is incidentally possible.
--
Paul
Or...
OED mentions an alternative proposed by Bugge,
with Go *haiþans < Gk  Greek ἔθνος ‘nation’, (plural) ‘nations,
Gentiles, heathens’, via Armenian het'anos.
navi (and maybe Occam) will be able to tell us what that last one means.
Confirmed. 'հեթանոս' (pronounced het'anos) - pagan, heathen

Source: Nayiri online dictionary

https://tinyurl.com/uuargl8

(third entry in the right-hand column.)
a***@gmail.com
2020-01-15 08:53:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn
comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of
town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying
districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something
like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to
afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hi0 >> noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and
coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity had
been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
Greek Khaideinoi a people of W. Scandinavia (Ptolemy) according to those
folk at Oxford - though I'm sure they wouldn't swear that it's a
definitive answer - though it is incidentally possible.
--
Paul
Or...
OED mentions an alternative proposed by Bugge,
with Go *haiþans < Gk Greek ἔθνος ‘nation’, (plural) ‘nations, Gentiles, heathens’, via Armenian het'anos.
I concur with Occam.

As far as I know, (my knowledge of literary Armenian very limited) hetanos
in Armenian means 'heathen', 'pagan'. Funnily enough, because of the 'os'
at the end, I thought the word was of Greek origin. The 'os', as far as I
know, is not a common Armenian noun ending.

Respectfully,
Navi
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-15 09:35:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Ross
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn> >
comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of>
town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying> >
districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something>
like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to> >
afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hi0 >> noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid> >
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and> >
coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity
had> > >been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
Greek Khaideinoi a people of W. Scandinavia (Ptolemy) according to
those> > folk at Oxford - though I'm sure they wouldn't swear that it's
a> > definitive answer - though it is incidentally possible.
--
Paul
Or...
OED mentions an alternative proposed by Bugge,
with Go *haiþans < Gk Greek ἔθνος ‘nation’, (plural) ‘nations,
Gentiles, heathens’, via Armenian het'anos.
I concur with Occam.
As far as I know, (my knowledge of literary Armenian very limited) hetanos
in Armenian means 'heathen', 'pagan'. Funnily enough, because of the 'os'
at the end, I thought the word was of Greek origin. The 'os', as far as
Iknow, is not a common Armenian noun ending.
Respectfully,
Navi
Over to you, Occam: any more light to be shed?
--
athel
occam
2020-01-15 10:16:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by a***@gmail.com
Post by Ross
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn>
Post by Dingbat
comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from
out of> > >>town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers
and outlying> > >>districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant
something> > >>like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who,
being unable to> > >>afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka
the heath.
heath
/hi0 >> noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid>
Post by Dingbat
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse,
and> > >>coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity
had> > >been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
Greek Khaideinoi a people of W. Scandinavia (Ptolemy) according to
those> > folk at Oxford - though I'm sure they wouldn't swear that
it's a> > definitive answer - though it is incidentally possible.
--
Paul
Or...
OED mentions an alternative proposed by Bugge,
with Go *haiþans < Gk  Greek ἔθνος ‘nation’, (plural) ‘nations,
Gentiles, heathens’, via Armenian het'anos.
I concur with Occam.
As far as I know, (my knowledge of literary Armenian very limited) hetanos
in Armenian means 'heathen', 'pagan'. Funnily enough, because of the 'os'
at the end, I thought the word was of Greek origin. The 'os', as far
as Iknow, is not a common Armenian noun ending.
Respectfully,
Navi
Over to you, Occam: any more light to be shed?
Greek roots sounds right. The Armenian alphabet (and language) owes
quite a lot to the Greek language.

According to Britannica:

"... the Armenian alphabet was invented in 405 by Mesrop Mashtots, aided
by Isaac (Sahak) the Great, supreme head of the Armenian Apostolic
Church, and by a Greek called Rufanos."

(Those Greeks scholars got everywhere.)

