Discussion:
tipped (for the top)
(too old to reply)
Rich Ulrich
2020-01-07 20:57:54 UTC
Permalink
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.

I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.

"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.

To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.

I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
--
Rich Ulrich
Spains Harden
2020-01-07 21:25:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.
I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.
"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.
To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.
I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
Nothing unremarkable in BrE.
Horace LaBadie
2020-01-07 22:50:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.
I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.
"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.
To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.
I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
The phrase "tipped for the position/job" is common in news reports about
people who have been selected or are under consideration for selection.
Tony Cooper
2020-01-08 00:04:00 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 07 Jan 2020 15:57:54 -0500, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.
I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.
"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.
To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.
I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
If you get a tip on a horse or a stock, someone has predicted that the
horse or the stock will be a winner in the future. If many people are
telling others that the horse or the stock is predicted to be a
winner, it's being tipped.

I wouldn't consider stock tips to be in the sports arena.

Use of the term implies predicting a winner of something. We can be
given a lot of tips on how to do things better, but sports tips and
stock market tips can result in definable winners, so the term isn't
as much "confined" as it is "commonly applicable".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ross
2020-01-08 00:09:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.
I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.
"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.
To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.
I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
--
Rich Ulrich
OED:
tip v.5
1. transitive. To give a ‘tip’ or piece of private information about; esp. to mention or indicate as
a probable winner, a profitable speculation, etc.
[from 1883]
Early citations are all about sports, but from 1902
extend into the share market. (Unfortunately this
unrevised entry does not extend far into the 20th century.)
Ross
2020-01-08 00:22:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by Rich Ulrich
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.
I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.
"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.
To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.
I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
--
Rich Ulrich
tip v.5
1. transitive. To give a ‘tip’ or piece of private information about; esp. to mention or indicate as
a probable winner, a profitable speculation, etc.
[from 1883]
Early citations are all about sports, but from 1902
extend into the share market. (Unfortunately this
unrevised entry does not extend far into the 20th century.)
FWIW, I hear it commonly in NZ used of people likely
to get important jobs, government appointments, literary
prizes, etc.
Tony Cooper
2020-01-08 01:50:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by Ross
Post by Rich Ulrich
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.
I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.
"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.
To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.
I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
--
Rich Ulrich
tip v.5
1. transitive. To give a ‘tip’ or piece of private information about; esp. to mention or indicate as
a probable winner, a profitable speculation, etc.
[from 1883]
Early citations are all about sports, but from 1902
extend into the share market. (Unfortunately this
unrevised entry does not extend far into the 20th century.)
FWIW, I hear it commonly in NZ used of people likely
to get important jobs, government appointments, literary
prizes, etc.
And in the UK:
https://www.theguardian.com/books/2018/oct/16/man-booker-prize-daisy-johnson-tipped-to-be-youngest-ever-winner
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Rich Ulrich
2020-01-08 17:37:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross
Post by Ross
Post by Rich Ulrich
Here's a UK usage that I just ran into for the first time - "tipped
for the top." That was a description given for Coco Gauff, the
15-year-old tennis sensation of the 2019 Wimbledon after she
defeated Venus Williams.
I might not have cited "tipped", except that the same
news page, metro.co.uk, used it again in a link to another article.
"Leighton Bennett makes his debut in the BDO World Championship on
Tuesday night with more fanfare than most, because he is just
14-years-old and is being tipped to become one of the greatest
players in the history of darts.
To me, "tipped" suggests the words of a tipster, instead of
being "touted" by a tout. A little different from being predicted.
I wonder if this one has been around for long, and if it
is confined to sports.
--
Rich Ulrich
tip v.5
1. transitive. To give a ‘tip’ or piece of private information about; esp. to mention or indicate as
a probable winner, a profitable speculation, etc.
[from 1883]
Early citations are all about sports, but from 1902
extend into the share market. (Unfortunately this
unrevised entry does not extend far into the 20th century.)
FWIW, I hear it commonly in NZ used of people likely
to get important jobs, government appointments, literary
prizes, etc.
Thanks, all.

I didn't have trouble understanding it, but I didn't
recognize it as a commonplace expression. It's not, here.

It didn't occur to me to post about it until I saw it twice
on the same page -- I suspect, now, that I could have
seen it in the past, absorbed the meaning and quickly
forgot about it.
--
Rich Ulrich
Loading...