Discussion:
Zoomorph
Add Reply
Quinn C
2018-09-05 21:49:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.

So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.

So animalomorphizing? That doesn't sound right. Anthropo- is Greek, so
zoomorphizing? M-W actually has that (but no other of the onelook
dictionaries does), but it defines it as depicting deities or
supernatural forces as animals. Theriomorphizing, pretty much the same.

Is there a better word for what I'm looking for? I'm surprised that
this was so difficult, given that we have animated movies, in which
sometimes, things come to life and move around, without showing signs
of strict anthropomorphization, like speaking.
--
The bee must not pass judgment on the hive. (Voxish proverb)
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.125
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-09-05 22:58:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
So animalomorphizing? That doesn't sound right. Anthropo- is Greek, so
zoomorphizing? M-W actually has that (but no other of the onelook
dictionaries does), but it defines it as depicting deities or
supernatural forces as animals. Theriomorphizing, pretty much the same.
The OED has:

zoomorph, n.

Etymology: < zoo- comb. form + -morph comb. form, after zoomorphic
adj.

A representation of an animal form in art; a zoomorphic design or
figure.

zoomorphic, adj.

1. That represents or imitates animal forms, esp. in decorative art
or symbolism.
1849...

2.
a. Esp. of a god or supernatural being: that has, or is conceived or
represented as having, the form of an animal.
1872...

b. That ascribes the form or nature of an animal to something, esp.
to a god or supernatural being. Cf. anthropomorphic adj. 1.
Post by Quinn C
Is there a better word for what I'm looking for? I'm surprised that
this was so difficult, given that we have animated movies, in which
sometimes, things come to life and move around, without showing signs
of strict anthropomorphization, like speaking.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2018-09-05 23:05:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.

By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Quinn C
2018-09-06 03:07:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.
By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
Welcome to the 21st century. You may not have noticed, but that
interpretation has widely been dropped a while ago. The distinction is
now more between sporty (high bar) and urban (low bar). Plus, a lot of
bicycles are now "non-binary" anyway.
--
'Ah yes, we got that keyboard from Small Gods when they threw out
their organ. Unfortunately for complex theological reasons they
would only give us the white keys, so we can only program in C'.
Colin Fine in sci.lang

Disclaimer: I, Quinn, don't believe this to describe a real event
Tony Cooper
2018-09-06 04:28:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 23:07:25 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.
By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
Welcome to the 21st century. You may not have noticed, but that
interpretation has widely been dropped a while ago. The distinction is
now more between sporty (high bar) and urban (low bar). Plus, a lot of
bicycles are now "non-binary" anyway.
I thought the non-binary ones are called "tricycles". I see them in
retirement communities.

It seems that Walmart didn't get the memo on dropping the distinction.
https://www.walmart.com/search/?query=Bicycles&adid=22222222220206823123&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=e&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=51254070236&wl4=kwd-667580975&wl5=9011760&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&veh=sem
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Quinn C
2018-09-06 04:44:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 23:07:25 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.
By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
Welcome to the 21st century. You may not have noticed, but that
interpretation has widely been dropped a while ago. The distinction is
now more between sporty (high bar) and urban (low bar). Plus, a lot of
bicycles are now "non-binary" anyway.
I thought the non-binary ones are called "tricycles". I see them in
retirement communities.
It seems that Walmart didn't get the memo on dropping the distinction.
Of course they would be years behind. No surprise there.

This large maker has the categories On-road, X-road, Off-road, E-bike,
Youth and Women. But many of the bikes in the Women category have the
same "ambiguous" frames as the "ungendered" ones. The difference is
elsewhere (size? saddle? ...)

