Discussion:
looking to get a promotion
(too old to reply)
a***@gmail.com
2019-11-10 07:02:33 UTC
Permalink
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to getting a promotion.

Are the above sentences grammatical?
Are they correct?

Which of the above correspond to which of the below?

a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.

Gratefully,
Navi
Peter Young
2019-11-10 08:16:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to getting a promotion.
Are the above sentences grammatical?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are they correct?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
None, really.

If I understand what you're trying to say, which is improbable, what's
wrong with "He hopes for promotion"?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-10 14:13:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to getting a promotion.
Are the above sentences grammatical?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are they correct?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
None, really.
If I understand what you're trying to say, which is improbable, what's
wrong with "He hopes for promotion"?
Um, that doesn't say what the sentences say?
Lewis
2019-11-10 15:20:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to getting a promotion.
Are the above sentences grammatical?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are they correct?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
None, really.
I disagree, #3 definitely means b.
Post by Peter Young
If I understand what you're trying to say, which is improbable, what's
wrong with "He hopes for promotion"?
Hope is inspirational, looking is active.
--
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TOFU>
Lewis
2019-11-10 20:54:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Peter Young
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to getting a promotion.
Are the above sentences grammatical?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are they correct?
No
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
None, really.
I disagree, #3 definitely means b.
Post by Peter Young
If I understand what you're trying to say, which is improbable, what's
wrong with "He hopes for promotion"?
Hope is inspirational, looking is active.
Ugh. don't know how that happened. *aspirational*
--
'Are you Death?' IT'S THE SCYTHE, ISN'T IT? PEOPLE ALWAYS NOTICE THE
SCYTHE.
Eric Walker
2019-11-10 12:17:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
4) He is looking to getting a promotion. [number corrected]
Are the above sentences grammatical?
Are they correct?
That depends on what definitions of "look" one is willing to accept as
valid. If, just for discussion's sake, we take it to be synonymous with
"expect", then we'd have:

1a) He expects to be getting a promotion.
2a) He expects to get a promotion.
3a) He is expecting to get a promotion.
4a) He is expecting to getting a promotion.

Clearly 4a is grammatically erroneous. The rest are passable.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
Only (c) matches the sentences given; but that is necessarily so, since
we assumed that "look" was intended as colloquial for "expect". If we
instead assume it meant "seem", we'd have:

1b) He seems to be getting a promotion.
2b) He seems to get a promotion.
3b) He is seeming to get a promotion.
4b) He is seeming to getting a promotion.

Of those, all save (1) are gibberish.

And sense (b) doesn't fit any adaptation I can readily conceive.

So it seems that "look" must have been intended to stand in for "expect",
with the results noted above. And I will add that I definitely do not
believe that it can or should have that meaning. I realize that careless
folk too often say things like "He looks to be losing the contest," but
that doesn't make such constructions sound English.
--
Cordially,
Eric Walker
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-10 14:15:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Eric Walker
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
4) He is looking to getting a promotion. [number corrected]
Are the above sentences grammatical?
Are they correct?
That depends on what definitions of "look" one is willing to accept as
valid. If, just for discussion's sake, we take it to be synonymous with
That's called "begging the question," or "assuming what is to be proven."
Post by Eric Walker
1a) He expects to be getting a promotion.
2a) He expects to get a promotion.
3a) He is expecting to get a promotion.
4a) He is expecting to getting a promotion.
Clearly 4a is grammatically erroneous. The rest are passable.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
Only (c) matches the sentences given; but that is necessarily so, since
we assumed that "look" was intended as colloquial for "expect". If we
There is no "instead."
Post by Eric Walker
1b) He seems to be getting a promotion.
2b) He seems to get a promotion.
3b) He is seeming to get a promotion.
4b) He is seeming to getting a promotion.
Of those, all save (1) are gibberish.
And sense (b) doesn't fit any adaptation I can readily conceive.
So it seems that "look" must have been intended to stand in for "expect",
with the results noted above. And I will add that I definitely do not
believe that it can or should have that meaning. I realize that careless
folk too often say things like "He looks to be losing the contest," but
that doesn't make such constructions sound English.
Sadly, Eric Walker is unfamiliar with 21st-century English and his
responses should usually be disregarded.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-10 14:12:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to getting a promotion.
Are the above sentences grammatical?
(1) and (3) are, (2) and (3) aren't.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are they correct?
?

They're not synonymous, if that's what you mean.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
(1) is (a) and maybe (c), (3) is (b).
Peter Young
2019-11-10 15:38:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He looks to be getting a promotion.
2) He looks to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to get a promotion.
3) He is looking to getting a promotion.
Are the above sentences grammatical?
(1) and (3) are, (2) and (3) aren't.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are they correct?
?
They're not synonymous, if that's what you mean.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which of the above correspond to which of the below?
a) He seems to be getting a promotion.
b) He is trying to get a promotion.
c) He expects to get a promotion.
(1) is (a) and maybe (c), (3) is (b).
None of these sentences, apart from b) and c), are anything like
colloquial BrE. The fact that people seem to disagree about what they mean
confirms this to me, at any rate.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Loading...