Discussion:
Heart of the matter VS Brain of the matter
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bruce bowser
2021-04-22 17:02:48 UTC
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What's the difference between the two phrases?
Mack A. Damia
2021-04-22 17:17:16 UTC
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On Thu, 22 Apr 2021 10:02:48 -0700 (PDT), bruce bowser
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
Doesn't matter.
s***@my-deja.com
2021-04-22 20:28:20 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
Can it be that you just made up the second one?
bruce bowser
2021-04-23 19:14:47 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
Can it be that you just made up the second one?
YES, if and only if I wrote every "brain of the matter" phrase appearing on the internet.
Google: "brain of the matter", yourself
s***@my-deja.com
2021-04-23 21:04:14 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
Can it be that you just made up the second one?
YES, if and only if I wrote every "brain of the matter" phrase appearing on the internet.
Google: "brain of the matter", yourself
So you DID make it up!
Peter Moylan
2021-04-24 05:38:05 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
Can it be that you just made up the second one?
YES, if and only if I wrote every "brain of the matter" phrase appearing on the internet.
Google: "brain of the matter", yourself
So you DID make it up!
No results found for "brain of bruce bowser".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-25 21:19:48 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
Can it be that you just made up the second one?
Yes so it actually means:

"Notice me! Notice me! I want attention."
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Dingbat
2021-04-24 09:47:13 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.

Changing the subject to taking an oath:

"Cross my heart and hope to die" is one way to swear that something is true.

In Hindi, however, one swears on one's head, possibly by placing a revered object on it.

In slang, I've heard "You bet your sweet ass."

Does it make a difference whether one swears on one's heart, one's head or one' interlocutor's ass?


Here's where there's a difference:
If there's someone in your heart, you're infatuated.
If there's someone in your head, you're possessed.
if someone is on your ass, you're being stalked.
bruce bowser
2021-04-26 19:09:10 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have used the phrase.
(at least that's what google search results say)

You're even getting fussy with the University of Southern California:
-- https://news.usc.edu/50461/the-brain-of-the-matter/
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-26 21:04:52 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have used the phrase.
(at least that's what google search results say)
-- https://news.usc.edu/50461/the-brain-of-the-matter/
And rightly so. This shouldn't be about human body parts, even
metaphorically.

The "heart" in question is simply the _CENTRE_.

How can you think this is about where human thought and emotion are
supposed to emanate from, instead?
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter Moylan
2021-04-27 01:19:27 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have
used the phrase. (at least that's what google search results say)
Are you putting "the brain of the matter" in quotation marks? If not,
you get a lot of irrelevant results.

Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results. Searching with Google
does return some results, mostly to do with brain damage. I don't know
why there is a difference.

One of the articles that Google found was about "foreign accent
syndrome" - the existence of which is apparently disputed - where people
speak differently after brain damage. I did once meet a young woman who
claimed that her American accent was caused by brain damage.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
bruce bowser
2021-04-27 12:12:55 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have
used the phrase. (at least that's what google search results say)
Are you putting "the brain of the matter" in quotation marks? If not,
you get a lot of irrelevant results.
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results.
I've never heard of them.
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-27 13:21:14 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have
used the phrase. (at least that's what google search results say)
Are you putting "the brain of the matter" in quotation marks? If not,
you get a lot of irrelevant results.
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results.
I've never heard of them.
It would appear you've literally heard of very little on the Web except
Google and Amazon. How that's possible in 2021 is beyond me, but you
manage it.

Which, incidentally, probably explains why so many of your other posts
after finding this "Google Group" (which it really ISN'T because it's
actually a USENET NEWSGROUP that pre-dates the existence of GG by quite
possibly 20 years, and Google itself by at least a decade) are responses
to two-decade-plus-old articles whose posters are in many cases LONG
deceased.

"More things in Heaven and Earth" "Horatio", etc. (or maybe you're just
actively trying to avoid "woke alternatives" to "companies pinkos want
cancelled". Which is its own rabbit hole that I have no intention of
going down, but then guys[1] like that tend to learn the "leftist
company" names if only so they don't accidentally give them business).

And if you can't understand THAT reference, then kindly stop posting
anything.


