Discussion:
oppo
(too old to reply)
Harrison Hill
2018-05-15 08:13:39 UTC
Permalink
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.

Meanwhile Athel's assertion that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
Towan Beach:

<https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@50.4149734,-5.0852879,3a,75y,52.23h,88.7t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1sgAbS4mQrs8yNka3FzwqsEA!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo3.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DgAbS4mQrs8yNka3FzwqsEA%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D78.35407%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656?hl=en>
Whiskers
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
Harrison Hill <***@gmail.com> Wrote in message:

[...]
Post by Harrison Hill
Meanwhile Athel's assertion
I seem to have missed that.
Post by Harrison Hill
that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
[...]

Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic.

Then there are the two sides of the Atlantic to consider.
--
^^^^^^^^^^
Whiskers
~~~~~~~~~~


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-15 10:44:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Whiskers
[...]
Post by Harrison Hill
Meanwhile Athel's assertion
I seem to have missed that.
Post by Harrison Hill
that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
[...]
Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic.
Then there are the two sides of the Atlantic to consider.
No, one faces the Atlantic, the other faces the English Channel.
Neither of them belong to the Atlantic as such as Cornwall is
a promontory which cleaves the Celtic Sea.
Peter Moylan
2018-05-15 10:47:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Whiskers
[...]
Post by Harrison Hill
Meanwhile Athel's assertion
I seem to have missed that.
Post by Harrison Hill
that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
[...]
Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic.
And is there a point in Newquay from which you can see both coasts?
That's what Harrison appeared to be claiming.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Harrison Hill
2018-05-17 06:02:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Whiskers
[...]
Post by Harrison Hill
Meanwhile Athel's assertion
I seem to have missed that.
Post by Harrison Hill
that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
[...]
Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic.
And is there a point in Newquay from which you can see both coasts?
That's what Harrison appeared to be claiming.
All you and Athel have to do is look at a map, and you can see
the two beaches facing in opposite directions. Why would you expect
to see both coastlines from "a point in Newquay"?

"Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic", is correct. Newquay's coast however faces
(predominantly) west and east.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-17 06:46:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Whiskers
[...]
Post by Harrison Hill
Meanwhile Athel's assertion
I seem to have missed that.
Post by Harrison Hill
that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
[...]
Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic.
And is there a point in Newquay from which you can see both coasts?
That's what Harrison appeared to be claiming.
All you and Athel have to do is look at a map, and you can see
the two beaches facing in opposite directions.
Bollocks, unless you have special maps issued by the Newquay Chamber of
Commerce that differ from unbiassed maps.
Post by Harrison Hill
Why would you expect
to see both coastlines from "a point in Newquay"?
"Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic", is correct. Newquay's coast however faces
(predominantly) west and east.
--
athel
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-15 13:01:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Whiskers
[...]
Post by Harrison Hill
Meanwhile Athel's assertion
I seem to have missed that.
Post by Harrison Hill
that two beaches facing the
You missed it because it isn't there. 'Arrison inventd it.
Post by Whiskers
Post by Harrison Hill
Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
[...]
Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic.
Then there are the two sides of the Atlantic to consider.
--
athel
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-16 22:01:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Whiskers
[...]
Post by Harrison Hill
Meanwhile Athel's assertion
I seem to have missed that.
Post by Harrison Hill
that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
[...]
Cornwall has two coasts, one facing north the other facing south;
both face the Atlantic.
There is also a tiny bit around Cape Cornwall/Lands End which faces west.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-15 12:39:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).

Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-15 14:28:48 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 15 May 2018 05:39:12 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
It goes back well before the "obscure English TV series".
OED:

slang (orig. Services' slang).

= opposite number n. at opposite n., adj., adv., and prep. Special
uses. Occasionally: a sweetheart, partner, or spouse.

