Discussion:
The theory of Chris Lonsdale: Learn Any Language in 6 Months.
Add Reply
hongy...@gmail.com
2021-04-30 15:17:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.

The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.

And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see
for detailed info.

Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.

Regards,
HY
Oğuz
2021-04-30 19:51:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
Regards,
HY
David Kleinecke
2021-05-01 00:22:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.

I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
Tony Cooper
2021-05-01 00:57:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021 17:22:50 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
My high school friend joined the army after graduation in 1956. He
was sent to the Army language school in Monterey, California to learn
Russian. He was there six months, and then spent the remainder of his
two-year obligation in Turkey translating Russian radio broadcasts.
Each transmission was translated by two Russian-speakers and the
transcripts compared by a third person.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
hongy...@gmail.com
2021-05-01 01:21:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021 17:22:50 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
My high school friend joined the army after graduation in 1956. He
was sent to the Army language school in Monterey, California to learn
Russian. He was there six months, and then spent the remainder of his
two-year obligation in Turkey translating Russian radio broadcasts.
I think the above present participle phrase can be rewording into the following using an adjectival clause:

translating Russian radio broadcasts = which is translating Russian radio broadcasts

In its original form without my rephrasing, it can be regarded as the gerund apposition of *obligation*.

Am I right?
Post by Tony Cooper
Each transmission was translated by two Russian-speakers and the
transcripts compared by a third person.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Chrysi Cat
2021-05-01 08:34:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021 17:22:50 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
My high school friend joined the army after graduation in 1956. He
was sent to the Army language school in Monterey, California to learn
Russian. He was there six months, and then spent the remainder of his
two-year obligation in Turkey translating Russian radio broadcasts.
translating Russian radio broadcasts = which is translating Russian radio broadcasts
No. No. Good effing GOD/DESS no, you are not right.

FAR fewer phrases need to begin with a proposition than you believe
require one.

In this case "translating Russian radio broadcasts" is a gerund. It is
the action the friend was primarily involved in for the remaining
eighteen months of his enlistment. It is POSSIBLE that BrE would require
a comma after "in Turkey" (and a corresponding pause if read aloud); AmE
does not.
Post by ***@gmail.com
In its original form without my rephrasing, it can be regarded as the gerund apposition of *obligation*.
Am I right?
Post by Tony Cooper
Each transmission was translated by two Russian-speakers and the
transcripts compared by a third person.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Chrysi Cat
2021-05-01 08:40:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 30 Apr 2021 17:22:50 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18
November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator
from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an
introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of
comprehensible input works and physiological training for the
acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any
Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see
http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
My high school friend joined the army after graduation in 1956. He
was sent to the Army language school in Monterey, California to learn
Russian. He was there six months, and then spent the remainder of his
two-year obligation in Turkey translating Russian radio broadcasts.
I think the above present participle phrase can be rewording into the
translating Russian radio broadcasts = which is translating Russian radio broadcasts
No. No. Good effing GOD/DESS no, you are not right.
FAR fewer phrases need to begin with a proposition than you believe
require one.
In this case "translating Russian radio broadcasts" is a gerund. It is
the action the friend was primarily involved in for the remaining
eighteen months of his enlistment. It is POSSIBLE that BrE would require
a comma after "in Turkey" (and a corresponding pause if read aloud); AmE
does not.
This one actually incensed me so much that I left off a further
clarification. Even if it COULD take a preposition--this is REALLY not a
case of "needing" one, and it's not just unnecessary but actively
wrong--"which IS" is ridiculously bad in this case.

Tense is EVERYTHING in most even semi-standard dialects of English. Even
AAVE and Southern colloquial English have a full past/present
delineation; it's just that different verbs are used.