---1. Used advisedly; most of the people who feel that they need to make
sure that "get woke, go broke" is a thing are men
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-27 19:47:57 UTC
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On 27-Apr-21 14:21, Chrysi Cat wrote: (to a troll)
Post by Chrysi Cat
And if you can't understand THAT reference, then kindly stop posting
anything.
Wishful thinking.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
bruce bowser
2021-04-30 19:34:53 UTC
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Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have
used the phrase. (at least that's what google search results say)
Are you putting "the brain of the matter" in quotation marks? If not,
you get a lot of irrelevant results.
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results.
I've never heard of them.
It would appear you've literally heard of very little on the Web except
Google and Amazon. How that's possible in 2021 is beyond me, but you
manage it.
Which, incidentally, probably explains why so many of your other posts
after finding this "Google Group" (which it really ISN'T because it's
actually a USENET NEWSGROUP that pre-dates the existence of GG by quite
possibly 20 years, and Google itself by at least a decade) are responses
to two-decade-plus-old articles whose posters are in many cases LONG
deceased.
"More things in Heaven and Earth" "Horatio", etc. (or maybe you're just
actively trying to avoid "woke alternatives" to "companies pinkos want
cancelled". Which is its own rabbit hole that I have no intention of
going down, but then guys[1] like that tend to learn the "leftist
company" names if only so they don't accidentally give them business).
And if you can't understand THAT reference, then kindly stop posting
anything.
Gee, your mean. I thought we LEFTIST LIBERALS all stayed friendly - regardless of who or what you are.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-27 14:51:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have
used the phrase. (at least that's what google search results say)
Are you putting "the brain of the matter" in quotation marks? If not,
you get a lot of irrelevant results.
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results. Searching with Google
does return some results, mostly to do with brain damage. I don't know
why there is a difference.
Because DDG is a less good search engine?
Post by Peter Moylan
One of the articles that Google found was about "foreign accent
syndrome" - the existence of which is apparently disputed - where people
speak differently after brain damage. I did once meet a young woman who
claimed that her American accent was caused by brain damage.
It's a fact that brain damage can affect speech. That it creates a "foreign
accent" was invented by people who (a) don't know what foreign accents
sound like or (b) didn't pay attention to what the effects were.
bruce bowser
2021-04-27 19:27:41 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that have
used the phrase. (at least that's what google search results say)
Are you putting "the brain of the matter" in quotation marks? If not,
you get a lot of irrelevant results.
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results. Searching with Google
does return some results, mostly to do with brain damage. I don't know
why there is a difference.
Because DDG is a less good search engine?
I guess they think that you're being spied on if you get too many returns on your search engine.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-27 23:26:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Dingbat
Post by bruce bowser
What's the difference between the two phrases?
The latter isn't a phrase unless you have water on your brain.
... include me along with 666,000 other people on websites that
have used the phrase. (at least that's what google search
results say)
Are you putting "the brain of the matter" in quotation marks? If
not, you get a lot of irrelevant results.
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results. Searching with
Google does return some results, mostly to do with brain damage. I
don't know why there is a difference.
Because DDG is a less good search engine?
It's a trade-off. Google gives more results for this example, and it's
conceivable that it's more complete overall. But you pay a big price for
using Google, because it tracks every search you do. Supposedly it's
only selling your personal details to advertisers, but have you ever
wondered why scammers know so much about you?
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-28 14:21:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results. Searching with
Google does return some results, mostly to do with brain damage. I
don't know why there is a difference.
Because DDG is a less good search engine?
It's a trade-off. Google gives more results for this example, and it's
conceivable that it's more complete overall. But you pay a big price for
using Google, because it tracks every search you do. Supposedly it's
only selling your personal details to advertisers, but have you ever
wondered why scammers know so much about you?
Either I don't get any such communications, or Verizon Yahoo! Mail
does such a good filtering job that nothing identifiably personalized
shows up in my Spam folder.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-29 00:27:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results. Searching with
Google does return some results, mostly to do with brain damage. I
don't know why there is a difference.
Because DDG is a less good search engine?
It's a trade-off. Google gives more results for this example, and it's
conceivable that it's more complete overall. But you pay a big price for
using Google, because it tracks every search you do. Supposedly it's
only selling your personal details to advertisers, but have you ever
wondered why scammers know so much about you?
Either I don't get any such communications, or Verizon Yahoo! Mail
does such a good filtering job that nothing identifiably personalized
shows up in my Spam folder.
No phone calls?
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Tony Cooper
2021-04-29 03:52:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 11:27:42 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Still, there does seem to be a difference in search engines here.
Searching with DuckDuckGo returns zero results. Searching with
Google does return some results, mostly to do with brain damage. I
don't know why there is a difference.
Because DDG is a less good search engine?
It's a trade-off. Google gives more results for this example, and it's
conceivable that it's more complete overall. But you pay a big price for
using Google, because it tracks every search you do. Supposedly it's
only selling your personal details to advertisers, but have you ever
wondered why scammers know so much about you?
Either I don't get any such communications, or Verizon Yahoo! Mail
does such a good filtering job that nothing identifiably personalized
shows up in my Spam folder.
No phone calls?
I receive "spam" phone calls, but I don't think they have anything to
do with Google. Most are "robo" calls done with machines that dial
numbers in sequence and have nothing to do with my history on the
internet or anything else.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-29 11:52:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 11:27:42 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Either I don't get any such communications, or Verizon Yahoo! Mail
does such a good filtering job that nothing identifiably personalized
shows up in my Spam folder.
No phone calls?
I receive "spam" phone calls, but I don't think they have anything to
do with Google. Most are "robo" calls done with machines that dial
numbers in sequence and have nothing to do with my history on the
internet or anything else.
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people with
Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply, almost
entirely.

