Discussion:
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
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Mack A. Damia
2021-05-03 12:23:20 UTC
Permalink
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever

John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8

McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.

Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction

https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
S K
2021-05-03 12:47:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
John McWhorter exudes smarm from every pore of his being.
s***@my-deja.com
2021-05-03 14:00:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
John McWhorter exudes smarm from every pore of his being.
...and then there are these:-
https://www.iceland.co.uk/p/mr-brains-6-pork-faggots-656g/38475.html
Mack A. Damia
2021-05-03 15:27:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
John McWhorter exudes smarm from every pore of his being.
Blacks who are successful tend to look down on their unsuccessful
brothers and sisters.

In a 2001 article, McWhorter wrote that black attitudes, rather than
white racism, were what held black people back. According to
McWhorter, "victimology, separatism, and anti-intellectualism underlie
the general black community’s response to all race-related issues".
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-03 15:42:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
I saw it in B&N this morning. It's a very small book.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
John McWhorter exudes smarm from every pore of his being.
Blacks who are successful tend to look down on their unsuccessful
brothers and sisters.
In a 2001 article, McWhorter wrote that black attitudes, rather than
white racism, were what held black people back. According to
McWhorter, "victimology, separatism, and anti-intellectualism underlie
the general black community’s response to all race-related issues".
And that's why the Manhattan Institute drug him east when Berkeley
didn't give him tenure. Here he became a rightwing media darling, and
Columbia will do anything to add rightwing media darlings to its roster
(e.g. Barzun, Triling). He has somehow wormed his way far up the
academic hierarchy as a linguist in a university that no longer has a
linguistics department.
Mack A. Damia
2021-05-03 16:33:43 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 3 May 2021 08:42:00 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
I saw it in B&N this morning. It's a very small book.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
John McWhorter exudes smarm from every pore of his being.
Blacks who are successful tend to look down on their unsuccessful
brothers and sisters.
In a 2001 article, McWhorter wrote that black attitudes, rather than
white racism, were what held black people back. According to
McWhorter, "victimology, separatism, and anti-intellectualism underlie
the general black community’s response to all race-related issues".
And that's why the Manhattan Institute drug him east when Berkeley
didn't give him tenure. Here he became a rightwing media darling, and
Columbia will do anything to add rightwing media darlings to its roster
(e.g. Barzun, Triling). He has somehow wormed his way far up the
academic hierarchy as a linguist in a university that no longer has a
linguistics department.
Ph.D in linguistics from Stanford? Something you missed, Daniels.

I particularly like his statement, “the linguist does not judge”. Keep
saying that to yourself as you post.
bruce bowser
2021-05-04 13:51:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
John McWhorter exudes smarm from every pore of his being.
Blacks who are successful tend to look down on their unsuccessful
brothers and sisters.
... on everyone less successful? ...or just 'their' brothers and sisters?
S K
2021-05-03 16:23:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by S K
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
John McWhorter exudes smarm from every pore of his being.
Tomette Candace Owens is beyond the pale (is there a pun here?)

Thomas Sowell who seems to have been around for 900 years old never says anything, although words do issue out of his mouth.

McWhorter is like an allowed field-slave child in Massa's home.

It is not clear what "black conservatives" want or stand for. But given their rarity, they are useful idiots for the right wing which is willing to throw them crumbs.

One model of wingers is "the frat boy" - rather like how Mercutio makes fun of Juliet's nurse in "Romeo and Juliet".
They attack "librulz" as if they were hazing freshmen in college.

There are now black male sidekicks for fratboy wingers.
bruce bowser
2021-05-03 13:00:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Nine Nasty Words: English in the Gutter: Then, Now, and Forever
John McWhorter. Avery, $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-593-18879-8
McWhorter (Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue), a professor of linguistics
and American studies at Columbia University, excavates the origins of
“the bedrock swears of modern English” in this playful account.
“Vested with the power of transgression,” curse words originate on the
opposite side of the brain from ordinary words, McWhorter explains, in
the areas associated with emotion. He touches on differences between
men’s and women’s speech before surveying classic profanities
including “fuck” (“the sheer frequency with which one can say it is
dazzling”), “shit” (“quite the journey for a word that means poop”),
and “motherfucker” (it “likely just happened to catch on among black
people in the same way that hackysack caught on among white ones”). In
a class by themselves are “the N-word” and the inflammatory “faggot,”
which referred to women before its association with gay men. McWhorter
acknowledges the discomfort these words might evoke, but maintains a
light touch throughout (“the linguist does not judge”). He tracks the
evolution of each word’s usage through a hodgepodge of cultural
examples, including Gilbert and Sullivan librettos, Stephen Sondheim
scores, the film The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, and quotes by
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. This colorful, trivia-filled etymology
will appeal to word snobs with a wild streak.
Reviewed on : 12/02/2020
Release date: 05/04/2021
Genre: Nonfiction
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-593-18879-8
Are you this McWhorter?
bozo de niro
2021-05-03 18:23:32 UTC
Permalink
Cuz I think F I D U C I A R Y sounds FILTHY.
bozo de niro
2021-05-03 18:26:47 UTC
Permalink
How about words that just SOUND dirty? is there any call for that?

Cuz I think F I D U C I A R Y sounds FILTHY.
bozo de niro
2021-05-03 19:03:30 UTC
Permalink
How about words that just SOUND dirty? is there any call for that?
Cuz I think F I D U C I A R Y sounds FILTHY.
I also think OFF-TOPICALLY that this teratogenically designed Google Groups monster and its incompetent, progressive editing properties is so fucked-up that I cannot say enough bad things about it — which reminds me, when can I use the compound word "CANNOT" versus when can I just use the word "CAN" followed by "NOT"?

Thank you.
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