Discussion:
just one weekend over Labor Day
(too old to reply)
tonbei
2019-12-01 12:48:30 UTC
Permalink
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.

I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor Day.
(Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)

context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to stay for work somewhere else for a while.
She regretted that she hadn't been there at her office when she should have.
question: about "over Labor Day"
What I guess is it means: she came back to Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from there.
but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are related.

Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.

Am I right?
Peter Moylan
2019-12-01 14:20:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor
Day. (Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to
stay for work somewhere else for a while. She regretted that she
about "over Labor Day" What I guess is it means: she came back to
Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from
there. but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are
related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among
that one weekend when she came back. She stayed during the weekend,
and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
"One weekend over Labor Day" simply means a weekend that includes Labor
Day. Depending on local laws, that might include the Friday or the Monday.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-01 15:29:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor
Day. (Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to
stay for work somewhere else for a while. She regretted that she
about "over Labor Day" What I guess is it means: she came back to
Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from
there. but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are
related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among
that one weekend when she came back. She stayed during the weekend,
and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
"One weekend over Labor Day" simply means a weekend that includes Labor
Day. Depending on local laws, that might include the Friday or the Monday.
Labor Day in Massachusetts (and everywhere else in the US, it's a Federal
holiday) is the first Monday after the first Sunday in September -- that
is, it can fall on any date from September 2 to September 8.
CDB
2019-12-01 18:38:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor
Day. (Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to
stay for work somewhere else for a while. She regretted that she
about "over Labor Day" What I guess is it means: she came back to
Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from
there. but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are
related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among
that one weekend when she came back. She stayed during the
weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
"One weekend over Labor Day" simply means a weekend that includes
Labor Day. Depending on local laws, that might include the Friday or
the Monday.
As Peter has said, Labo(u)r Day is always a Monday, in his country and
in mine.

The phrasing is a little fudged: she (Scarpetta, probably) was in in
Massachusetts over the Labour Day long weekend, which she calls "Labor
Day", probably because she has already said "weekend". That would be
perfectly natural in speech, so this is not a criticism of Ms Cornwell's
style, for once.
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-01 19:31:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor
Day. (Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to
stay for work somewhere else for a while. She regretted that she
about "over Labor Day" What I guess is it means: she came back to
Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from
there. but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are
related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among
that one weekend when she came back. She stayed during the
weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
"One weekend over Labor Day" simply means a weekend that includes
Labor Day. Depending on local laws, that might include the Friday or
the Monday.
As Peter has said, Labo(u)r Day is always a Monday, in his country and
in mine.
The phrasing is a little fudged: she (Scarpetta, probably) was in in
Massachusetts over the Labour Day long weekend, which she calls "Labor
Day", probably because she has already said "weekend". That would be
perfectly natural in speech, so this is not a criticism of Ms Cornwell's
style, for once.
It implies that she probably would not have been working during those
three days in any case, it being a state and federal three-day holiday.
Ken Blake
2019-12-01 19:03:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor Day.
(Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to stay for work somewhere else for a while.
She regretted that she hadn't been there at her office when she should have.
question: about "over Labor Day"
What I guess is it means: she came back to Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from there.
but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Yes, you are right.
--
Ken
b***@aol.com
2019-12-01 20:45:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor Day.
(Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to stay for work somewhere else for a while.
She regretted that she hadn't been there at her office when she should have.
question: about "over Labor Day"
What I guess is it means: she came back to Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from there.
but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper. The distinction is important as, for instance, in France
the equivalent of Labor Day ("Fête du travail") is a fixed date, i.e.
the 1st of May, and so may very well fall on a Saturday or Sunday - in which
case it's actually included in the weekend itself. Incidentally, this can be
a subject of litigation between employers and employees, as an extra day off
can be granted at the employer's discretion but is not guaranteed by law.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-01 21:07:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor Day.
(Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to stay for work somewhere else for a while.
She regretted that she hadn't been there at her office when she should have.
question: about "over Labor Day"
What I guess is it means: she came back to Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from there.
but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."

That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.

Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
Post by b***@aol.com
The distinction is important as, for instance, in France
the equivalent of Labor Day ("Fête du travail") is a fixed date, i.e.
the 1st of May, and so may very well fall on a Saturday or Sunday - in which
case it's actually included in the weekend itself.
And is not relevant in the slightest. Fixed-day holidays -- Christmas
and New Year's Day, the Fourth of July, and Veterans Day -- either do
or do not yield an extended weekend; but if they fall on a Saturday or
Sunday, normally a compensatory day off is awarded (usually on Monday.
NB we don't do "Boxing Day.")
Horace LaBadie
2019-12-01 22:12:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor Day.
(Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to stay
for work somewhere else for a while.
She regretted that she hadn't been there at her office when she
should have.
question: about "over Labor Day"
What I guess is it means: she came back to Massachusetts just one
weekend while she was working away from there.
but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that
one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations. But "weekend" means "Saturday and Sunday", whether
in English or French.
Labor Day Weekend is the proper term, and it is understood to be three
days in length.