I get the same handful of robocalls daily.

Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
phrases; the way to defeat them is to reply something unexpected:
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it simply
replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to hang up.)
charles
2021-04-29 12:40:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 11:27:42 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Either I don't get any such communications, or Verizon Yahoo! Mail
does such a good filtering job that nothing identifiably personalized
shows up in my Spam folder.
No phone calls?
I receive "spam" phone calls, but I don't think they have anything to
do with Google. Most are "robo" calls done with machines that dial
numbers in sequence and have nothing to do with my history on the
internet or anything else.
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people with
Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply, almost
entirely.
still here in plenty.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it simply
replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to hang up.)
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-29 14:35:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 11:27:42 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Either I don't get any such communications, or Verizon Yahoo! Mail
does such a good filtering job that nothing identifiably personalized
shows up in my Spam folder.
No phone calls?
I receive "spam" phone calls, but I don't think they have anything to
do with Google. Most are "robo" calls done with machines that dial
numbers in sequence and have nothing to do with my history on the
internet or anything else.
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people with
Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply, almost
entirely.
still here in plenty.
Do yours have British names? Nigels and Nathans and such?
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it simply
replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to hang up.)
charles
2021-04-29 15:37:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 29 Apr 2021 11:27:42 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Either I don't get any such communications, or Verizon Yahoo!
Mail does such a good filtering job that nothing identifiably
personalized shows up in my Spam folder.
No phone calls?
I receive "spam" phone calls, but I don't think they have anything
to do with Google. Most are "robo" calls done with machines that
dial numbers in sequence and have nothing to do with my history on
the internet or anything else.
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people with
Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply, almost
entirely.
still here in plenty.
Do yours have British names? Nigels and Nathans and such?
This morning's one was James and I can recall an Andrew
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
phrases; the way to defeat them is to reply something unexpected: "Is
this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it simply
replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to hang up.)
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-29 19:31:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people with
Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply, almost
entirely.
still here in plenty.
Do yours have British names? Nigels and Nathans and such?
This morning's one was James and I can recall an Andrew
Hm. Those wouldn't sound at all odd Over Here. You can't go wrong
with Apostles!
Peter Moylan
2021-04-30 00:42:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people
with Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply,
almost entirely.
still here in plenty.
Do yours have British names? Nigels and Nathans and such?
This morning's one was James and I can recall an Andrew
I certainly hear names that don't sound at all Indian. Sometimes they
throw in a place name: "This is Antony, calling from Melbourne". If one
is in the mood, that's the time to to throw in a response like "Oh, how
are you handling the floods?" Of course they have no idea whether there
have been floods in Melbourne.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-30 18:46:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people
with Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply,
almost entirely.
still here in plenty.
Do yours have British names? Nigels and Nathans and such?
This morning's one was James and I can recall an Andrew
I certainly hear names that don't sound at all Indian. Sometimes they
throw in a place name: "This is Antony, calling from Melbourne". If one
is in the mood, that's the time to to throw in a response like "Oh, how
are you handling the floods?" Of course they have no idea whether there
have been floods in Melbourne.
T'was once said that those call-centres displayed location-related time
& weather information, in order for their 'agents' to sound more credible.