Re: het'anos

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D5%B0%D5%A5%D5%A9%D5%A1%D5%B6%D5%B8%D5%BD#Old_Armenian
Peter Moylan
2020-01-15 12:13:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Greek roots sounds right. The Armenian alphabet (and language) owes
quite a lot to the Greek language.
"... the Armenian alphabet was invented in 405 by Mesrop Mashtots,
aided by Isaac (Sahak) the Great, supreme head of the Armenian
Apostolic Church, and by a Greek called Rufanos."
(Those Greeks scholars got everywhere.)
Yet they managed to come up with a script that has essentially nothing
in common with the Greek alphabet. At least Cyril managed to find some
common elements between Slavic and Greek.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-15 15:03:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Greek roots sounds right. The Armenian alphabet (and language) owes
quite a lot to the Greek language.
"... the Armenian alphabet was invented in 405 by Mesrop Mashtots,
aided by Isaac (Sahak) the Great, supreme head of the Armenian
Apostolic Church, and by a Greek called Rufanos."
(Those Greeks scholars got everywhere.)
Yet they managed to come up with a script that has essentially nothing
in common with the Greek alphabet. At least Cyril managed to find some
common elements between Slavic and Greek.
There are multiple theories about the origin of (the shapes of) the
Armenian alphabet. It used to be confidently asserted that it was
based on the shapes of the Pahlavi script, or maybe the Parthian
or Sassanian Middle Persian, or free geometric constructions. One
chap rather implausibly suggested it's a collection of letters from
several different scripts.

Modern Armenian typography has abandoned the traditional straight-line,
angular letterforms and replaced them with shapes totally assimilated
to serifed Roman letters. Most disturbingly, the letter h (which was
a sort of tilted L-shape) has changed to an exact copy of Roman h. The
capital H looks not unlike the older form, though. (It's very hard to
find a Unicode font using the old forms!)
Katy Jennison
2020-01-12 12:07:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hiːθ/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity had been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
There's a school of thought which says that it's not so much 'poor
country bumpkin' as someone who continues to follow the reliable, local,
indigenous deities, as opposed to the fashionable new-fangled foreign
deity that some of these fancy city people are wasting their money
building churches for ...
--
Katy Jennison
Janet
2020-01-12 12:33:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse grasses.
More than I ever wanted to know :


<https://www.academia.edu/3483117/Heathen_The_Linguistic_Origins_and_Ear
ly_Context>

Janet
Quinn C
2020-01-13 01:14:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Original meaning of HEATHEN? Did it originally mean "heath dweller"?
      The origin of the term Pagan you may be surprised to learn comes from the Latin 'Paganus' and simply  meant anyone from out of town, in other words countryfolk, yokels, villagers and outlying districts.
I have heard, but not verified, that Heathen too once meant something like Latin Paganus - a poor country bumpkin who, being unable to afford land, lived on unprodutive land, aka the heath.
heath
/hiːθ/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse grasses.
Both OED and Watkins go along with this etymology.
The word was perhaps first coined in Gothic, as a
rough translation of "paganus", reflecting a time when Christianity had been established in the cities, but
the old gods were still worshipped out in the sticks.
And the idea is quite in line with the one that "atheists live in the
jungle" of my Indonesian neighbor, which I've reported on before.
--
It was frequently the fastest way to find what he was looking
for, provided that he was looking for trouble.
-- L. McMaster Bujold, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-13 04:22:01 UTC
Permalink
...
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
--
Jerry Friedman
J. J. Lodder
2020-01-13 10:39:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?

Jan
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-13 14:40:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.

Oh, wait, people do that.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-13 14:52:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
And then he changes his name to Chaz.
Dingbat
2020-01-13 16:31:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
And then he changes his name to Chaz.
Daughter has turned into sonny:-)
Bono? Si!
HVS
2020-01-13 15:19:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on
acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather,
gorse, and coarse grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and
Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
It's a belter of a name.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30 yrs) and BrEng (36 yrs),
indiscriminately mixed
Kerr-Mudd,John
2020-01-13 16:51:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on
acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather,
gorse, and coarse grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and
Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
It's a belter of a name.
I love the slapstick in this NG.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
J. J. Lodder
2020-01-13 20:15:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on
acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather,
gorse, and coarse grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
It's a belter of a name.
Knight: I'm lost, I've forgetten the key to the Wifiy,

Jan
charles
2020-01-13 17:34:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
heath /hi??/ noun 1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land,
typically on acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of
heather, gorse, and coarse grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
and some major company thinks that it's 'virgin'.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter Moylan
2020-01-14 01:11:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
heath /hi??/ noun 1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land,
typically on acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of
heather, gorse, and coarse grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
and some major company thinks that it's 'virgin'.
One of our TV channels is called SBS Viceland. I've never seen an
explanation of how the name was chosen.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Ross
2020-01-14 02:00:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
heath /hi??/ noun 1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land,
typically on acid sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of
heather, gorse, and coarse grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
and some major company thinks that it's 'virgin'.
One of our TV channels is called SBS Viceland. I've never seen an
explanation of how the name was chosen.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Reposting from 2017:

It's all very simple really:

"Operating under the creative direction of film
director Spike Jonze, Viceland has a focus on
lifestyle-oriented documentary and reality series
aimed towards millennials, leveraging the resources
of Vice's verticals with new original series, along
with adaptations of and reruns of existing Vice web
series."

