Discussion:
And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?
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Mack A. Damia
2019-12-31 16:28:06 UTC
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"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"

The Pennsylvania Dutch, as well as many other cultures, believe eating
pork on New Year's Day brings good luck because pigs root around with
their snouts in a forward motion.

https://www.pressreader.com/usa/the-morning-call/20191231/281629602190076
Steve
2019-12-31 18:21:02 UTC
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On Tue, 31 Dec 2019 08:28:06 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
We don't, it's only you that does, weirdo.
HNY.
Sn!pe
2019-12-31 18:30:01 UTC
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Post by Steve
On Tue, 31 Dec 2019 08:28:06 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
We don't, it's only you that does, weirdo.
HNY.
lol
--
^Ï^ My pet rock Gordon just is.
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-31 18:56:25 UTC
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Post by Steve
On Tue, 31 Dec 2019 08:28:06 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
We don't, it's only you that does, weirdo.
HNY.
lol
Scat-boi Sn!pe, is that you?

Your momma give good head.
Ken Blake
2019-12-31 18:26:11 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
The Pennsylvania Dutch, as well as many other cultures, believe eating
pork on New Year's Day brings good luck because pigs root around with
their snouts in a forward motion.
https://www.pressreader.com/usa/the-morning-call/20191231/281629602190076
Entirely by coincidence, we're having pork chops, but not sauerkraut,
for dinner tomorrow.
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-01 16:53:11 UTC
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Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.

It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.

Do you read at brekkie or mot?
Ken Blake
2020-01-01 17:20:02 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
We never have brekkie in the US. <G>

My wife usually reads at breakfast. I sometimes read a book, sometimes
do a crossword puzzle, sometimes look at the supermarket ads.

I never read a newspaper any more. I get all my news on the internet
these days
--
Ken
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-01 18:02:44 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
Can't believe I missed this typo. I was sober, too.
Post by Ken Blake
We never have brekkie in the US. <G>
My wife usually reads at breakfast. I sometimes read a book, sometimes
do a crossword puzzle, sometimes look at the supermarket ads.
I never read a newspaper any more. I get all my news on the internet
these days.
I used to enjoy going to a nearby diner, buying the newspaper from one
of those contraptions and reading it while I was eating. Every
morning for years; back in the 1970s/1980s.
John Varela
2020-01-01 20:12:49 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
We never have brekkie in the US. <G>
My wife usually reads at breakfast. I sometimes read a book, sometimes
do a crossword puzzle, sometimes look at the supermarket ads.
I never read a newspaper any more. I get all my news on the internet
these days
Does that mean that you never get any local news?
--
John Varela
Ken Blake
2020-01-01 20:19:51 UTC
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Post by John Varela
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
We never have brekkie in the US. <G>
My wife usually reads at breakfast. I sometimes read a book, sometimes
do a crossword puzzle, sometimes look at the supermarket ads.
I never read a newspaper any more. I get all my news on the internet
these days
Does that mean that you never get any local news?
No, it doesn't. I get local news on the internet as well as national and
international.
--
Ken
Peter Moylan
2020-01-02 00:25:49 UTC
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When we moved into this condo the internet was not yet connected. I
had to go out and purchase the newspaper. $2.50 for a weekday
edition!
Mine costs $1.80 ($2.40 on Saturdays). An online subscription would cost
less, but I dislike doing crosswords and Sudoku online. Also, the walk
to buy the paper (1 km each way) is good exercise.

My wife and I rarely have breakfast together, because of different
morning priorities. (I'm retired, she's still working.) So I take my
light breakfast - a crumpet and a coffee - to an armchair and read my
paper in comfort.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@shaw.ca
2020-01-02 06:18:48 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
When we moved into this condo the internet was not yet connected. I
had to go out and purchase the newspaper. $2.50 for a weekday
edition!
Mine costs $1.80 ($2.40 on Saturdays). An online subscription would cost
less, but I dislike doing crosswords and Sudoku online. Also, the walk
to buy the paper (1 km each way) is good exercise.
My wife and I rarely have breakfast together, because of different
morning priorities. (I'm retired, she's still working.) So I take my
light breakfast - a crumpet and a coffee - to an armchair and read my
paper in comfort.
I have my own morning rituals that involve at least one real,
ink-on-newsprint newspaper and eventually a cup of coffee
with a bridge column.