1932 S. Knock Clear Lower Deck xxxvi. 262 On the bridge, he
chuckles to his oppo, and in due course the messdeck gossips
discuss their chaplain's penchant for the semi-nude.
....

opposite number n. a person or (occasionally) organization holding
an equivalent place or fulfilling an equivalent role to another
specified person or organization in a different country, group,
institution, etc.; a partner, a counterpart.

IME "oppo" is used as defined here:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/oppo

British
informal

A colleague or friend.
‘an old oppo of mine’
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-15 14:39:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 15 May 2018 05:39:12 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
It goes back well before the "obscure English TV series".
You mean, HH might have come up with an incorrect suggestion?
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
slang (orig. Services' slang).
= opposite number n. at opposite n., adj., adv., and prep. Special
uses. Occasionally: a sweetheart, partner, or spouse.
1932 S. Knock Clear Lower Deck xxxvi. 262 On the bridge, he
chuckles to his oppo, and in due course the messdeck gossips
discuss their chaplain's penchant for the semi-nude.
....
opposite number n. a person or (occasionally) organization holding
an equivalent place or fulfilling an equivalent role to another
specified person or organization in a different country, group,
institution, etc.; a partner, a counterpart.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/oppo
British
informal
A colleague or friend.
‘an old oppo of mine’
Oh. That would make no sense Over Here.
Paul Wolff
2018-05-15 22:21:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 15 May 2018 05:39:12 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
It goes back well before the "obscure English TV series".
slang (orig. Services' slang).
= opposite number n. at opposite n., adj., adv., and prep. Special
uses. Occasionally: a sweetheart, partner, or spouse.
1932 S. Knock Clear Lower Deck xxxvi. 262 On the bridge, he
chuckles to his oppo, and in due course the messdeck gossips
discuss their chaplain's penchant for the semi-nude.
....
opposite number n. a person or (occasionally) organization holding
an equivalent place or fulfilling an equivalent role to another
specified person or organization in a different country, group,
institution, etc.; a partner, a counterpart.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/oppo
British
informal
A colleague or friend.
‘an old oppo of mine’
But in croquet, the adversary.
--
Paul
Ross
2018-05-15 20:26:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
It's often difficult to understand what HH is on about, but I don't see
him making any reference to the American political usage, much less
suggesting that it was derived from "Z-Cars".
There is, however, a different "oppo", a noun meaning '(the) opposition'.
for which Green has three quotes (1989, 1995, 2001) illustrating
British criminal usage.
Meanwhile, OED has "oppo (research)", in the sense you refer to,
attested from 1990 in US sources. I wouldn't rule out some influence.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-15 20:34:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
It's often difficult to understand what HH is on about, but I don't see
him making any reference to the American political usage, much less
suggesting that it was derived from "Z-Cars".
There is, however, a different "oppo", a noun meaning '(the) opposition'.
for which Green has three quotes (1989, 1995, 2001) illustrating
British criminal usage.
Meanwhile, OED has "oppo (research)", in the sense you refer to,
attested from 1990 in US sources. I wouldn't rule out some influence.
You'd have to find evidence that *Zed-Cars* was available, some 25 years
after it was made, on some nascent cable network.
Ross
2018-05-15 22:33:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
It's often difficult to understand what HH is on about, but I don't see
him making any reference to the American political usage, much less
suggesting that it was derived from "Z-Cars".
There is, however, a different "oppo", a noun meaning '(the) opposition'.
for which Green has three quotes (1989, 1995, 2001) illustrating
British criminal usage.
Meanwhile, OED has "oppo (research)", in the sense you refer to,
attested from 1990 in US sources. I wouldn't rule out some influence.
You'd have to find evidence that *Zed-Cars* was available, some 25 years
after it was made, on some nascent cable network.
No, Peter, read it again. I am not suggesting direct influence from
"Z-Cars". (Neither, as far as I can see, was HH.)
