Discussion:
barks at anyone
(too old to reply)
a***@gmail.com
2020-01-04 05:31:58 UTC
Permalink
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.

Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?

I don't think '2' works. Am I correct?

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3) His dog barks at everyone.
4) His dog barks at anyone.

Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
Do both sentences mean the same?

I think they both work and mean the same. Am I correct?


--------------------------

5) He dates everyone.
6) He dates anyone.

Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
Do both sentences mean the same?
If there is a difference in the meanings, what is it?


Does '5' imply that he cheats on people he dates?
Does it imply that he dates more than one person at a time?

I prefer '6' to '5'. I think the negative connotation in '5' is stronger.


Gratefully,
Navi
David Kleinecke
2020-01-04 06:22:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
I don't think '2' works. Am I correct?
-----------------------------
3) His dog barks at everyone.
4) His dog barks at anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
Do both sentences mean the same?
I think they both work and mean the same. Am I correct?
--------------------------
5) He dates everyone.
6) He dates anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
Do both sentences mean the same?
If there is a difference in the meanings, what is it?
Does '5' imply that he cheats on people he dates?
Does it imply that he dates more than one person at a time?
I prefer '6' to '5'. I think the negative connotation in '5' is stronger.
You are right (2) is not good English. I think the failure
is semantic rather than syntactic.

Between [(3) and (4)] and [(5) and (6)] there is a nuance and
(4) and (6) seem to make the subject less choosy.

I do not understand how this works. I do not understand how one
can be less particular than choosing everyone - but that's the
way English crumbles.
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-04 14:40:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
I don't think '2' works. Am I correct?
You are correct. "Negative polarity."
Post by a***@gmail.com
-----------------------------
3) His dog barks at everyone.
4) His dog barks at anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
Do both sentences mean the same?
I think they both work and mean the same. Am I correct?
Yes, no, no. (3) = he is likely to bark at all people (probably for cause).
(4) = he doesn't care who a person is or what they've done, he'll bark when
they show up.
Post by a***@gmail.com
--------------------------
5) He dates everyone.
6) He dates anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
Do both sentences mean the same?
If there is a difference in the meanings, what is it?
Exactly the same as (3)-(4).
Post by a***@gmail.com
Does '5' imply that he cheats on people he dates?
Does it imply that he dates more than one person at a time?
no, no.
Post by a***@gmail.com
I prefer '6' to '5'. I think the negative connotation in '5' is stronger.
no. (6) says he is indiscriminate. (5) says he is generous.
Spains Harden
2020-01-04 17:24:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are correct Thank God you didn't bring up "anybody" and "everybody".
Post by a***@gmail.com
I don't think '2' works. Am I correct?
No. 2 works just fine.
Post by a***@gmail.com
3) His dog barks at everyone.
4) His dog barks at anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
Do both sentences mean the same?
I think they both work and mean the same. Am I correct?
--------------------------
5) He dates everyone.
6) He dates anyone.
These are different:

5) means: 5a} He promiscuously dates everyone.
6) means: 6a} He wil date anyone.
Anton Shepelev
2020-01-05 12:56:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are cor-
rect
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It requires
a predicate, e.g.:

His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
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Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-05 13:51:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are cor-
rect
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It requires
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
"Spains Harden" is "'Arrison 'Ill", so his response is as stupid as usual.
--
athel
Spains Harden
2020-01-05 19:33:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are cor-
rect
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It requires
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
"Spains Harden" is "'Arrison 'Ill", so his response is as stupid as usual.
Okay Ethel Cornish-Pasty.

The difference between:

"His dog barks at anyone with a beard".
"His dog barks at everyone with a beard".