Perhaps they develop a complete back-story for each one of them. Place
of Birth, schools attended, hobbies, favourite pub etc. etc.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Tony Cooper
2021-04-30 19:34:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people
with Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply,
almost entirely.
still here in plenty.
Do yours have British names? Nigels and Nathans and such?
This morning's one was James and I can recall an Andrew
I certainly hear names that don't sound at all Indian. Sometimes they
throw in a place name: "This is Antony, calling from Melbourne". If one
is in the mood, that's the time to to throw in a response like "Oh, how
are you handling the floods?" Of course they have no idea whether there
have been floods in Melbourne.
T'was once said that those call-centres displayed location-related time
& weather information, in order for their 'agents' to sound more credible.
Perhaps they develop a complete back-story for each one of them. Place
of Birth, schools attended, hobbies, favourite pub etc. etc.
Drifting a bit, but on the subject of "call-centres".

I just got off a long telephone call with AT&T regarding an
unexplained "one-time charge" on my mobile phone bill of $20.

The person at the other end was a female that spoke in a
heavily-accented voice. Asian, but not Indian, I think. I had to
have her repeat everything multiple times. She was evidently trying
to be helpful, but it was a frustrating experience for me. It made me
feel rude and ugly-Americanish to ask her to repeat everything, but I
wasn't about to be charged for that $20 unless given a reason for it.

After about 15 minutes of the exchange, she couldn't find out what the
charge was for, and ended up giving me credit for $20 to be applied to
my next month's bill.

I am convinced that AT&T deliberately uses call-centers manned
(wommaned) by speakers who cannot be understood so the customer will
finally give up, hang up, and accept the charge. This way they can
stick an extra $20 on a bill for no reason and get away with it.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-01 00:11:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Drifting a bit, but on the subject of "call-centres".
I just got off a long telephone call with AT&T regarding an
unexplained "one-time charge" on my mobile phone bill of $20.
The person at the other end was a female that spoke in a
heavily-accented voice. Asian, but not Indian, I think. I had to
have her repeat everything multiple times. She was evidently trying
to be helpful, but it was a frustrating experience for me. It made me
feel rude and ugly-Americanish to ask her to repeat everything, but I
wasn't about to be charged for that $20 unless given a reason for it.
After about 15 minutes of the exchange, she couldn't find out what the
charge was for, and ended up giving me credit for $20 to be applied to
my next month's bill.
I am convinced that AT&T deliberately uses call-centers manned
(wommaned) by speakers who cannot be understood so the customer will
finally give up, hang up, and accept the charge. This way they can
stick an extra $20 on a bill for no reason and get away with it.
Do you have to pay for that call to their call centre?

I'm beginning to prefer those on-line text "chat" things, when trying to
resolve problems like that.
The person (assuming you do get a person & not a 'bot) usually speaks
some other variant of English, but that's less of a problem in the
written form - and you can then keep an exact record of the
'conversation' in case they sort of forget what they agreed to do.
It's fairly easy to ignore the flowery boilerplate customer-stroking
phrases when they're in print.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Stefan Ram
2021-05-01 00:16:13 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
It's fairly easy to ignore the flowery boilerplate customer-stroking
phrases when they're in print.
The best episode of South Park centers around:

|Did I take care of all your customer needs
|in a timely and satisfactory fashion today?

.
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-05-01 20:09:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 1 May 2021 00:16:13 GMT
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Sam Plusnet
It's fairly easy to ignore the flowery boilerplate customer-stroking
phrases when they're in print.
|Did I take care of all your customer needs
|in a timely and satisfactory fashion today?
.
Nice sig! ^


I get follow-up emails asking to "rate my experience". PS My smartmeter saga is still on-going. (No gas readings - As If Anyone Cared </Emo>)
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Paul Wolff
2021-05-01 22:42:56 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Sam Plusnet
It's fairly easy to ignore the flowery boilerplate customer-stroking
phrases when they're in print.
|Did I take care of all your customer needs
|in a timely and satisfactory fashion today?
Nice sig! ^
I get follow-up emails asking to "rate my experience". PS My smartmeter
saga is still on-going. (No gas readings - As If Anyone Cared </Emo>)
I do, I do. I have two smartmeters and neither reads the gas meter
because the utility company (SSE) that installed them isn't very clever.