<https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes/startpage>
--
"Bother", said the Borg, as they assimilated Pooh.
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-09-06 04:48:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 23:07:25 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.
By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
Welcome to the 21st century. You may not have noticed, but that
interpretation has widely been dropped a while ago. The distinction is
now more between sporty (high bar) and urban (low bar). Plus, a lot of
bicycles are now "non-binary" anyway.
I thought the non-binary ones are called "tricycles". I see them in
retirement communities.
It seems that Walmart didn't get the memo on dropping the distinction.
Of course they would be years behind. No surprise there.
This large maker has the categories On-road, X-road, Off-road, E-bike,
Youth and Women. But many of the bikes in the Women category have the
same "ambiguous" frames as the "ungendered" ones. The difference is
elsewhere (size? saddle? ...)
<https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes/startpage>
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-09-06 05:01:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[Disregard my accidental previous post, screwed up.]
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
It seems that Walmart didn't get the memo
on dropping the distinction.
Of course they would be years behind.
Of course the whole world is years behind fanatical Quim.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Tony Cooper
2018-09-06 05:10:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Sep 2018 00:44:08 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 23:07:25 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.
By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
Welcome to the 21st century. You may not have noticed, but that
interpretation has widely been dropped a while ago. The distinction is
now more between sporty (high bar) and urban (low bar). Plus, a lot of
bicycles are now "non-binary" anyway.
I thought the non-binary ones are called "tricycles". I see them in
retirement communities.
It seems that Walmart didn't get the memo on dropping the distinction.
Of course they would be years behind. No surprise there.
Years behind? Walmart is selling bikes to school-age kids and some
adults who want a bicycle for some leisurely rides. What they are
offering is smack-dab in the present for their market. They are
selling bikes to parents who know the kid they're buying for will grow
out of that bike in a year or so, lose it, or have it stolen. Parents
who are looking for a bike at price they can afford.

What you consider the present to be is evidently the adult rider who
willing to spend hundreds of dollars or thousands of dollars on a road
machine, or off-road machine, and that's an entirely different market.

It's sheer snobbery to say that Walmart is "years behind".
Post by Quinn C
This large maker has the categories On-road, X-road, Off-road, E-bike,
Youth and Women. But many of the bikes in the Women category have the
same "ambiguous" frames as the "ungendered" ones. The difference is
elsewhere (size? saddle? ...)
<https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes/startpage>
Right. The "present" is a $9,180 Defy Advanced SL bicycle. And it
doesn't even come with Lycra pants, a helmet with a tiny mirror, or
water bottle holder.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Quinn C
2018-09-06 16:31:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 6 Sep 2018 00:44:08 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 23:07:25 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.
By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
Welcome to the 21st century. You may not have noticed, but that
interpretation has widely been dropped a while ago. The distinction is
now more between sporty (high bar) and urban (low bar). Plus, a lot of
bicycles are now "non-binary" anyway.
I thought the non-binary ones are called "tricycles". I see them in
retirement communities.
It seems that Walmart didn't get the memo on dropping the distinction.
Of course they would be years behind. No surprise there.
Years behind? Walmart is selling bikes to school-age kids and some
adults who want a bicycle for some leisurely rides. What they are
offering is smack-dab in the present for their market. They are
selling bikes to parents who know the kid they're buying for will grow
out of that bike in a year or so, lose it, or have it stolen. Parents
who are looking for a bike at price they can afford.
What you consider the present to be is evidently the adult rider
Yes in my world, bicycles are not a children's thing. I don't see many
children using bicycles, because it mostly wouldn't be safe for them to
ride where I go.
Post by Tony Cooper
who
willing to spend hundreds of dollars or thousands of dollars on a road
machine, or off-road machine, and that's an entirely different market.
It's sheer snobbery to say that Walmart is "years behind".
If you want a bicycle you can actually use, you better spend "hundreds
of dollars". How cheap do you want it?

Most people are quite willing to spend thousands of dollars extra on
cars that are bigger, faster, or simply more ostentatious than they
need. Is it snobbery to you to mention the existence of BMW and Lexus?

And it's not just about price. Walmart caters to a lot of people who
learned about the world in their youth, but didn't change their outlook
much since they became adults in the 1960s, 70s or 80s. They don't
cater as much to people who ask questions about rampant consumerism,
ecological impact or exploitative labor practices.

Less aggressively stated, the clientele who wants a leisurely ride now
and then is fine with the bicycles of yesteryear, and doesn't need to
keep up with the technological developments. They have no need of being
up to date. That doesn't change what "up to date" means. I haven't used
a car with a starter button, an onboard computer or ABS, but I
recognize that these are now standard features, and my car experience
is stuck in the 1980s, when I learned driving. Not missing the choke,
though.