Does the movement to a four-day work week mean that the extra day off
does not extend the weekend? The common understanding is that a
three-day weekend is the result.

<https://www.npr.org/2019/11/04/776163853/microsoft-japan-says-4-day-work
week-boosted-workers-productivity-by-40>

"Workers at Microsoft Japan enjoyed an enviable perk this summer:
working four days a week, enjoying a three-day weekend and getting
their normal, five-day paycheck. The result, the company says, was a
productivity boost of 40%."
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
The distinction is important as, for instance, in France
the equivalent of Labor Day ("Fête du travail") is a fixed date, i.e.
the 1st of May, and so may very well fall on a Saturday or Sunday - in which
case it's actually included in the weekend itself.
And is not relevant in the slightest. Fixed-day holidays -- Christmas
and New Year's Day, the Fourth of July, and Veterans Day -- either do
or do not yield an extended weekend; but if they fall on a Saturday or
Sunday, normally a compensatory day off is awarded (usually on Monday.
NB we don't do "Boxing Day.")
Quinn C
2019-12-02 01:35:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor Day.
(Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to stay for work somewhere else for a while.
She regretted that she hadn't been there at her office when she should have.
question: about "over Labor Day"
What I guess is it means: she came back to Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from there.
but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations.
Really? A long weekend usually is extended by a Friday or Monday,
whereas I would have thought that a "pont" is a Monday or Friday that
bridges the gap between the weekend and a day off on Tuesday or
Thursday.

That's what "Brückentag" means in German, and I'm pretty sure I heard
"bridge day" in English from someone who's not a German speaker, so if
that isn't idiomatic English, I would assume it was imported from
French.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Anders D. Nygaard
2019-12-02 18:16:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
I wasn't even in Massachusetts then, just one weekend over Labor Day.
(Port Mortuary by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's office is in Massachusetts, but she had to stay for work somewhere else for a while.
She regretted that she hadn't been there at her office when she should have.
question: about "over Labor Day"
What I guess is it means: she came back to Massachusetts just one weekend while she was working away from there.
but I couldn't be sure how "weekend" and "Labor Day" are related.
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations.
Really? A long weekend usually is extended by a Friday or Monday,
whereas I would have thought that a "pont" is a Monday or Friday that
bridges the gap between the weekend and a day off on Tuesday or
Thursday.
That's what "Brückentag" means in German, and I'm pretty sure I heard
"bridge day" in English from someone who's not a German speaker, so if
that isn't idiomatic English, I would assume it was imported from
French.
For comparison, the corresponding Danish term is "klemdag"
(lit. "Squeeze day) for the day which is squeezed in between a weekend
and a holiday, and is often taken as a vacation day to get a four-day
weekend. As Ascension is an official Danish holiday which always falls
on a Thursday, the day after Ascension is a prime example of such a day.

/Anders, Denmark.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-02 15:06:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations. But "weekend" means "Saturday and Sunday", whether
in English or French.
How many times do you have to be told to stop telling native speakers
how to speak their language?

"Long weekend" exists, but perhaps referring to when someone takes a day
off on a Friday or Monday, not when it's a regularly scheduled holiday.
Cheryl
2019-12-02 15:48:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations. But "weekend" means "Saturday and Sunday", whether
in English or French.
How many times do you have to be told to stop telling native speakers
how to speak their language?
"Long weekend" exists, but perhaps referring to when someone takes a day
off on a Friday or Monday, not when it's a regularly scheduled holiday.
I've enjoyed many a long weekend that included a regularly scheduled
holiday.
--
Cheryl
b***@aol.com
2019-12-02 15:49:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations. But "weekend" means "Saturday and Sunday", whether
in English or French.
How many times do you have to be told to stop telling native speakers
how to speak their language?
"Long weekend" exists, but perhaps referring to when someone takes a day
off on a Friday or Monday, not when it's a regularly scheduled holiday.
Yet it appears in Wiki's very definition of "Labor Day":