Paul Wolff
2018-05-15 22:19:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
'Oppo' is croquet-speak, among those who like to tell tales of their
successes, for what the laws of croquet term "the adversary".

I can't date it. I suspect it's limited to the last twenty years or so.
--
Paul
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-16 10:20:00 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 15 May 2018 23:19:35 +0100, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
'Oppo' is croquet-speak, among those who like to tell tales of their
successes, for what the laws of croquet term "the adversary".
That's new to me.
Might it be an abbreviation of "opponent"?
Post by Paul Wolff
I can't date it. I suspect it's limited to the last twenty years or so.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Paul Wolff
2018-05-16 11:00:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Tue, 15 May 2018 23:19:35 +0100, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
'Oppo' is croquet-speak, among those who like to tell tales of their
successes, for what the laws of croquet term "the adversary".
That's new to me.
Might it be an abbreviation of "opponent"?
Yes, or 'opposition', see below.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Paul Wolff
I can't date it. I suspect it's limited to the last twenty years or so.
Consistent with the post from Ross that gave some dates, albeit in a
criminal context:

There is, however, a different "oppo", a noun meaning '(the)
opposition'. for which Green has three quotes (1989, 1995, 2001)
illustrating British criminal usage.
--
Paul
Ross
2018-05-16 10:55:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Amongst the many uses I have for "opposite", is "opposite number" - which
can refer to the person sitting alongside you - sharing your view of the
world. I have an idea that the abbreviation "oppo" came to me from the
gritty 1960s TV series Z-Cars ("zed-cars"), which made stars of most of
its cast. I cannot remember who Fancy Smith's "oppo" was in Zed-Victor One;
but that program is now available in YouTube, so when I have the time I
will be able to track it down.
I doubt that anyone among the American politicians who came up with the
term "oppo research" (finding bad things to say about one's political
opponents) in the 21st century were aware of some obscure English TV
series of nearly half a century earlier, of which exemplars probably no
longer exist (since the BBC was even more cavalier than NBC about
preserving its programmes).
Though the cutesy abbreviation "oppo" does smack of Australian or
possibly English input.
'Oppo' is croquet-speak, among those who like to tell tales of their
successes, for what the laws of croquet term "the adversary".
I can't date it. I suspect it's limited to the last twenty years or so.
--
Paul
See my note and Green's citations of "oppo" = "(the) opposition" from
British criminal usage.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-15 12:59:35 UTC
Permalink
[ Irrelevant burbling skipped ]
Meanwhile Athel's assertion that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
Really, you need to make an effort to understand what you read.

'Arrison has cunningly started a new thread to make it difficult to
check my "assertion", which was in the "Having just returned from the
UK thread", following a post by him at 15.36 (my time, I suppose) on
‘Arrison: If you have teenagers with you, go to Newquay - it has a very rowdy
night-life, and is the surfing capital of Britain. It also has two
perfect beaches - facing in opposite directions,
Madrigal: I'm not sure that that's even possible but it certainly isn't
the case
at Newquay!
‘Arrison: You are defining "opposite" as "perpendicularly opposed"?
Me: Where did he define "opposite"? As far as I can see, he didn't.
Anyway, Google Maps in satellite view agrees with him, not with you.
Both beaches face, as one would guess, the Atlantic.
Now where is this "assertion"? There isn't one. Saying they face the
Atlantic is just support for Madrigal's statement, not a primary reason
for saying that the directions are not opposite to one another.
Slightly different, yes, by about 30°, I suppose, but whatever
'Arrison's mother may have told him that is not what "facing in
opposite directions" means.
--
athel
Harrison Hill
2018-05-15 17:34:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ Irrelevant burbling skipped ]
Meanwhile Athel's assertion that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
Really, you need to make an effort to understand what you read.