As far as I know there is not a single dialect of English where a
solitary "is" is EVER the proper conjugation for an event that took
place entirely in the past.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by ***@gmail.com
In its original form without my rephrasing, it can be regarded as the
gerund apposition of *obligation*.
Am I right?
Post by Tony Cooper
Each transmission was translated by two Russian-speakers and the
transcripts compared by a third person.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
s***@my-deja.com
2021-05-01 10:44:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Tense is EVERYTHING in most even semi-standard dialects of English. Even
AAVE and Southern colloquial English have a full past/present
delineation; it's just that different verbs are used.
As far as I know there is not a single dialect of English where a
solitary "is" is EVER the proper conjugation for an event that took
place entirely in the past.
Think L1 interference.
Tense does not exist in some languages - Chinese and Indonesian for example.
The past is covered by a time word.
Handling English tenses is not easy if your own language does not have any tenses.
CDB
2021-05-01 13:16:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[languages made easy]
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by David Kleinecke
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
My high school friend joined the army after graduation in 1956.
He was sent to the Army language school in Monterey, California
to learn Russian. He was there six months, and then spent the
remainder of his two-year obligation in Turkey translating
Russian radio broadcasts.
I think the above present participle phrase can be rewording into
translating Russian radio broadcasts = which is translating Russian radio broadcasts
No. No. Good effing GOD/DESS no, you are not right.
FAR fewer phrases need to begin with a proposition than you believe
require one.
In this case "translating Russian radio broadcasts" is a gerund. It
is the action the friend was primarily involved in for the remaining
eighteen months of his enlistment. It is POSSIBLE that BrE would
require a comma after "in Turkey" (and a corresponding pause if read
aloud); AmE does not.
Post by ***@gmail.com
In its original form without my rephrasing, it can be regarded as
the gerund apposition of *obligation*.
Am I right?
Post by Tony Cooper
Each transmission was translated by two Russian-speakers and the
transcripts compared by a third person.
I would call it a present participle modifying "he" in "[he] spent" (or
possibly the object of an omitted preposition "in", in an adverbial
phrase modifying "spent".

His "obligation" was his required military service.
hongy...@gmail.com
2021-05-01 01:11:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
GOK? What's the mean?
David Kleinecke
2021-05-01 04:22:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
GOK? What's the mean?
God only knows.

in more modern English "Only God knows".
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-01 14:43:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Kleinecke
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
GOK? What's the mean?
God only knows.
in more modern English "Only God knows".
? GOK is one of Brian Wilson's best songs (and it was unheard of to
invoke God in a pop song in those days.) I haven't heard OGK. Seems
like that would be used for a literal statement (in theology?).
CDB
2021-05-02 12:52:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Kleinecke
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
GOK? What's the mean?
God only knows.
in more modern English "Only God knows".
? GOK is one of Brian Wilson's best songs (and it was unheard of to
invoke God in a pop song in those days.) I haven't heard OGK. Seems
like that would be used for a literal statement (in theology?).
It may have been more common in the olden days: "Cupid only throws the
dart/ That's dreadful to the warrior's heart".


Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-02 16:59:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Kleinecke
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
GOK? What's the mean?
God only knows.
in more modern English "Only God knows".
? GOK is one of Brian Wilson's best songs (and it was unheard of to
invoke God in a pop song in those days.) I haven't heard OGK. Seems
like that would be used for a literal statement (in theology?).
It may have been more common in the olden days: "Cupid only throws the
dart/ That's dreadful to the warrior's heart".
Don't cite poetry when investigating Standard English.
Post by CDB
http://youtu.be/cCviE8bEWZw
And I certainly won't look at a video to try to guess what example of
"Only God knows" you're pointing me to.
CDB
2021-05-03 13:14:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Kleinecke
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they
do today.
GOK? What's the mean?
God only knows. in more modern English "Only God knows".
? GOK is one of Brian Wilson's best songs (and it was unheard of
to invoke God in a pop song in those days.) I haven't heard OGK.
Seems like that would be used for a literal statement (in
theology?).
It may have been more common in the olden days: "Cupid only throws
the dart/ That's dreadful to the warrior's heart".
Don't cite poetry when investigating Standard English.
In this case, "only Cupid" would have scanned just as well.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
http://youtu.be/cCviE8bEWZw
And I certainly won't look at a video to try to guess what example
of "Only God knows" you're pointing me to.
It's a rather good performance of the chorus from _Dido and Aeneas_.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-03 15:05:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by David Kleinecke
I imagine the schools are still with us but GOK what they do today.
GOK? What's the mean?
God only knows. in more modern English "Only God knows".
? GOK is one of Brian Wilson's best songs (and it was unheard of
to invoke God in a pop song in those days.) I haven't heard OGK.
Seems like that would be used for a literal statement (in
theology?).
It may have been more common in the olden days: "Cupid only throws
the dart/ That's dreadful to the warrior's heart".
Don't cite poetry when investigating Standard English.
In this case, "only Cupid" would have scanned just as well.
Different meanings in ModE prose: Cupid only throws -- he doesn't
use his bow (or attack with lethal means). Only Cupid throws -- no
one else does.
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
http://youtu.be/cCviE8bEWZw
And I certainly won't look at a video to try to guess what example
of "Only God knows" you're pointing me to.
It's a rather good performance of the chorus from _Dido and Aeneas_.
Ah. I have some good recordings. Knowing what it is, I went there --
I'm pretty sure I have that one.

Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-01 14:40:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
I think the Army Language Schools of WWII did something like that
but the learning times were not all 6 months. As I remember 6 months
for Serbo-Croatian but a year for Chinese.
Hmm, Carleton Hodge and Chas Hockett respectively.

Carleton also did Hausa in that context.
hongy...@gmail.com
2021-05-01 01:06:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
Regards,
HY
Chrysi Cat
2021-05-01 08:45:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
Literally? "Bullshit". That is to say, the excrement of a bovine.

It's been a vulgar way to say "nonsense and lies" for unknown decades or
even centuries. I'm not a linguist and I don't know how angry I'll get
if I speculate about relations between literal bullshit and a figurative
pile of fertiliser, or which direction that any analogies in that vein
might have originally run, but I will admit I have suspicions as to why
that's true.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
Regards,
HY
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
charles
2021-05-01 09:41:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
Literally? "Bullshit". That is to say, the excrement of a bovine.
It's been a vulgar way to say "nonsense and lies" for unknown decades or
even centuries. I'm not a linguist and I don't know how angry I'll get
if I speculate about relations between literal bullshit and a figurative
pile of fertiliser, or which direction that any analogies in that vein
might have originally run, but I will admit I have suspicions as to why
that's true.
I had a rubber stamp saying that which could be applied to various
documents "on circulation".
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Chrysi Cat
2021-05-01 09:55:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18
November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator
from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an
introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of
comprehensible input works and physiological training for the
acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any
Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see
http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
Literally? "Bullshit". That is to say, the excrement of a bovine.
It's been a vulgar way to say "nonsense and lies" for unknown decades or
even centuries. I'm not a linguist and I don't know how angry I'll get
--Woopsie. That's not supposed to mean "make myself angry" this time; I
went in and edited the sentence as it was originally written and removed
a "PTD" from it. As in "I'm not sure how much my speculating would irk
the linguist".
Post by Chrysi Cat
if I speculate about relations between literal bullshit and a figurative
pile of fertiliser, or which direction that any analogies in that vein
might have originally run, but I will admit I have suspicions as to why
that's true.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
Any hints/experiences/comments about this theory will be highly appreciated.
Regards,
HY
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-01 14:47:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
Literally? "Bullshit". That is to say, the excrement of a bovine.
It's been a vulgar way to say "nonsense and lies" for unknown decades or
even centuries. I'm not a linguist and I don't know how angry I'll get
--Woopsie. That's not supposed to mean "make myself angry" this time; I
went in and edited the sentence as it was originally written and removed
a "PTD" from it. As in "I'm not sure how much my speculating would irk
the linguist".
Linguists aren't lexicographers. We don't pay attention to fancied
word histories.
Mack A. Damia
2021-05-01 15:46:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18 November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of comprehensible input works and physiological training for the acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
Literally? "Bullshit". That is to say, the excrement of a bovine.
It's been a vulgar way to say "nonsense and lies" for unknown decades or
even centuries. I'm not a linguist and I don't know how angry I'll get
if I speculate about relations between literal bullshit and a figurative
pile of fertiliser, or which direction that any analogies in that vein
might have originally run, but I will admit I have suspicions as to why
that's true.
Yet bull shit is an excellent fertilizer as it doesn't contain weed
seed due to a complex four-compartment stomach. Not true with horse
dung.
Lewis
2021-05-01 10:18:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18
November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator
from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an
introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
He is saying your statement as it stands makes no sense. You may have
noticed, but you have to notice SOMETHING.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of
comprehensible input works and physiological training for the
acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some
months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any
Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see
http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
BS | ˌbiˈɛs |
abbreviation
1 US Bachelor of Science: she received her BS in biology from Aquinas College.
2 Blessed Sacrament.
3 North American vulgar slang used as a euphemism for “bullshit.”.
4 balance sheet.