...in your own time.
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-05 19:56:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are cor-
rect
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It requires
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
"Spains Harden" is "'Arrison 'Ill", so his response is as stupid as usual.
Okay Ethel Cornish-Pasty.
"His dog barks at anyone with a beard".
"His dog barks at everyone with a beard".
...in your own time.
The difference between "Some" and "All." Anton pointed the way for you.
Spains Harden
2020-01-05 20:09:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are cor-
rect
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It requires
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
"Spains Harden" is "'Arrison 'Ill", so his response is as stupid as usual.
Okay Ethel Cornish-Pasty.
"His dog barks at anyone with a beard".
"His dog barks at everyone with a beard".
...in your own time.
The difference between "Some" and "All." Anton pointed the way for you.
Are you distinguishing between:

"His dog barks at people with a beard"?
"His dog barks at all people with a beard"

"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook PTD,
but thanks for adding it to the lexicon.
Anton Shepelev
2020-01-05 20:50:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up. Why do you think
it gobbledygook? What is a gobbledybook?
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Peter Moylan
2020-01-06 00:15:06 UTC
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Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up. Why do you think it gobbledygook?
What is a gobbledybook?
"who but looks at it" is good English but a bit old-fashioned, so could
be unfamiliar to someone who doesn't read much.

A gobbledebook is probably a book about eating.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
RH Draney
2020-01-06 00:51:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up.  Why do you think it gobbledygook?
What is a gobbledybook?
"who but looks at it" is good English but a bit old-fashioned, so could
be unfamiliar to someone who doesn't read much.
A gobbledebook is probably a book about eating.
Not to be confused with a hobbledehoy....

(Now why on earth is spellcheck complaining about that?...it's exactly
the same as in Wiktionary, MW, World Wide Words, dictionary.com, Lexico,
Collins, and Urban Dictionary)....r
CDB
2020-01-06 15:04:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up. Why do you think it
gobbledygook? What is a gobbledybook?
"who but looks at it" is good English but a bit old-fashioned, so
could be unfamiliar to someone who doesn't read much.
A gobbledebook is probably a book about eating.
Especially the eating of gallopavones.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2020-01-06 20:52:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up. Why do you think it gobbledygook?
What is a gobbledybook?
"who but looks at it" is good English but a bit old-fashioned, so could
be unfamiliar to someone who doesn't read much.
Exactly
Post by Peter Moylan
A gobbledebook is probably a book about eating.
In this instance gobbledygook is something 'Arrison can't parse.
--
athel
Tony Cooper
2020-01-06 22:17:29 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 6 Jan 2020 21:52:10 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up. Why do you think it gobbledygook?
What is a gobbledybook?
"who but looks at it" is good English but a bit old-fashioned, so could
be unfamiliar to someone who doesn't read much.
Exactly
Post by Peter Moylan
A gobbledebook is probably a book about eating.
In this instance gobbledygook is something 'Arrison can't parse.
Wouldn't "gobbledygook" be a racist slur now?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
b***@aol.com
2020-01-06 23:41:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 6 Jan 2020 21:52:10 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up. Why do you think it gobbledygook?
What is a gobbledybook?
"who but looks at it" is good English but a bit old-fashioned, so could
be unfamiliar to someone who doesn't read much.
Exactly
Post by Peter Moylan
A gobbledebook is probably a book about eating.
In this instance gobbledygook is something 'Arrison can't parse.
Wouldn't "gobbledygook" be a racist slur now?
I dink you're right.
Post by Tony Cooper
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RH Draney
2020-01-07 07:43:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 6 Jan 2020 21:52:10 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook
It is an example that I made up. Why do you think it gobbledygook?
What is a gobbledybook?
"who but looks at it" is good English but a bit old-fashioned, so could
be unfamiliar to someone who doesn't read much.
Exactly
Post by Peter Moylan
A gobbledebook is probably a book about eating.
In this instance gobbledygook is something 'Arrison can't parse.
Wouldn't "gobbledygook" be a racist slur now?
Asians have a highly developed sense of irony:

Loading Image...

....r

Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-06 12:55:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Spains Harden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are cor-
rect
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It requires
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
"Spains Harden" is "'Arrison 'Ill", so his response is as stupid as usual.
Okay Ethel Cornish-Pasty.
"His dog barks at anyone with a beard".
"His dog barks at everyone with a beard".
...in your own time.
The difference between "Some" and "All." Anton pointed the way for you.
"His dog barks at people with a beard"?
"His dog barks at all people with a beard"
A frequent problem at AUS is the assumption that an existential statement
is "really" a universal statement.
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it" is gobbledygook PTD,
but thanks for adding it to the lexicon.
That would be the old "but" meaning 'merely'.
Anton Shepelev
2020-01-05 20:45:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone with a beard".
"His dog barks at everyone with a beard".
To me, these express the same thought in different
ways. The first may be rewritten as:

Take any man with a beard. You may be certain
that his dog will bark at him.