I'm in neither of the two groups of bicycle riders you recognize. I'm
using the bike to get from point A to point B in the city. My
observations are mostly about my group of riders, with whom I'm mostly
sharing the road or the bicycle path. The leisurely riders only come
out in the weekend, and the (real or aspirational) racing crowd stays
out of the city core.
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Quinn C
This large maker has the categories On-road, X-road, Off-road, E-bike,
Youth and Women. But many of the bikes in the Women category have the
same "ambiguous" frames as the "ungendered" ones. The difference is
elsewhere (size? saddle? ...)
<https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/bikes/startpage>
Right. The "present" is a $9,180 Defy Advanced SL bicycle. And it
doesn't even come with Lycra pants, a helmet with a tiny mirror, or
water bottle holder.
I believe Giant was at some point the biggest bicycle maker in the
world. They cater to all markets.

As you are into gendered bikes, here's one of their "women's" offers,
starting at $380:

<https://www.liv-cycling.com/us/bikes-alight>

Not sure you would recognize it as a "girl's" bike.

$380 is less than half of what the average bicycle sold in Germany
costs. That's because many Germans treat bicycles as serious vehicles,
not toys.

I'd expect stores to sell it for less than the maker's recommendation.
I wouldn't expect anything solid at that price. Not for using every
day; OK for occasional use, probably.

When someone complained to me that $500 (Canadian) was expensive for a
bicycle, I pointed out that this is the price of one fairly ordinary
car *repair*.
--
Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach him to use
the 'Net and he won't bother you for weeks.
Tony Cooper
2018-09-06 19:46:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Sep 2018 12:31:14 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 6 Sep 2018 00:44:08 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tony Cooper
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 23:07:25 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 5 Sep 2018 17:49:03 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Nah. You are just reassuring the bicycle that it need not decide if
it's a boy's bike or a girl's bike and it's OK to be confused.
By patting the seat, you are ostentatiously avoiding that area where
the bar is that determines if it is a boy's model or a girl's model to
communicate to the bike that how it was made does not determine how it
should consider it itself.
Welcome to the 21st century. You may not have noticed, but that
interpretation has widely been dropped a while ago. The distinction is
now more between sporty (high bar) and urban (low bar). Plus, a lot of
bicycles are now "non-binary" anyway.
I thought the non-binary ones are called "tricycles". I see them in
retirement communities.
It seems that Walmart didn't get the memo on dropping the distinction.
Of course they would be years behind. No surprise there.
Years behind? Walmart is selling bikes to school-age kids and some
adults who want a bicycle for some leisurely rides. What they are
offering is smack-dab in the present for their market. They are
selling bikes to parents who know the kid they're buying for will grow
out of that bike in a year or so, lose it, or have it stolen. Parents
who are looking for a bike at price they can afford.
What you consider the present to be is evidently the adult rider
Yes in my world, bicycles are not a children's thing. I don't see many
children using bicycles, because it mostly wouldn't be safe for them to
ride where I go.
If that's the case, then how can you say that Walmart is "years
behind"? Your world is evidently not the world of suburbia.

At the elementary school near me, the bicycle pen (a caged area locked
during school hours) is full of bikes. Most having cost less than
$100. Perfectly suitable for a grade-schooler.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RHDraney
2018-09-06 02:40:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
Rich Ulrich
2018-09-06 05:46:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RHDraney
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
I wonder if it is -
Affirming that something is done/over, to seal the memory.

I remember reading of an actor teaching a director about
the reality of hanging up a pay-phone at the end of the call
(back in the day). Almost every person would take the phone
away from their ear, /look/ at the mouthpiece, then hang
up the phone. That was a sequence the director had not put
in the script until the actor ad-libbed it. And explained it.

The phone-thing seems similar to the bike-thing to me, and
"anthropomorphizing" doesn't fit the phone-thing.
--
Rich Ulrich
Tak To
2018-09-06 16:07:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by RHDraney
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
I wonder if it is -
Affirming that something is done/over, to seal the memory.
I remember reading of an actor teaching a director about
the reality of hanging up a pay-phone at the end of the call
(back in the day). Almost every person would take the phone
away from their ear, /look/ at the mouthpiece, then hang
up the phone. That was a sequence the director had not put
in the script until the actor ad-libbed it. And explained it.
Really? The actor thought that "almost every person" in
real life stared at the mouthpiece before hanging up?
And was that only for pay-phones or applicable to other
phones as well?