Or perhaps I don't care, after all.
--
Paul
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-05-02 16:05:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 1 May 2021 23:42:56 +0100
[]
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
I get follow-up emails asking to "rate my experience". PS My smartmeter
saga is still on-going. (No gas readings - As If Anyone Cared </Emo>)
I do, I do. I have two smartmeters and neither reads the gas meter
because the utility company (SSE) that installed them isn't very clever.
Or perhaps I don't care, after all.
There seems to a huge communication/knowledge gap between the bill provider and the meter install people [SMS]. But I'll try not to rant about it here. (too late?)
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Tony Cooper
2021-05-01 00:47:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
Drifting a bit, but on the subject of "call-centres".
I just got off a long telephone call with AT&T regarding an
unexplained "one-time charge" on my mobile phone bill of $20.
The person at the other end was a female that spoke in a
heavily-accented voice. Asian, but not Indian, I think. I had to
have her repeat everything multiple times. She was evidently trying
to be helpful, but it was a frustrating experience for me. It made me
feel rude and ugly-Americanish to ask her to repeat everything, but I
wasn't about to be charged for that $20 unless given a reason for it.
After about 15 minutes of the exchange, she couldn't find out what the
charge was for, and ended up giving me credit for $20 to be applied to
my next month's bill.
I am convinced that AT&T deliberately uses call-centers manned
(wommaned) by speakers who cannot be understood so the customer will
finally give up, hang up, and accept the charge. This way they can
stick an extra $20 on a bill for no reason and get away with it.
Do you have to pay for that call to their call centre?
I'm beginning to prefer those on-line text "chat" things, when trying to
resolve problems like that.
The person (assuming you do get a person & not a 'bot) usually speaks
some other variant of English, but that's less of a problem in the
written form - and you can then keep an exact record of the
'conversation' in case they sort of forget what they agreed to do.
It's fairly easy to ignore the flowery boilerplate customer-stroking
phrases when they're in print.
No. If it's a call to a US number that is routed by the telephone
company to some foreign location, the US call is free to me anywhere
in the US. Often, though, the number is a toll-free number. My call
today was to an 800 toll-free number.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 03:53:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Drifting a bit, but on the subject of "call-centres".
Turning another right angle:

A while back I heard of a company who had hired an Indian man. After a
while they had to take him off making phone calls to customers, because
people would hang up any time they heard an Indian accent.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-05-01 20:06:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021 19:46:15 +0100
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Ditto. Now you mention it, the number of calls from people
with Indian accents and American names has dropped sharply,
almost entirely.
still here in plenty.
Do yours have British names? Nigels and Nathans and such?
This morning's one was James and I can recall an Andrew
I certainly hear names that don't sound at all Indian. Sometimes they
throw in a place name: "This is Antony, calling from Melbourne". If one
is in the mood, that's the time to to throw in a response like "Oh, how
are you handling the floods?" Of course they have no idea whether there
have been floods in Melbourne.
T'was once said that those call-centres displayed location-related time
& weather information, in order for their 'agents' to sound more credible.
Perhaps they develop a complete back-story for each one of them. Place
of Birth, schools attended, hobbies, favourite pub etc. etc.
This sounds like
a) a deep conspiracy
or^w and therefore!
b) a cunning murder-mystery plot-twist. [YRIHF]

What floods?
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-30 00:47:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it
simply replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to
hang up.)
If I have the time, I prefer not to hang up until they do. Keeping them
engaged reduces their number of victims/day.

I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on the
line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start insulting
them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as loudly as I
could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not obvious where I
could buy a good loud whistle.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Tony Cooper
2021-04-30 02:56:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021 11:47:27 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it
simply replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to
hang up.)
If I have the time, I prefer not to hang up until they do. Keeping them
engaged reduces their number of victims/day.
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on the
line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start insulting
them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as loudly as I
could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not obvious where I
could buy a good loud whistle.
The "live" spam calls I get from people with Indian accents are mostly
from those who want to lend me money. They are getting my name and
phone number from Florida public records of business registrations . I
haven't owned a business for 15 years, but the records are evidently
still available. (I have had the same mobile number for something
like 30 years. I have it ported when I change providers.)