In other words it operates in a universe some way
removed from the one you and I inhabit.

On further investigation, it appears to go back to a magazine called VICE, started in Montreal in the 1990s, which "quickly developed a reputation for provocative and politically incorrect content...."

The editor of the British version explained that "the publication's remit was to cover "the things we're
meant to be ashamed of," and articles were published on topics such as bukkake and bodily functions."

You get the picture. It's meant to be naughty. And it's
for millennials, so don't worry about it.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-15 09:31:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión. Maybe they
shorten it to Circo. I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't
sound very feminine, but it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-15 15:43:00 UTC
Permalink
...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.

Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't
sound very feminine, but it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
--
Jerry Friedman
HVS
2020-01-15 17:37:51 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 08:43:00 -0700, Jerry Friedman
-snip -
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Surname Barnana?

Cheers, Harvey
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-15 17:40:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine, but
it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
--
athel
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-15 17:51:18 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 18:40:23 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine, but
it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
When I taught at the fundy college in North Carolina in the early
1990s, I had two gals in my World History class: Grace and Mercy.

Both of them were very bright, and they helped me correct tests from
other classes. I took them both to lunch one day.

Grace was a hottie, too.
J. J. Lodder
2020-01-15 20:15:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 18:40:23 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine, but
it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
When I taught at the fundy college in North Carolina in the early
1990s, I had two gals in my World History class: Grace and Mercy.
Both of them were very bright, and they helped me correct tests from
other classes. I took them both to lunch one day.
Grace was a hottie, too.
But Mercy was beyond hope?

Jan
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-15 20:23:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 18:40:23 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine, but
it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
When I taught at the fundy college in North Carolina in the early
1990s, I had two gals in my World History class: Grace and Mercy.
Both of them were very bright, and they helped me correct tests from
other classes. I took them both to lunch one day.
Grace was a hottie, too.
But Mercy was beyond hope?
In a footrace, yes. Mercy was tall with long legs.
RH Draney
2020-01-15 21:37:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 18:40:23 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
When I taught at the fundy college in North Carolina in the early
1990s, I had two gals in my World History class: Grace and Mercy.
Both of them were very bright, and they helped me correct tests from
other classes. I took them both to lunch one day.
Grace was a hottie, too.
When I lived in an apartment, the upstairs neighbors were named Carmen
and Tosca....r
Peter Young
2020-01-15 21:55:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by RH Draney
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020 18:40:23 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
When I taught at the fundy college in North Carolina in the early
1990s, I had two gals in my World History class: Grace and Mercy.
Both of them were very bright, and they helped me correct tests from
other classes. I took them both to lunch one day.
Grace was a hottie, too.
When I lived in an apartment, the upstairs neighbors were named Carmen
and Tosca....r
A radiologist I knew when I was a trainee had lived in Sweden. The two med
how lived in flats on the same floor as him were called Odd and Bent.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-15 20:43:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
I suppose the parents had painted themselves into a corner.
Maybe they hoped for a boy.
--
Sam Plusnet
b***@shaw.ca
2020-01-15 20:45:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
I suppose the parents had painted themselves into a corner.
Maybe they hoped for a boy.
Verity and Felicity were still available. I know one of each.