I have never done that myself, and have never noticed
people doing it in real life. (I am talking about phones
in general, since I have had very few occasions to
observe how others behave inside a phone booth.)

I think the actor was confusing movie stories with reality.
Post by Rich Ulrich
The phone-thing seems similar to the bike-thing to me, and
"anthropomorphizing" doesn't fit the phone-thing.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-06 16:24:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by RHDraney
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
I wonder if it is -
Affirming that something is done/over, to seal the memory.
I remember reading of an actor teaching a director about
the reality of hanging up a pay-phone at the end of the call
(back in the day). Almost every person would take the phone
away from their ear, /look/ at the mouthpiece, then hang
up the phone. That was a sequence the director had not put
in the script until the actor ad-libbed it. And explained it.
Really? The actor thought that "almost every person" in
real life stared at the mouthpiece before hanging up?
And was that only for pay-phones or applicable to other
phones as well?
How do you get "stared at" from "looked at"?
Post by Tak To
I have never done that myself, and have never noticed
people doing it in real life. (I am talking about phones
in general, since I have had very few occasions to
observe how others behave inside a phone booth.)
Seems like a pretty normal, standard practice.
Post by Tak To
I think the actor was confusing movie stories with reality.
Hunh? Some movie somewhere -- or several -- have made a point of pointing
out that it's pretty standard for people to look at the handset before
hanging it up? It doesn't seem natural that when you're about to perform
some routine act, you verify that all the components of that act are in
good order, and you do that subconsciously? Which is why an actor has to
have it pointed out when he's doing the unnatural act of pretending to
hang up a phone after pretending to have had a phone conversation?

Both Luise Rainer and Liza Minnelli got their first Oscar nominations for
their acting in telephone scenes (The Great Ziegfeld and The Sterile
Cuckoo, respectively). (Rainer won; Minnelli was up against Jane Fonda,
and the winner, Maggie Smith.)
Post by Tak To
Post by Rich Ulrich
The phone-thing seems similar to the bike-thing to me, and
"anthropomorphizing" doesn't fit the phone-thing.
Tony Cooper
2018-09-06 19:30:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by RHDraney
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
I wonder if it is -
Affirming that something is done/over, to seal the memory.
I remember reading of an actor teaching a director about
the reality of hanging up a pay-phone at the end of the call
(back in the day). Almost every person would take the phone
away from their ear, /look/ at the mouthpiece, then hang
up the phone. That was a sequence the director had not put
in the script until the actor ad-libbed it. And explained it.
Really? The actor thought that "almost every person" in
real life stared at the mouthpiece before hanging up?
And was that only for pay-phones or applicable to other
phones as well?
I have never done that myself, and have never noticed
people doing it in real life. (I am talking about phones
in general, since I have had very few occasions to
observe how others behave inside a phone booth.)
I can believe it. I've never noticed that I've done it, or noticed
others doing it, but there are a lot instinctual moves that people do
that we don't pay any attention to. The actor did.

That's why gamblers look for "tells" in other card players, and
football players look for "tells" on the opposing players. A "tell"
is something that is done that the person isn't aware they're doing.
Most people don't pick them up in others.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
John Varela
2018-09-06 20:05:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by RHDraney
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
I wonder if it is -
Affirming that something is done/over, to seal the memory.
I remember reading of an actor teaching a director about
the reality of hanging up a pay-phone at the end of the call
(back in the day). Almost every person would take the phone
away from their ear, /look/ at the mouthpiece, then hang
up the phone. That was a sequence the director had not put
in the script until the actor ad-libbed it. And explained it.
Really? The actor thought that "almost every person" in
real life stared at the mouthpiece before hanging up?
And was that only for pay-phones or applicable to other
phones as well?
I have never done that myself, and have never noticed
people doing it in real life. (I am talking about phones
in general, since I have had very few occasions to
observe how others behave inside a phone booth.)
I think the actor was confusing movie stories with reality.
It's been decades since I've seen a pay phone much less used one,
but I can think of a reason why the user would look at the handset
(not necessarily the "mouthpiece") before hanging up. It's an
unfamiliar handset. The user has to hang it up. The hook, cradle
or whatever, is also unfamiliar. So the user looks at the handset,
looks at the wall unit, sees how the parts go together, and hangs
up.