Obviously, the "lend me money" approach is to obtain my bank details
so they can transfer money to that account. I keep them on the line
until I get tired of playing with them.

Once in a while it's the "We've noticed a problem with your computer"
scam, but I haven't got that one for a while.

The calls trying to sell me solar panels are US in origin. Probably
from incarcerated people in prison.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Graham
2021-04-30 03:22:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021 11:47:27 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it
simply replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to
hang up.)
If I have the time, I prefer not to hang up until they do. Keeping them
engaged reduces their number of victims/day.
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on the
line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start insulting
them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as loudly as I
could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not obvious where I
could buy a good loud whistle.
The "live" spam calls I get from people with Indian accents are mostly
from those who want to lend me money. They are getting my name and
phone number from Florida public records of business registrations . I
haven't owned a business for 15 years, but the records are evidently
still available. (I have had the same mobile number for something
like 30 years. I have it ported when I change providers.)
Obviously, the "lend me money" approach is to obtain my bank details
so they can transfer money to that account. I keep them on the line
until I get tired of playing with them.
Once in a while it's the "We've noticed a problem with your computer"
scam, but I haven't got that one for a while.
The calls trying to sell me solar panels are US in origin. Probably
from incarcerated people in prison.
I aked one of these scammers if his Mother knew what he did for a
living. He obviously mis-heard and kept calling back for the next half hour.
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-30 18:50:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
I aked one of these scammers if his Mother knew what he did for a
living. He obviously mis-heard and kept calling back for the next half hour.
He probably comes from a criminal family. Granny shoplifts and his
brothers rig road accidents for the insurance money, whilst his sisters...
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
bruce bowser
2021-04-30 19:32:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
I aked one of these scammers if his Mother knew what he did for a
living. He obviously mis-heard and kept calling back for the next half hour.
He probably comes from a criminal family. Granny shoplifts and his
brothers rig road accidents for the insurance money, whilst his sisters...
But take heart, criminal families that steal enough either go to jail or they join the world's billionaire ranks.
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 04:01:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Graham
I aked one of these scammers if his Mother knew what he did for a
living. He obviously mis-heard and kept calling back for the next half hour.
He probably comes from a criminal family. Granny shoplifts and his
brothers rig road accidents for the insurance money, whilst his sisters...
Our house was once burgled by three children. The oldest would have been
about fourteen years old.

Subsequently, my wife had to go to the police station to identify some
jewellery. While she was there, the mother of the children turned up. It
turned out that she had a history of armed robbery. It seemed pretty
likely that she had been training her children in house-breaking.