I will leave it to you to figure out which one is intended.
--
'I like the sound of that,' said Mrs Palm. 'I like the echoes,' said
Dr Downey.
Ken Blake
2021-05-01 16:01:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18
November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator
from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an
introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
He is saying your statement as it stands makes no sense. You may have
noticed, but you have to notice SOMETHING.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of
comprehensible input works and physiological training for the
acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some
months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any
Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see
http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
BS | ˌbiˈɛs |
abbreviation
1 US Bachelor of Science: she received her BS in biology from Aquinas College.
2 Blessed Sacrament.
3 North American vulgar slang used as a euphemism for “bullshit.”.
4 balance sheet.
...and in supermarkets, at least around here, when referring to chicken
breasts, "boneless, skinless."

I still remember how startled I was the first time I saw an ad for
bullshit chicken breasts.
Post by Lewis
I will leave it to you to figure out which one is intended.
--
Ken
Lewis
2021-05-01 17:44:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18
November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator
from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an
introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
He is saying your statement as it stands makes no sense. You may have
noticed, but you have to notice SOMETHING.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of
comprehensible input works and physiological training for the
acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some
months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any
Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see
http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
BS | ˌbiˈɛs |
abbreviation
1 US Bachelor of Science: she received her BS in biology from Aquinas College.
2 Blessed Sacrament.
3 North American vulgar slang used as a euphemism for “bullshit.”.
4 balance sheet.
...and in supermarkets, at least around here, when referring to chicken
breasts, "boneless, skinless."
I still remember how startled I was the first time I saw an ad for
bullshit chicken breasts.
New one on me, but BS chicken breasts sounds about right for something
were the major sources of flavor have been removed.
--
"Are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"I think so, Brain, but can you use the word 'asphalt' in polite
society?"
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 21:49:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by ***@gmail.com
What does the BS stand for?
BS | ˌbiˈɛs |
abbreviation
1 US Bachelor of Science: she received her BS in biology from Aquinas College.
2 Blessed Sacrament.
3 North American vulgar slang used as a euphemism for “bullshit.”.
4 balance sheet.
I will leave it to you to figure out which one is intended.
Sometimes found in the triplet
BS bullshit
MS more shit
PhD piled higher and deeper
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
hongy...@gmail.com
2021-05-02 04:01:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
I noticed the introduction for Christopher John Lonsdale (born 18
November 1958), a New Zealand psychologist, linguist and educator
from <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Lonsdale_(entrepreneur)>.
You noticed what in there? Or, did you notice that there was an
introduction? Are you sure you know what "to notice" means?
Do you mean I misused this word here?
He is saying your statement as it stands makes no sense. You may have
noticed, but you have to notice SOMETHING.
Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by Oğuz
Post by ***@gmail.com
The wikipedia told me that Chris Lonsdale theorized the role of
comprehensible input works and physiological training for the
acquisition process of any language into the timespan of some
months.
And furthermore, I also found the speech titled with "Learn Any
Language in 6 Months" presented by Chris Lonsdale on youtube, see
http://youtu.be/ih3l7l_Mz6Q for detailed info.
Sounds like BS.
What does the BS stand for?
BS | ˌbiˈɛs |
abbreviation
1 US Bachelor of Science: she received her BS in biology from Aquinas College.
2 Blessed Sacrament.
3 North American vulgar slang used as a euphemism for “bullshit.”.
4 balance sheet.
I will leave it to you to figure out which one is intended.
Thank you for your notes. It should be 3 in this specific context.

HY
Post by Lewis
--
'I like the sound of that,' said Mrs Palm. 'I like the echoes,' said
Dr Downey.
Loading...