Can you now tell and explain the difference between

He can do anything
He can do everything
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Spains Harden
2020-01-05 20:53:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Spains Harden
"His dog barks at anyone with a beard".
"His dog barks at everyone with a beard".
To me, these express the same thought in different
Take any man with a beard. You may be certain
that his dog will bark at him.
Can you now tell and explain the difference between
He can do anything
He can do everything
There is no difference. He can do it all.
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-05 15:14:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
"Anyone" is "everyone" so of course both are cor-
rect
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It requires
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
Wrong. "His dog will bark at anyone."

Why the auxiliary makes a difference, I cannot say.
Anton Shepelev
2020-01-05 17:34:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It re-
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
Wrong. "His dog will bark at anyone."
Why the auxiliary makes a difference, I cannot
say.
I thought you did not acknowledge the existence of
reasons in grammar and syntax, but I can give you
mine. Whereas the Present Simple denotes a habit
and thus comprises many actions, the habitual Future
Simple still formally represents a singular action,
wherefore "will bark at everyone" is wrong for the
intended meaning. I should even think that it im-
plies a predicate, such as "...who comes in sight,"
which in turn lets one interpret the habitual Future
Perfect in terms of the non-habitual, i.e.

If anyone comes near to his dog it will bark at
him.

The generality instinct in `anyone' turns the main
clause into an habitual or general statement when
the condition is omitted. We can thus omit only the
"default" or most general conditions.

Again, the "for each" quantifier in predicate calcu-
lus provides a good analogy for those familliar with
it. `everyone' is: Ax P(x)
and `anyone' is: Ax C(x) => P(x),
where the condition C() may be explicit or implicit.
Negations are amenable to a similar analogy.
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Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-05 18:06:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anton Shepelev
Post by Peter T. Daniels
`anyone' is not `everyone', but is like the "for
each" quantifier in predicate calculus. It re-
His dog barks at anyone with a beard.
His dog barks at anyone who but looks at it.
His dog barks at anyone who turns his back to it.
Wrong. "His dog will bark at anyone."
Why the auxiliary makes a difference, I cannot
say.
I thought you did not acknowledge the existence of
reasons in grammar and syntax,
I take it you've never read a linguistics article on syntax or semantics.
Post by Anton Shepelev
but I can give you
mine. Whereas the Present Simple denotes a habit
and thus comprises many actions, the habitual Future
Simple still formally represents a singular action,
wherefore "will bark at everyone" is wrong for the
intended meaning. I should even think that it im-
plies a predicate, such as "...who comes in sight,"
which in turn lets one interpret the habitual Future
Perfect in terms of the non-habitual, i.e.
That's a theory. (Not a particularly persuasive one, but a theory.)
The way you would support it is by finding (or, if necessary, creating)
a wide variety of examples exemplifying your interpretation, on which
you could get a number of agreements from native speakers; and by finding
examples of similar sentences that don't share that interpretation,
according to your consultants, and accounting for the differences.
Post by Anton Shepelev
If anyone comes near to his dog it will bark at
him.
The generality instinct in `anyone' turns the main
clause into an habitual or general statement when
the condition is omitted. We can thus omit only the
"default" or most general conditions.
Does this figure into the facts of "negative polarity," a distinctive
characteristic of English?

(1) He told everyone.
(2) He didn't tell anyone.

("He didn't tell everyone" isn't the negation of [1].)
Post by Anton Shepelev
Again, the "for each" quantifier in predicate calcu-
lus provides a good analogy for those familliar with
it. `everyone' is: Ax P(x)
and `anyone' is: Ax C(x) => P(x),
where the condition C() may be explicit or implicit.
Negations are amenable to a similar analogy.
For a few uses of those words.
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-05 16:27:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
I don't think '2' works. Am I correct?
-----------------------------
3) His dog barks at everyone.
4) His dog barks at anyone.
He barks at the moon?
b***@aol.com
2020-01-06 23:44:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) His dog dislikes everyone.
2) His dog dislikes anyone.
Are both sentences grammatical and meaningful?
I don't think '2' works. Am I correct?
-----------------------------
3) His dog barks at everyone.
4) His dog barks at anyone.
He barks at the moon?
Yes, he's not sectarian.
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