We were lucky that they were caught. Someone living half a block away
had noticed three children going along our street, looking up every
driveway. When they turned into our driveway (we weren't home) he
immediately called the police. They arrived so quickly that one of the
kids was still stuck halfway through a window.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-01 14:11:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Our house was once burgled by three children. The oldest would have been
about fourteen years old.
Subsequently, my wife had to go to the police station to identify some
jewellery. While she was there, the mother of the children turned up. It
turned out that she had a history of armed robbery. It seemed pretty
likely that she had been training her children in house-breaking.
We were lucky that they were caught. Someone living half a block away
had noticed three children going along our street, looking up every
driveway. When they turned into our driveway (we weren't home) he
immediately called the police. They arrived so quickly that one of the
kids was still stuck halfway through a window.
How Dickensian!
Tony Cooper
2021-05-01 15:31:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 1 May 2021 07:11:43 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Our house was once burgled by three children. The oldest would have been
about fourteen years old.
Subsequently, my wife had to go to the police station to identify some
jewellery. While she was there, the mother of the children turned up. It
turned out that she had a history of armed robbery. It seemed pretty
likely that she had been training her children in house-breaking.
We were lucky that they were caught. Someone living half a block away
had noticed three children going along our street, looking up every
driveway. When they turned into our driveway (we weren't home) he
immediately called the police. They arrived so quickly that one of the
kids was still stuck halfway through a window.
How Dickensian!
You think PM is fagin it?
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-05-01 20:13:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 01 May 2021 11:31:02 -0400
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 1 May 2021 07:11:43 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Our house was once burgled by three children. The oldest would have been
about fourteen years old.
Subsequently, my wife had to go to the police station to identify some
jewellery. While she was there, the mother of the children turned up. It
turned out that she had a history of armed robbery. It seemed pretty
likely that she had been training her children in house-breaking.
We were lucky that they were caught. Someone living half a block away
had noticed three children going along our street, looking up every
driveway. When they turned into our driveway (we weren't home) he
immediately called the police. They arrived so quickly that one of the
kids was still stuck halfway through a window.
How Dickensian!
You think PM is fagin it?
Another plot Twist. I hope he doesn't live in a Bleak House.
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-30 14:59:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
The "live" spam calls I get from people with Indian accents are mostly
from those who want to lend me money. They are getting my name and
phone number from Florida public records of business registrations . I
haven't owned a business for 15 years, but the records are evidently
still available. (I have had the same mobile number for something
like 30 years. I have it ported when I change providers.)
Obviously, the "lend me money" approach is to obtain my bank details
so they can transfer money to that account. I keep them on the line
until I get tired of playing with them.
Once in a while it's the "We've noticed a problem with your computer"
scam, but I haven't got that one for a while.
The calls trying to sell me solar panels are US in origin. Probably
from incarcerated people in prison.
The most common robocall recently has been amazon: "we have charged
$399 (or $999) to your Amazon Prime account, please press 1 to verify
the charge." Only, I don't have an Amazon Prime account.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-04-30 08:12:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it
simply replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to
hang up.)
If I have the time, I prefer not to hang up until they do. Keeping them
engaged reduces their number of victims/day.
I once tried to last 30 minutes before announcing to the chap from
Microsoft who phoned about a problem they had identified with my
Windows computer that I don't possess a Windows computer. I only lasted
about 5 minutes befor throwing in the towel.
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on the
line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start insulting
them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as loudly as I
could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not obvious where I
could buy a good loud whistle.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
bruce bowser
2021-05-01 19:45:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it
simply replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to
hang up.)
If I have the time, I prefer not to hang up until they do. Keeping them
engaged reduces their number of victims/day.
I once tried to last 30 minutes before announcing to the chap from
Microsoft who phoned about a problem they had identified with my
Windows computer that I don't possess a Windows computer. I only lasted
about 5 minutes befor throwing in the towel.
I've often wondered about how computer servicing differs in France compared to the USA.
Paul Wolff
2021-04-30 13:54:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021, at 11:47:27, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it
simply replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to
hang up.)
If I have the time, I prefer not to hang up until they do. Keeping them
engaged reduces their number of victims/day.
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on the
line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start insulting
them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as loudly as I
could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not obvious where I
could buy a good loud whistle.
Hold your phone up to your smoke alarm, then press the 'test' button.
--
Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-30 14:56:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I get the same handful of robocalls daily.
Worst are the ones where a human voice has recorded some stock
"Is this Peter?" "What if it is?" (And after several seconds, it
simply replies with the next entry in the script, and that's when to
hang up.)
If I have the time, I prefer not to hang up until they do. Keeping them
engaged reduces their number of victims/day.
That would work if there were people making the calls. Presumably
the AI script keeps going until the mark presses 1 to be connected
to an agent,
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on the
line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start insulting
them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as loudly as I
could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not obvious where I
could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 04:05:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on
the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start
insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as
loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not
obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Chrysi Cat
2021-05-01 07:48:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on
the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start
insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as
loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not
obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
The REASON they aren't used any more (concession of "two words" made for
your benefit) is because football referees found a better design with no
pea inside.

