Discussion:
AmE "I am trying to get through"
Add Reply
S K
2021-04-28 11:48:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
does it mean "I am trying to make sense of the world"?
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-28 12:13:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by S K
does it mean "I am trying to make sense of the world"?
Not without CONTEXT it doesn't.

It's at least as likely to mean "I am trying to successfully contact [x
person]."
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter Moylan
2021-04-29 00:25:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by S K
does it mean "I am trying to make sense of the world"?
Not without CONTEXT it doesn't.
It's at least as likely to mean "I am trying to successfully contact [x
person]."
No, it means "This hole in the fence is a really tight fit".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Dingbat
2021-04-29 07:20:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by S K
does it mean "I am trying to make sense of the world"?
An asinine interpretation.

It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road. Inexplicably, however,
a road can be called a throughfare or thoroughfare.
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/throughfare
s***@my-deja.com
2021-04-29 10:02:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road.
... except if you are travelling between Edinburgh and Glasgow.
Dingbat
2021-04-29 23:29:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road.
... except if you are travelling between Edinburgh and Glasgow.
What is special about that route?
s***@my-deja.com
2021-04-29 23:50:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road.
... except if you are travelling between Edinburgh and Glasgow.
What is special about that route?
The fact that the locals talk about going "through" to the other city.
I was surprised when I first heard the usage. I would have said
"over" or "across" as it is a east/west journey
Dingbat
2021-04-30 01:11:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road.
... except if you are travelling between Edinburgh and Glasgow.
What is special about that route?
The fact that the locals talk about going "through" to the other city.
I was surprised when I first heard the usage. I would have said
"over" or "across" as it is a east/west journey
There are as many as 5 train routes, some with many stops.
https://citymonitor.ai/transport/how-can-you-travel-between-edinburgh-and-glasgow-let-me-count-ways-4432
Perhaps there's a through service with few stops. The same might apply to coach vs bus service. The coach would be a through service with no intermediate stops while bus services would have many stops.
s***@my-deja.com
2021-04-30 01:25:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road.
... except if you are travelling between Edinburgh and Glasgow.
What is special about that route?
The fact that the locals talk about going "through" to the other city.
I was surprised when I first heard the usage. I would have said
"over" or "across" as it is a east/west journey
There are as many as 5 train routes, some with many stops.
https://citymonitor.ai/transport/how-can-you-travel-between-edinburgh-and-glasgow-let-me-count-ways-4432
Perhaps there's a through service with few stops.
The same might apply to coach vs bus service. The coach would be a
through service with no intermediate stops while bus services would have many stops.
True but not the point.

The locals talk about going "through" to the other city, irrespective of the means of transport.
I do not know why this is so. Standard BrE would use "over" or "across".
Peter Moylan
2021-04-30 00:54:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road.
... except if you are travelling between Edinburgh and
Glasgow.
What is special about that route?
The fact that the locals talk about going "through" to the other
city. I was surprised when I first heard the usage. I would have
said "over" or "across" as it is a east/west journey
There are as many as 5 train routes, some with many stops.
https://citymonitor.ai/transport/how-can-you-travel-between-edinburgh-and-glasgow-let-me-count-ways-4432
Perhaps there's a through service with few stops.
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
The same might apply to coach vs bus service. The coach would be a
through service with no intermediate stops while bus services would have many stops.
True but not the point.
The locals talk about going "through" to the other city, irrespective
of the means of transport. I do not know why this is so. Standard BrE
would use "over" or "across".
I've been told by more than one person that Glaswegians and Edinburgers
do no like each other. Perhaps the "through" refers to piercing through
the bubble that keeps the cultures separate.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
CDB
2021-04-30 11:57:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 4/29/2021 8:54 PM, Peter Moylan wrote:

[through the rye, maybe]
Post by Peter Moylan
I've been told by more than one person that Glaswegians and
Edinburgers do no like each other. Perhaps the "through" refers to
piercing through the bubble that keeps the cultures separate.
Edinbros?

Lewis
2021-04-30 06:43:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Dingbat
It doesn't mean getting anywhere by road.
... except if you are travelling between Edinburgh and Glasgow.
What is special about that route?
The fact that the locals talk about going "through" to the other city.
I was surprised when I first heard the usage. I would have said
"over" or "across" as it is a east/west journey
There are as many as 5 train routes, some with many stops.
https://citymonitor.ai/transport/how-can-you-travel-between-edinburgh-and-glasgow-let-me-count-ways-4432
Perhaps there's a through service with few stops.
The same might apply to coach vs bus service. The coach would be a
through service with no intermediate stops while bus services would have many stops.
True but not the point.
The locals talk about going "through" to the other city, irrespective
of the means of transport. I do not know why this is so. Standard BrE
would use "over" or "across".
Over is used in AmE as well, though I am not sure what the exact
circumstances are. When I first moved here I thought maybe it was to do
with our mountains, but that seems not to be the case all the time. But
certainly we "go over" to Craig or Grand Junction, so it may be an
east-west journey rather than an elevation one.

And, of course, you "go over" to someone's house and you might "go over"
to a store or to a location where there are several individual places
you will go to.

When does one go over to the hardware store (or run over) instead of
simply going to the hardware store? When it is a quick trip to get one
or two items needed for a task at hand.

"We need some duct tape."

"OK, I’ll go to the hardware store tomorrow and get some."

"We need it now, the ducks are escaping the ducts!"

"Ah, I'll run over and get some now."
--
These budget numbers are not just estimates, these are the actual
results for the fiscal year that ended February the 30th. - GWB
Loading...