---
Labor Day in the United States of America is a public holiday celebrated
on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and
the power of collective action by laborers,[1] who are essential for the
workings of society. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor
Day Weekend. It is recognized as a federal holiday.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_Day
---
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-02 16:29:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations. But "weekend" means "Saturday and Sunday", whether
in English or French.
How many times do you have to be told to stop telling native speakers
how to speak their language?
"Long weekend" exists, but perhaps referring to when someone takes a day
off on a Friday or Monday, not when it's a regularly scheduled holiday.
---
Labor Day in the United States of America is a public holiday celebrated
on the first Monday in September. It honors the American labor movement and
the power of collective action by laborers,[1] who are essential for the
workings of society. It is the Monday of the long weekend known as Labor
Day Weekend. It is recognized as a federal holiday.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_Day
---
Do an n-gram for "long weekend" vs. "three-day weekend."
b***@shaw.ca
2019-12-02 19:29:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by tonbei
Labor Day must be a part of that weekend, or Labor Days was among that one weekend when she came back.
She stayed during the weekend, and that weekend included Labor Day.
Am I right?
Not exactly, as Labor Day comes on top of, but is not included in, the
weekend proper.
The many holidays that fall on a Monday give us a "three-day weekend."
That you can't say that in French has no bearing on the English expression.
Sometimes, Thursday or Tuesday holidays give us a "four-day weekend."
French has a specific word ("pont") to refer to weekends that are extended
with a holiday. However, English has "long weekend" as a dedicated term to
describe such situations. But "weekend" means "Saturday and Sunday", whether
in English or French.
How many times do you have to be told to stop telling native speakers
how to speak their language?
"Long weekend" exists, but perhaps referring to when someone takes a day
off on a Friday or Monday, not when it's a regularly scheduled holiday.
In my usage, and in my experience of Canadian English, a long weekend
is usually three days -- Saturday and Sunday, and a third day that's
usually a statutory holiday such as Labour Day, Christmas Day, New
Year's Day, etc. The "stats" usually fall on a Monday and sometimes
on a Friday.

A long weekend can be extended to four or more days by people
who have banked vacation days, time in lieu of overtime pay, etc.

bill
tonbei
2019-12-02 02:39:51 UTC
Permalink
I've drawn a sketch to decribe a concept of "over" in the quoted sentence.
Loading Image...

Is this description right to show the concept?
CDB
2019-12-02 11:27:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I've drawn a sketch to decribe a concept of "over" in the quoted
sentence. https://image02.seesaawiki.jp/a/4/a4674/jrbRIuFbJD.jpg
Is this description right to show the concept?
No. It follows this definition from among the many at Merriam-Webster:

: throughout, during
// over the past 25 years

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/over

"I was there over the weekend" means I was there during the whole weekend".

As I have said, I believe that in that line of dialogue "Labor Day"
stands for "the Labor Day Weekend".
tonbei
2019-12-02 13:47:05 UTC
Permalink
So she should have said," over Labor Day weekend," but
she started with "weekend", and followed with "over Labor Day", intending
to mean "over Labor Day weekend."
Am I right?

Loading Image...
Tony Cooper
2019-12-02 15:29:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
So she should have said," over Labor Day weekend," but
she started with "weekend", and followed with "over Labor Day", intending
to mean "over Labor Day weekend."
Am I right?
https://image02.seesaawiki.jp/a/4/a4674/B4rxNRmF8O.jpg
No. It's fiction. It's dialog. People really do speak this way, and
dialog in fiction should represent dialog in real life.

Do not confuse formal writing with dialog in fiction. If all
characters in a novel spoke formal and proper English, they would not
seem real to the reader.

Despite what was posted by someone else, we do use the term to
describe a weekend followed by a Monday holiday as a "long weekend".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-02 15:41:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Despite what was posted by someone else,
Why are you afraid to type my name? Do you fear retribution for the
violation of some (nonexistent) taboo?
CDB
2019-12-02 20:03:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
So she should have said," over Labor Day weekend," but
she started with "weekend", and followed with "over Labor Day", intending
to mean "over Labor Day weekend."
Am I right?
https://image02.seesaawiki.jp/a/4/a4674/B4rxNRmF8O.jpg
That is what I think.
Lewis
2019-12-03 12:39:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
So she should have said," over Labor Day weekend," but
she started with "weekend", and followed with "over Labor Day", intending
to mean "over Labor Day weekend."
What was quoted was in no way confusing.
--
I know you won't believe it's true I only went with her cuz she
looked like you
tonbei
2019-12-02 22:08:04 UTC
Permalink
I'm still confused.
Could I understand like the following?

1) over Labor Day weekend grammatically correct expression
2) over weekend Labor Day meaning a paricular "weekend" named as "Labor Day"
3) weekend over Labor Day acutally spoken this way as the same meaning as above

The bottom line is these three are almost of the same meaning.
Ken Blake
2019-12-02 22:16:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I'm still confused.
Could I understand like the following?
1) over Labor Day weekend grammatically correct expression
That's fine to me.
Post by tonbei
2) over weekend Labor Day meaning a paricular "weekend" named as "Labor Day"
No. That sounds weird. You could say "over the weekend of Labor Day."
Post by tonbei
3) weekend over Labor Day acutally spoken this way as the same meaning as above
Also weird.
Post by tonbei
The bottom line is these three are almost of the same meaning.
No.
--
Ken
Tony Cooper
2019-12-02 22:55:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I'm still confused.
Could I understand like the following?
1) over Labor Day weekend grammatically correct expression
2) over weekend Labor Day meaning a paricular "weekend" named as "Labor Day"
3) weekend over Labor Day acutally spoken this way as the same meaning as above
The bottom line is these three are almost of the same meaning.
No.