I was a (VERY BAD) USSF-certified official (I never got above grade 7)
from 1990-99, and almost all of us used these instead:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fox_40

That said, these guys are still in business as well and are more likely
to have a pea-type football-loud whistle available:

https://www.acmewhistles.co.uk/

Innit amazing how sometimes you don't even NEED to go looking for the
football club because people formerly associated with one might just
stumble 'pon your message?
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 08:50:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human
on the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to
start insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to
scream as loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle,
but it's not obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of
whistle that football referees used to use. If they were still in
use I could call up a football club for advice, but I don't think
they are.
The REASON they aren't used any more (concession of "two words" made
for your benefit) is because football referees found a better design
with no pea inside.
I was a (VERY BAD) USSF-certified official (I never got above grade
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fox_40
That said, these guys are still in business as well and are more
https://www.acmewhistles.co.uk/
Innit amazing how sometimes you don't even NEED to go looking for the
football club because people formerly associated with one might just
stumble 'pon your message?
Thanks for that. It's prompted me to look up suppliers in my area, and I
think I've found one.

Meanwhile, it's amazing how many businesses that don't sell whistles are
called "Whistles".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
bruce bowser
2021-05-01 11:55:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human
on the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to
start insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to
scream as loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle,
but it's not obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of
whistle that football referees used to use. If they were still in
use I could call up a football club for advice, but I don't think
they are.
The REASON they aren't used any more (concession of "two words" made
for your benefit) is because football referees found a better design
with no pea inside.
I was a (VERY BAD) USSF-certified official (I never got above grade
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fox_40
That said, these guys are still in business as well and are more
https://www.acmewhistles.co.uk/
Innit amazing how sometimes you don't even NEED to go looking for the
football club because people formerly associated with one might just
stumble 'pon your message?
Thanks for that. It's prompted me to look up suppliers in my area, and I
think I've found one.
Meanwhile, it's amazing how many businesses that don't sell whistles are
called "Whistles".
There's actually a restaurant in New York that's called 'Pig n Whistle'. I guess they don't sell any, either.
Quinn C
2021-05-01 23:32:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
https://www.acmewhistles.co.uk/
I looked at their hunting whistles, but strangely couldn't find a
roadrunner type one.
--
Bring home one dismembered body part, once, mind you, once,
and people get twitchy about checking your luggage ever after.
-- Vicereine Cordelia
in L. McMaster Bujold, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen
charles
2021-05-01 09:33:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on
the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start
insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as
loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not
obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might still exist.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Janet
2021-05-01 10:21:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on
the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start
insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as
loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not
obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might still exist.
You can buy very loud emergency whistles in outdoor
sports shops. Used by mountaineers.

Janet.
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 09:26:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on
the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start
insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as
loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not
obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might still exist.
You can buy very loud emergency whistles in outdoor
sports shops. Used by mountaineers.
Aha! Good advice.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Paul Wolff
2021-05-01 14:19:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real human on
the line, though. It's too hard to resist the temptation to start
insulting them. For a while, my strategy was simply to scream as
loudly as I could. I keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not
obvious where I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might still exist.
You can buy very loud emergency whistles in outdoor
sports shops. Used by mountaineers.
Aha! Good advice.
Did you try my suggestion?
--
Paul
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 23:09:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
On Thursday, April 29, 2021 at 9:47:35 PM UTC-4, Peter
Post by Peter Moylan
I don't have the patience to do this when there's a real
human on the line, though. It's too hard to resist the
temptation to start insulting them. For a while, my
strategy was simply to scream as loudly as I could. I
keep meaning to get a whistle, but it's not obvious where
I could buy a good loud whistle.
Any toy store?
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort
of whistle that football referees used to use. If they were
still in use I could call up a football club for advice, but
I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might
still exist.
You can buy very loud emergency whistles in outdoor sports shops.
Used by mountaineers.
Aha! Good advice.
Did you try my suggestion?
It's a good idea, but I need a ladder to get to the smoke alarms.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-01 18:48:15 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might still exist.
I've heard of dog whistles, which leads me to ask.

"What, exactly, happens when you blow that thing?"
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-01 20:06:38 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might still exist.
I've heard of dog whistles, which leads me to ask.
"What, exactly, happens when you blow that thing?"
Just what happens when you blow a regular one, but at a higher frequency.
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 23:10:41 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Toy whistles aren't loud enough. I was thinking of the sort of whistle
that football referees used to use. If they were still in use I could
call up a football club for advice, but I don't think they are.
my mother had a very loud "Girl Guide" whistle. They might still exist.
I've heard of dog whistles, which leads me to ask.
"What, exactly, happens when you blow that thing?"
A Girl Guide comes running.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
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