I worked for newspapers and news services for 40-plus years,
and I feel that a day that doesn't begin with a newspaper
is not off to a good start.

Also, the local dailies continue to provide more local news stories
than anyone else in the news business, and at least a few stories
a day that no one else can match.

bill
Tak To
2020-01-02 19:53:57 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
In the Hong Kong (or Canton) of my teens, it was quite
common for a couple of close friends to go to Dim Sum
together each bringing along his/her own newspaper and
doing his/her own reading. However, one was expected to
share some of what one has read at some time. OTOH, face
to face conversation was not a requirement.

E.g.,

A: (without looking up) Gee, the price of X has gone up again!

B: (without looking up) Yeah... It is a bit surprising that
Team Y has won.

This worked only in very small groups of close friends.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
David Kleinecke
2020-01-02 21:10:33 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
In the Hong Kong (or Canton) of my teens, it was quite
common for a couple of close friends to go to Dim Sum
together each bringing along his/her own newspaper and
doing his/her own reading. However, one was expected to
share some of what one has read at some time. OTOH, face
to face conversation was not a requirement.
E.g.,
A: (without looking up) Gee, the price of X has gone up again!
B: (without looking up) Yeah... It is a bit surprising that
Team Y has won.
This worked only in very small groups of close friends.
I asked my wife why we were not eating pork and sauerkraut on
News Year's Day (we were having friends over for a Chinese
brunch). She said she never heard of such a thing and since I
hadn't either we agreed to deplore it. Then we got into a big
argument over whether the Jewish cooking tradition in the US
is more German or more Slavic. To be frank neither of us knows
beans about the Jewish cooking tradition.

PS: "OK, Boomer" doesn't apply to either of us.
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-02 21:19:57 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Tak To
Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
In the Hong Kong (or Canton) of my teens, it was quite
common for a couple of close friends to go to Dim Sum
together each bringing along his/her own newspaper and
doing his/her own reading. However, one was expected to
share some of what one has read at some time. OTOH, face
to face conversation was not a requirement.
E.g.,
A: (without looking up) Gee, the price of X has gone up again!
B: (without looking up) Yeah... It is a bit surprising that
Team Y has won.
This worked only in very small groups of close friends.
I asked my wife why we were not eating pork and sauerkraut on
News Year's Day (we were having friends over for a Chinese
brunch). She said she never heard of such a thing and since I
hadn't either we agreed to deplore it. Then we got into a big
argument over whether the Jewish cooking tradition in the US
is more German or more Slavic. To be frank neither of us knows
beans about the Jewish cooking tradition.
PS: "OK, Boomer" doesn't apply to either of us.
The Jewish population of Western Europe was tiny compared to that of
the Slavic areas. The costume of the extreme Hasidim, however, is that
of 18th-century German lands.
Tony Cooper
2020-01-02 22:23:49 UTC
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On Thu, 2 Jan 2020 13:10:33 -0800 (PST), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Tak To
Post by Mack A. Damia
Even though the traditional English breakfast is served at family and
social gatherings, it is culturally acceptable to ignore the other
occupants of your table whilst you eat your English breakfast and read
your newspaper, please do not be offended if the person you are eating
your English breakfast with ignores you, other than to comment on what
he or she is reading, this is part of the tradition.
It was traditionally during the eating of the English breakfast that
the British would acquaint themselves with the current affairs of the
day, an important part of the tradition.
Do you read at brekkie or mot?
In the Hong Kong (or Canton) of my teens, it was quite
common for a couple of close friends to go to Dim Sum
together each bringing along his/her own newspaper and
doing his/her own reading. However, one was expected to
share some of what one has read at some time. OTOH, face
to face conversation was not a requirement.
E.g.,
A: (without looking up) Gee, the price of X has gone up again!
B: (without looking up) Yeah... It is a bit surprising that
Team Y has won.
This worked only in very small groups of close friends.
I asked my wife why we were not eating pork and sauerkraut on
News Year's Day (we were having friends over for a Chinese
brunch). She said she never heard of such a thing and since I
hadn't either we agreed to deplore it. Then we got into a big
argument over whether the Jewish cooking tradition in the US
is more German or more Slavic. To be frank neither of us knows
beans about the Jewish cooking tradition.
PS: "OK, Boomer" doesn't apply to either of us.
It is a family tradition (down from my wife's family) to have herring
on New Year's Day. I'm really not interested in why this is a New
Year's Day thing because I like herring at any time.

