Discussion:
Chicken Parts (was: The theory of ...)
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Stefan Ram
2021-05-01 16:41:48 UTC
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...and in supermarkets, at least around here, when referring to chicken
breasts, "boneless, skinless."
Recently, I tried to find out the names for certain parts of
a chicken. I came to these conclusions:

To be most clear, use "whole chicken leg", not "chicken leg",
for a whole chicken leg, because "chicken leg" alone can
mean just the chicken drumstick.

For the same reason, prefer "chicken drumstick" to just
"chicken leg" for the drumstick.

"Chicken thigh" should refer only to the upper leg (but
it sometimes might be used to mean "whole chicken leg").

Sometimes even more meat is added, then it's a
"whole chicken leg with backbone", which also is called
"chicken leg quarter with backbone".

(While "chicken-fried" means "coated with seasoned flour
or batter and fried" as has been discussed here IIRC.)
Lewis
2021-05-01 17:54:10 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
...and in supermarkets, at least around here, when referring to chicken
breasts, "boneless, skinless."
Recently, I tried to find out the names for certain parts of
To be most clear, use "whole chicken leg", not "chicken leg",
for a whole chicken leg, because "chicken leg" alone can
mean just the chicken drumstick.
I would say a chicken leg means a drumstick and I have never seen a
chicken leg with foot attached. Even in the specialty stores, the
chicken feet are separate items.

If the thigh and drumstick are packaged together as units, which does
happen, they are labeled "whole chicken legs" even though the feet are
missing. If they are packaged together as separated items, the are
labeled "thighs and drumsticks".
Post by Stefan Ram
For the same reason, prefer "chicken drumstick" to just
"chicken leg" for the drumstick.
Drumstick by itself means chicken drumstick around here, you would have
to specify if you meant a turkey or an ice cream.
Post by Stefan Ram
"Chicken thigh" should refer only to the upper leg (but
it sometimes might be used to mean "whole chicken leg").
Not here, no, never.
Post by Stefan Ram
Sometimes even more meat is added, then it's a
"whole chicken leg with backbone", which also is called
"chicken leg quarter with backbone".
We tend to see half chicken as the next step up from a chicken leg or a
breast.
--
'What ho, b'zugda-hiara.' (Footnote: A killing insult in Dwarfish. It
means 'Lawn ornament'.) --Wyrd Sisters
Ken Blake
2021-05-01 18:21:54 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
...and in supermarkets, at least around here, when referring to chicken
breasts, "boneless, skinless."
Recently, I tried to find out the names for certain parts of
To be most clear, use "whole chicken leg", not "chicken leg",
for a whole chicken leg, because "chicken leg" alone can
mean just the chicken drumstick.
Maybe sometimes, but in my experience it almost always means thigh plus
drumstick.
Post by Stefan Ram
For the same reason, prefer "chicken drumstick" to just
"chicken leg" for the drumstick.
"Chicken thigh" should refer only to the upper leg (but
it sometimes might be used to mean "whole chicken leg").
Never, in my experience. It's always just the upper leg.
Post by Stefan Ram
Sometimes even more meat is added, then it's a
"whole chicken leg with backbone", which also is called
"chicken leg quarter with backbone".
It might be called that if that's what it was, but I've never seen
something for sale called a "chicken leg quarter with backbone." It
would look weird.
Post by Stefan Ram
(While "chicken-fried" means "coated with seasoned flour
or batter and fried" as has been discussed here IIRC.)
Yes, but two points:

1. That has nothing to do with names for "certain parts of a chicken,"
as you said your post was about.

2. as far as I know, "chicken-fried" only refers to steak--steak fried
the same way chicken usually is. I suppose you could chicken-fry other
things--pork chops, for example--but I've never seen the term used for
anything but steak.
--
Ken
Stefan Ram
2021-05-01 19:01:36 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Stefan Ram
"Chicken thigh" should refer only to the upper leg (but
it sometimes might be used to mean "whole chicken leg").
Never, in my experience. It's always just the upper leg.
"Chicken thigh" often is given as a translation of
the German word "Hähnchenschenkel" (= "whole chicken leg"),
so some dictionaries might be wrong insofar.
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Stefan Ram
(While "chicken-fried" means "coated with seasoned flour
or batter and fried" as has been discussed here IIRC.)
1. That has nothing to do with names for "certain parts of a chicken,"
as you said your post was about.
I had hoped that bracketing might mitigate the severity of
this violation.
Ken Blake
2021-05-01 19:07:13 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Stefan Ram
"Chicken thigh" should refer only to the upper leg (but
it sometimes might be used to mean "whole chicken leg").
Never, in my experience. It's always just the upper leg.
"Chicken thigh" often is given as a translation of
the German word "Hähnchenschenkel" (= "whole chicken leg"),
so some dictionaries might be wrong insofar.
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Stefan Ram
(While "chicken-fried" means "coated with seasoned flour
or batter and fried" as has been discussed here IIRC.)
1. That has nothing to do with names for "certain parts of a chicken,"
as you said your post was about.
I had hoped that bracketing might mitigate the severity of
this violation.
"Violation" is much too strong a word, as is "severity." No big deal. I
was just pointing out that that mildly confused me at first
--
Ken
Joy Beeson
2021-05-06 06:19:35 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
2. as far as I know, "chicken-fried" only refers to steak--steak fried
the same way chicken usually is. I suppose you could chicken-fry other
things--pork chops, for example--but I've never seen the term used for
anything but steak.
I *think* that a chicken-fried pork chop is pork schnitzel.

"Tenderloin", on the other hand, is french fried, not chicken-fried.

Sigh. I had a chance to order tenderloin yesterday, but chose Philly
Steak instead. It may be another year before I have another excuse to
order a sandwich big enough to founder two people.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at centurylink dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
Stefan Ram
2021-05-06 16:55:24 UTC
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Post by Joy Beeson
I *think* that a chicken-fried pork chop is pork schnitzel.
By and large, yes. Chicken-fried pork chops are more often
served with a kind of remoulade sauce, while the pork cutlets
are supposed to be thinly pounded in the case of a pork schnitzel,
which then is served with slices of lemon and fresh parsley sprigs.
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