bill
Paul Wolff
2020-01-15 23:12:25 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020, at 18:40:23, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine,
but it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
If I'd been in charge of her naming, I'd have chosen Valletta (in its
favour, a prettier name than Marsaxlokk). Or is there another known
Gladiatrix who'd have contributed a moniker?
--
Paul
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-16 10:06:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020, at 18:40:23, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine, but
it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
If I'd been in charge of her naming, I'd have chosen Valletta (in its
favour, a prettier name than Marsaxlokk
That has a Maltese look about it, and I see that it is. I unwisely
chose Valetta as the answer to one of the questions (Where did your
parents meet?) that Apple use when I need to confirm my identity.
Unwisely because I have difficulty remembering whether it is Valetta or
Valletta, and even if I look it up I don't remember which spelling I
gave Apple (checking, I see that I got it wrong). Marsaxlokk would be
worse, however.
Post by Paul Wolff
). Or is there another known Gladiatrix who'd have contributed a moniker?
--
athel
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-16 20:18:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020, at 18:40:23, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
 "Roslein auf der Heiden"?
 You might as well name a girl Chastity.
 Oh, wait, people do that.
 Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
 OK, that's worse.
 Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
 Chirquita?
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine,
but  it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
 Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
If I'd been in charge of her naming, I'd have chosen Valletta (in its
favour, a prettier name than Marsaxlokk).  Or is there another known
Gladiatrix who'd have contributed a moniker?
Malteser is a sweet name.
--
Sam Plusnet
J. J. Lodder
2020-01-16 20:47:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Paul Wolff
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020, at 18:40:23, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Roslein auf der Heiden"?
You might as well name a girl Chastity.
Oh, wait, people do that.
Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
OK, that's worse.
Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
Chirquita?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very feminine,
but it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
If I'd been in charge of her naming, I'd have chosen Valletta (in its
favour, a prettier name than Marsaxlokk). Or is there another known
Gladiatrix who'd have contributed a moniker?
Malteser is a sweet name.
For a toy,

Jan
Sam Plusnet
2020-01-17 00:07:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Sam Plusnet
Malteser is a sweet name.
For a toy,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltesers
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2020-01-17 00:35:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Sam Plusnet
Malteser is a sweet name.
For a toy,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltesers
Maltesers are available in Orlando, but a similar product - Malt Balls
- are more commonly available.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-17 15:59:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Maltesers are available in Orlando, but a similar product - Malt Balls
- are more commonly available.
I was delighted when I discovered that a "malted milk" could be had
without the malt -- it was called a "milk shake" -- and my mother
was pleased because it cost a nickel less at the soda fountain.

OTOH, she convinced me to try a cheeseburger at the W. T. Grant lunch
counter (on 181st St.) and was annoyed that forever after she'd have
to pay another nickel for lunch.

J. J. Lodder
2020-01-17 13:00:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Sam Plusnet
Malteser is a sweet name.
For a toy,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maltesers
<https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/eb/Maltezer_Vereniging
_Belgie.jpg>

Jan
Paul Wolff
2020-01-16 23:23:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Paul Wolff
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020, at 18:40:23, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
 "Roslein auf der Heiden"?
 You might as well name a girl Chastity.
 Oh, wait, people do that.
 Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
 OK, that's worse.
 Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
 Chirquita?
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very
feminine, but  it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
 Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
If I'd been in charge of her naming, I'd have chosen Valletta (in its
favour, a prettier name than Marsaxlokk).  Or is there another known
Gladiatrix who'd have contributed a moniker?
Malteser is a sweet name.
Who's a smartie then?
--
Paul
Tony Cooper
2020-01-17 00:00:19 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Jan 2020 23:23:38 +0000, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Paul Wolff
On Wed, 15 Jan 2020, at 18:40:23, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
 "Roslein auf der Heiden"?
 You might as well name a girl Chastity.
 Oh, wait, people do that.
 Some unfortunate women in Spain are named Circoncisión.
 OK, that's worse.
 Were they born on (*checks*) New Year's Day?
Maybe they shorten it to Circo.
 Chirquita?
I once knew someone called Patro, which didn't sound very
feminine, but  it was short for Patrocinio de Jesús.
 Which still doesn't.
In the 1950s we knew someone whose three older sisters were called
Faith, Hope and Charity. She herself was called Barbara, however.
If I'd been in charge of her naming, I'd have chosen Valletta (in its
favour, a prettier name than Marsaxlokk).  Or is there another known
Gladiatrix who'd have contributed a moniker?
Malteser is a sweet name.
Who's a smartie then?
Sour grape.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-13 14:26:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Heath" was a nickname for -- IKYN -- Heathcliff.

(Ledger.)
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-13 17:57:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
heath
/hi??/
noun
1. (British) an area of open uncultivated land, typically on acid
sandy soil, with characteristic vegetation of heather, gorse, and coarse
grasses.
Yes, and not specific to English.
All? Germanic languages have a similar word
with the same meaning,
Apparently Heath Leger did not have sisters named Heidi and Erica.
"Heath" was a nickname for -- IKYN -- Heathcliff.
(Ledger.)
Oops. I guess I took the need to check my memory too lightly.
--
Jerry Friedman
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