1) is quite understandable, but subject to nitpicks. The "weekend" is
Saturday and Sunday, but we do refer to a "three-day weekend" when a
holiday falls on a Friday or Monday.

2) and 3) are not acceptable or understandable.

You are including "over" in each example, and "over" - in this context
- means "the entire period". If I went to the beach over labor day
weekend, I was at the beach on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.

"Over" is not always used. "I went to the beach on the Sunday of
Labor Day weekend" means I was at the beach only on Sunday. "I went
to the beach during the Labor Day weekend" means I did go to the
beach, but I'm not telling you which day I was there.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lewis
2019-12-03 12:45:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
I'm still confused.
Could I understand like the following?
1) over Labor Day weekend grammatically correct expression
2) over weekend Labor Day meaning a paricular "weekend" named as "Labor Day"
3) weekend over Labor Day acutally spoken this way as the same meaning as above
The bottom line is these three are almost of the same meaning.
No.
1) is quite understandable, but subject to nitpicks. The "weekend" is
Saturday and Sunday, but we do refer to a "three-day weekend" when a
holiday falls on a Friday or Monday.
Heck, Thanksgiving weekend means the four days from Thursday to Sunday,
Sometimes it includes the Wednesday to Sunday.
Post by Tony Cooper
2) and 3) are not acceptable or understandable.
#3 can work as part of a longer statement.
Post by Tony Cooper
You are including "over" in each example, and "over" - in this context
- means "the entire period". If I went to the beach over labor day
weekend, I was at the beach on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.
"Over" is not always used. "I went to the beach on the Sunday of
Labor Day weekend" means I was at the beach only on Sunday. "I went
to the beach during the Labor Day weekend" means I did go to the
beach, but I'm not telling you which day I was there.
Heck, you can even say you went to the beech over Labor Day Weekend if
you travelled somewhere with w beach and only went to the actual beach
one day. Or, actually, none of the days.
--
"Are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"Uh, I think so, Brain, but I get all clammy inside the tent."
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-03 15:58:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by tonbei
I'm still confused.
Could I understand like the following?
1) over Labor Day weekend grammatically correct expression
2) over weekend Labor Day meaning a paricular "weekend" named as "Labor Day"
3) weekend over Labor Day acutally spoken this way as the same meaning as above
The bottom line is these three are almost of the same meaning.
No.
1) is quite understandable, but subject to nitpicks. The "weekend" is
Saturday and Sunday, but we do refer to a "three-day weekend" when a
holiday falls on a Friday or Monday.
2) and 3) are not acceptable or understandable.
You are including "over" in each example, and "over" - in this context
- means "the entire period". If I went to the beach over labor day
weekend, I was at the beach on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.
"Over" is not always used. "I went to the beach on the Sunday of
Labor Day weekend" means I was at the beach only on Sunday. "I went
That's an arthur-Navi sort of thing to say: "I went to the beach the
day before Labor Day" is normal.
Post by Tony Cooper
to the beach during the Labor Day weekend" means I did go to the
beach, but I'm not telling you which day I was there.
CDB
2019-12-03 12:11:15 UTC
Permalink
I'm still confused. Could I understand like the following?
1) over Labor Day weekend grammatically correct expression 2) over
weekend Labor Day meaning a paricular "weekend" named as "Labor
Day" 3) weekend over Labor Day acutally spoken this way as the
same meaning as above
The bottom line is these three are almost of the same meaning.
Only (1) has any meaning for me. You may be over-thinking the question.

"Weekend", "long weekend", and "the Labour Day weekend" designate
periods of time. In the example you brought up, it seems probable that
"Labor Day" stood for "the Labor Day weekend"; the special holiday is on
Monday, the third and last day of that long weekend.

One meaning of "over", used with a period of time, is "during all of".
"I was there over the Labor Day weekend" means "I was there during all
of the Labor Day weekend".
Lewis
2019-12-03 12:42:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I'm still confused.
Could I understand like the following?
1) over Labor Day weekend grammatically correct expression
Yes
Post by tonbei
2) over weekend Labor Day meaning a paricular "weekend" named as "Labor Day"
No one says "over weekend Labor Day"
Post by tonbei
3) weekend over Labor Day acutally spoken this way as the same meaning as above
Means much the same as #1 above.
Post by tonbei
The bottom line is these three are almost of the same meaning.
No. #2 is nonsense.
--
Im finding's you'r mis'use of apostrophe's disturbing.
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