'Arrison has cunningly started a new thread to make it difficult to
check my "assertion", which was in the "Having just returned from the
UK thread", following a post by him at 15.36 (my time, I suppose) on
‘Arrison: If you have teenagers with you, go to Newquay - it has a very rowdy
night-life, and is the surfing capital of Britain. It also has two
perfect beaches - facing in opposite directions,
Madrigal: I'm not sure that that's even possible but it certainly isn't
the case
at Newquay!
‘Arrison: You are defining "opposite" as "perpendicularly opposed"?
Me: Where did he define "opposite"? As far as I can see, he didn't.
Anyway, Google Maps in satellite view agrees with him, not with you.
Both beaches face, as one would guess, the Atlantic.
Now where is this "assertion"? There isn't one. Saying they face the
Atlantic is just support for Madrigal's statement, not a primary reason
for saying that the directions are not opposite to one another.
Slightly different, yes, by about 30°, I suppose, but whatever
'Arrison's mother may have told him that is not what "facing in
opposite directions" means.
"Slightly different" in the sense that facing SW towards Miama, is
slightly different to facing NE towards Archangel. If Russia and
the USA are in the same direction, there is hope for us all.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-15 18:21:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ Irrelevant burbling skipped ]
Meanwhile Athel's assertion that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
Really, you need to make an effort to understand what you read.
'Arrison has cunningly started a new thread to make it difficult to>
check my "assertion", which was in the "Having just returned from the>
UK thread", following a post by him at 15.36 (my time, I suppose) on>
‘Arrison: If you have teenagers with you, go to Newquay - it has a very rowdy
night-life, and is the surfing capital of Britain. It also has two
perfect beaches - facing in opposite directions,
Madrigal: I'm not sure that that's even possible but it certainly
isn't> > the case
at Newquay!
‘Arrison: You are defining "opposite" as "perpendicularly opposed"?
Me: Where did he define "opposite"? As far as I can see, he didn't.> >
Anyway, Google Maps in satellite view agrees with him, not with you.> >
Both beaches face, as one would guess, the Atlantic.
Now where is this "assertion"? There isn't one. Saying they face the>
Atlantic is just support for Madrigal's statement, not a primary
reason> for saying that the directions are not opposite to one
another.> Slightly different, yes, by about 30°, I suppose, but
whatever> 'Arrison's mother may have told him that is not what "facing
in> opposite directions" means.
"Slightly different" in the sense that facing SW towards Miama, is
slightly different to facing NE towards Archangel. If Russia and
the USA are in the same direction, there is hope for us all.
I'd never heard of Miama, but it appears to be in Spain, and its
relevance isn't obvious to me. Maybe you meant Miami.

As for the rest, I can't be bothered to continue with someone who has
obviously not looked at the map.
--
athel
Tony Cooper
2018-05-15 20:08:20 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 15 May 2018 20:21:03 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ Irrelevant burbling skipped ]
Meanwhile Athel's assertion that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
Really, you need to make an effort to understand what you read.
'Arrison has cunningly started a new thread to make it difficult to>
check my "assertion", which was in the "Having just returned from the>
UK thread", following a post by him at 15.36 (my time, I suppose) on>
‘Arrison: If you have teenagers with you, go to Newquay - it has a very rowdy
night-life, and is the surfing capital of Britain. It also has two
perfect beaches - facing in opposite directions,
Madrigal: I'm not sure that that's even possible but it certainly
isn't> > the case
at Newquay!
‘Arrison: You are defining "opposite" as "perpendicularly opposed"?
Me: Where did he define "opposite"? As far as I can see, he didn't.> >
Anyway, Google Maps in satellite view agrees with him, not with you.> >
Both beaches face, as one would guess, the Atlantic.
Now where is this "assertion"? There isn't one. Saying they face the>
Atlantic is just support for Madrigal's statement, not a primary
reason> for saying that the directions are not opposite to one
another.> Slightly different, yes, by about 30°, I suppose, but
whatever> 'Arrison's mother may have told him that is not what "facing
in> opposite directions" means.