On the "herrings in cream" or "pickled herring" choice, either is fine
with me.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-01 17:32:30 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
The Pennsylvania Dutch, as well as many other cultures, believe eating
pork on New Year's Day brings good luck because pigs root around with
their snouts in a forward motion.
https://www.pressreader.com/usa/the-morning-call/20191231/281629602190076
Shows once again that 'The Pennsylvania Dutch' aren't Dutch,
The issue is a linguistic one. Originally "Pennsylvania Deutsch" -
pronounced "doitch". (Pennsylvania Germans)

Easy to see how it became "Dutch".
Quinn C
2020-01-02 22:54:31 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
The Pennsylvania Dutch, as well as many other cultures, believe eating
pork on New Year's Day brings good luck because pigs root around with
their snouts in a forward motion.
https://www.pressreader.com/usa/the-morning-call/20191231/281629602190076
Shows once again that 'The Pennsylvania Dutch' aren't Dutch,
The issue is a linguistic one. Originally "Pennsylvania Deutsch" -
pronounced "doitch". (Pennsylvania Germans)
Easy to see how it became "Dutch".
Plus, it's etymologically the same word. The narrowing of "Dutch" to
mean only the people of the Netherlands is relatively recent.

Coming next week: Teuton.
--
(\_/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination.
Mack A. Damia
2020-01-02 23:38:02 UTC
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On Thu, 2 Jan 2020 17:54:31 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
The Pennsylvania Dutch, as well as many other cultures, believe eating
pork on New Year's Day brings good luck because pigs root around with
their snouts in a forward motion.
https://www.pressreader.com/usa/the-morning-call/20191231/281629602190076
Shows once again that 'The Pennsylvania Dutch' aren't Dutch,
The issue is a linguistic one. Originally "Pennsylvania Deutsch" -
pronounced "doitch". (Pennsylvania Germans)
Easy to see how it became "Dutch".
Plus, it's etymologically the same word. The narrowing of "Dutch" to
mean only the people of the Netherlands is relatively recent.
Coming next week: Teuton.
That's heavy, man!
b***@shaw.ca
2020-01-03 01:19:25 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
"And why do we eat pork and sauerkraut on New Year's Day?"
The Pennsylvania Dutch, as well as many other cultures, believe eating
pork on New Year's Day brings good luck because pigs root around with
their snouts in a forward motion.
https://www.pressreader.com/usa/the-morning-call/20191231/281629602190076
Shows once again that 'The Pennsylvania Dutch' aren't Dutch,
The issue is a linguistic one. Originally "Pennsylvania Deutsch" -
pronounced "doitch". (Pennsylvania Germans)
Easy to see how it became "Dutch".
Plus, it's etymologically the same word. The narrowing of "Dutch" to
mean only the people of the Netherlands is relatively recent.
About half a million Dutch emigrated from 1945 to 1970, most of them
to English-speaking countries. I don't know how many times I heard
relatives complain about being called "Dutch", which comes nowhere
close to sounding like "Nederlands", but did sound a lot like
"Deutsch", the nationality that had brutalized their country during
WWII.

bill

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