Search Google Images for "pay phone" to see the variety of
configurations that existed.
Post by Tak To
Post by Rich Ulrich
The phone-thing seems similar to the bike-thing to me, and
"anthropomorphizing" doesn't fit the phone-thing.
--
John Varela
Quinn C
2018-09-06 16:31:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by RHDraney
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
I wonder if it is -
Affirming that something is done/over, to seal the memory.
I remember reading of an actor teaching a director about
the reality of hanging up a pay-phone at the end of the call
(back in the day). Almost every person would take the phone
away from their ear, /look/ at the mouthpiece, then hang
up the phone. That was a sequence the director had not put
in the script until the actor ad-libbed it. And explained it.
The phone-thing seems similar to the bike-thing to me, and
"anthropomorphizing" doesn't fit the phone-thing.
I agree. The function of the pat is probably the ritual confirmation
that I'm all done - the bike is in a good place, safely locked, I
haven't left a bag on it, and whatever else seems important.

But that's a slightly different question from my original, which was
more about why it's a pat, and why on the saddle.
--
The most likely way for the world to be destroyed, most experts
agree, is by accident. That's where we come in; we're computer
professionals. We cause accidents.
Nathaniel Borenstein

Disclaimer: I, Quinn, don't believe computer professionals cause
accidents at a far higher rate than other professionals
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-09-06 21:08:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 6 Sep 2018 12:31:13 -0400, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Rich Ulrich
Post by RHDraney
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual? Is it
anthropomorphizing? I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
I wonder if it's something I've seen parrots do, when they're
demonstrating their skills at human language beyond mere mimicry...after
telling the handler the object is "green" or "wood" or whatever, the
bird always insists on picking it up or at least touching it with its
beak before continuing, as if to assure itself that the object is
real...(I've discussed this behavior with a bird-fancier and concluded
that it's connected with the bird's lack of 3D binocular vision, which
makes even flat photographs appear "real" until they confirm otherwise)....r
I wonder if it is -
Affirming that something is done/over, to seal the memory.
I remember reading of an actor teaching a director about
the reality of hanging up a pay-phone at the end of the call
(back in the day). Almost every person would take the phone
away from their ear, /look/ at the mouthpiece, then hang
up the phone. That was a sequence the director had not put
in the script until the actor ad-libbed it. And explained it.
The phone-thing seems similar to the bike-thing to me, and
"anthropomorphizing" doesn't fit the phone-thing.
I agree. The function of the pat is probably the ritual confirmation
that I'm all done - the bike is in a good place, safely locked, I
haven't left a bag on it, and whatever else seems important.
But that's a slightly different question from my original, which was
more about why it's a pat, and why on the saddle.
In reverse order -
The saddle is the most pattable part of the bike.

Patting it as a "goodbye" gesture is similar to giving a handshake or,
occasionally, touching a person on the upper-arm/shoulder when leaving
them.
It is simliar to stroking a pet (cat or dog) when lwaving it.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
b***@aol.com
2018-09-06 13:10:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
I recently became aware that when I park my bicycle, before I step away
from it, I often give it a pat on the saddle.
So I stopped to wonder what that is. Is ist sexual?
Go figure.
Post by Quinn C
Is it anthropomorphizing?
No, as the bicycle would have sued you for harassment.
Post by Quinn C
I decided, no, it's closest to treating the bicycle
as if it was a horse or similar animal to ride on.
So animalomorphizing? That doesn't sound right. Anthropo- is Greek, so
zoomorphizing? M-W actually has that (but no other of the onelook
dictionaries does), but it defines it as depicting deities or
supernatural forces as animals. Theriomorphizing, pretty much the same.
Is there a better word for what I'm looking for? I'm surprised that
this was so difficult, given that we have animated movies, in which
sometimes, things come to life and move around, without showing signs
of strict anthropomorphization, like speaking.
--
The bee must not pass judgment on the hive. (Voxish proverb)
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.125
Loading...