"Slightly different" in the sense that facing SW towards Miama, is
slightly different to facing NE towards Archangel. If Russia and
the USA are in the same direction, there is hope for us all.
I'd never heard of Miama, but it appears to be in Spain, and its
relevance isn't obvious to me. Maybe you meant Miami.
Not in Miami, but a few miles south of Miami there can be two beaches
facing the opposite direction from the other, and both facing body of
water that the other is not facing.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-16 05:36:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Tue, 15 May 2018 20:21:03 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ Irrelevant burbling skipped ]
Meanwhile Athel's assertion that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
Really, you need to make an effort to understand what you read.
'Arrison has cunningly started a new thread to make it difficult to>
check my "assertion", which was in the "Having just returned from the>
UK thread", following a post by him at 15.36 (my time, I suppose) on>
‘Arrison: If you have teenagers with you, go to Newquay - it has a very rowdy
night-life, and is the surfing capital of Britain. It also has two
perfect beaches - facing in opposite directions,
Madrigal: I'm not sure that that's even possible but it certainly
isn't> > the case
at Newquay!
‘Arrison: You are defining "opposite" as "perpendicularly opposed"?
Me: Where did he define "opposite"? As far as I can see, he didn't.> >
Anyway, Google Maps in satellite view agrees with him, not with you.> >
Both beaches face, as one would guess, the Atlantic.
Now where is this "assertion"? There isn't one. Saying they face the>
Atlantic is just support for Madrigal's statement, not a primary
reason> for saying that the directions are not opposite to one
another.> Slightly different, yes, by about 30°, I suppose, but
whatever> 'Arrison's mother may have told him that is not what "facing
in> opposite directions" means.
"Slightly different" in the sense that facing SW towards Miama, is
slightly different to facing NE towards Archangel. If Russia and
the USA are in the same direction, there is hope for us all.
I'd never heard of Miama, but it appears to be in Spain, and its
relevance isn't obvious to me. Maybe you meant Miami.
Not in Miami, but a few miles south of Miami there can be two beaches
facing the opposite direction from the other, and both facing body of
water that the other is not facing.
I don't doubt that that's possible; I just doubt that that's what you
have at Newquay. Not far from here (on the isthmus to the Presqu'île de
Giens) you can find beaches parallel to one another that face in
opposite directions. However, they both face the Mediterranean. If you
want different bodies of water I think you can probably find examples
near Sète.
--
athel
Harrison Hill
2018-05-15 18:50:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ Irrelevant burbling skipped ]
Meanwhile Athel's assertion that two beaches facing the Atlantic must, for
that reason, be facing in the same direction, is interesting logic. This
is a link to Google Street View, looking east across Newquay's beautiful
Really, you need to make an effort to understand what you read.
'Arrison has cunningly started a new thread to make it difficult to
check my "assertion", which was in the "Having just returned from the
UK thread", following a post by him at 15.36 (my time, I suppose) on
‘Arrison: If you have teenagers with you, go to Newquay - it has a very rowdy
night-life, and is the surfing capital of Britain. It also has two
perfect beaches - facing in opposite directions,
Madrigal: I'm not sure that that's even possible but it certainly isn't
the case
at Newquay!
‘Arrison: You are defining "opposite" as "perpendicularly opposed"?
Me: Where did he define "opposite"? As far as I can see, he didn't.
Anyway, Google Maps in satellite view agrees with him, not with you.
Both beaches face, as one would guess, the Atlantic.
Now where is this "assertion"? There isn't one. Saying they face the
Atlantic is just support for Madrigal's statement, not a primary reason
for saying that the directions are not opposite to one another.
Slightly different, yes, by about 30°, I suppose, but whatever
'Arrison's mother may have told him that is not what "facing in
opposite directions" means.
"Slightly different" in the sense that facing SW towards Miama, is
slightly different to facing NE towards Archangel. If Russia and
the USA are in the same direction, there is hope for us all.
Miami.
Loading...