Discussion:
OT: Snowed in
(too old to reply)
Tony Cooper
2021-11-30 00:51:48 UTC
Permalink
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html

It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.

What group would it be your worst nightmare to be snowed in with:

1. Grampian Police Pipe Band

2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band

3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat

4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions

5. __________Your pick__________
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Sam Plusnet
2021-11-30 01:48:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel
of brandy around my neck.

(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
--
Sam Plusnet
Snidely
2021-11-30 02:19:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel of
brandy around my neck.
(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
You are weak.

/dps
--
"Inviting people to laugh with you while you are laughing at yourself
is a good thing to do, You may be a fool but you're the fool in
charge." -- Carl Reiner
occam
2021-11-30 10:27:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1.  Grampian Police Pipe Band
2.  Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3.  Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4.  International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5.  __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel
of brandy around my neck.
...not forgetting to leave behind a short note: "I am just going
outside and may be some time." (c) Captain Oates
Post by Sam Plusnet
(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
Sam Plusnet
2021-11-30 19:10:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1.  Grampian Police Pipe Band
2.  Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3.  Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4.  International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5.  __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel
of brandy around my neck.
(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
I'm clearly in the minority, but I like the sound of pipes.
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.

Having experienced a set of pipes being played at close quarters in a
pub[1]...
Never again.

[1] It was New Year's Eve, and for reasons lost in the mists of time it
is thought of as a Scottish celebration in England & Wales.

(I can't speak for NI on this.)
--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2021-11-30 20:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1.  Grampian Police Pipe Band
2.  Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3.  Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4.  International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5.  __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel
of brandy around my neck.
(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
I'm clearly in the minority, but I like the sound of pipes.
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Having experienced a set of pipes being played at close quarters in a
pub[1]...
Never again.
[1] It was New Year's Eve, and for reasons lost in the mists of time it
is thought of as a Scottish celebration in England & Wales.
(I can't speak for NI on this.)
I rather like the pipes, but in moderation. Snowbound for three days
with a group of pipers would be a bit much.

I group that I like - and have seen several times in person - includes
Kirk McLeod on the pipes. Seven Nations does alternative Celtic rock.


While the group tours nationally and internationally, they started
together in high school in Florida but didn't make it "big" until they
moved to NYC.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Lewis
2021-12-01 01:44:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1.  Grampian Police Pipe Band
2.  Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3.  Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4.  International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5.  __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel
of brandy around my neck.
(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
I'm clearly in the minority, but I like the sound of pipes.
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Having experienced a set of pipes being played at close quarters in a
pub[1]...
Never again.
[1] It was New Year's Eve, and for reasons lost in the mists of time it
is thought of as a Scottish celebration in England & Wales.
(I can't speak for NI on this.)
I rather like the pipes, but in moderation. Snowbound for three days
with a group of pipers would be a bit much.
I quite like bagpipes. Like any instrument they can be played poorly,
but when played well O certainly appreciate them.
--
Previous tenants try to evict new owners from a house
(Beetlejuice)
Peter Moylan
2021-12-02 02:11:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
I quite like bagpipes. Like any instrument they can be played
poorly, but when played well O certainly appreciate them.
Three or four years ago our choir sang the song "Working Man", backed by
a pipe band. I didn't like the effect myself, but the audience liked it.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Madhu
2021-12-01 03:25:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.

I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
Ken Blake
2021-12-01 15:55:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
charles
2021-12-01 16:19:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
my grandmother, in the early 20th C, brought a piano, but she wasn't a
tourist
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Ken Blake
2021-12-01 17:00:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
my grandmother, in the early 20th C, brought a piano, but she wasn't a
tourist
Shipping something large to stay there is understandable, but bringing
it with you temporarily, as a tourist, is another matter entirely.

I play the guitar, but when I travel as a tourist, I never bring it with
me; even that is much too large.
Lewis
2021-12-01 22:27:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
my grandmother, in the early 20th C, brought a piano, but she wasn't a
tourist
Shipping something large to stay there is understandable, but bringing
it with you temporarily, as a tourist, is another matter entirely.
I play the guitar, but when I travel as a tourist, I never bring it with
me; even that is much too large.
I am not a musician, but I would definitely not travel with something
as large as a guitar. That said, I see people traveling with their
guitars quite frequently.
--
Don't ride in anything with a Capissen-38 engine, they fall right out
of the sky
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-01 23:06:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
my grandmother, in the early 20th C, brought a piano, but she wasn't a
tourist
Shipping something large to stay there is understandable, but bringing
it with you temporarily, as a tourist, is another matter entirely.
I play the guitar, but when I travel as a tourist, I never bring it with
me; even that is much too large.
I am not a musician, but I would definitely not travel with something
as large as a guitar. That said, I see people traveling with their
guitars quite frequently.
When my wife was learning to play the guitar she bought a ukulele to
take on holiday.
--
Sam Plusnet
Ken Blake
2021-12-01 23:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
my grandmother, in the early 20th C, brought a piano, but she wasn't a
tourist
Shipping something large to stay there is understandable, but bringing
it with you temporarily, as a tourist, is another matter entirely.
I play the guitar, but when I travel as a tourist, I never bring it with
me; even that is much too large.
I am not a musician, but I would definitely not travel with something
as large as a guitar. That said, I see people traveling with their
guitars quite frequently.
When my wife was learning to play the guitar she bought a ukulele to
take on holiday.
That seems odd to me. Although there are clearly some simularities, they
are very different instruments. I wouldn't do that.
Peter Moylan
2021-12-03 00:47:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
When my wife was learning to play the guitar she bought a ukulele
to take on holiday.
That seems odd to me. Although there are clearly some simularities,
they are very different instruments. I wouldn't do that.
She was clearly under the influence of the UOGB.
(Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain)
A friend of mine, who has no musical background that I know of, bought a
ukelele and joined a ukelele orchestra. That made me realise the major
virtue of a ukelele: it's easy to learn, and easy to play. Much easier
on the left hand than a guitar.

A couple of years ago I gave a toy ukelele to one of my grandaughters.
The quality was crap, but you don't give good-quality instruments to
pre-school children. The other day I noticed that her father, who plays
guitar, has given her a better-quality ukelele now that she's five years
old.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Tony Cooper
2021-12-03 01:07:08 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Dec 2021 11:47:35 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
a better-quality ukelele
The thing I like about aue is the subtle humor that is so frequently
seen here. In this case, the deapan use of an oxymoron.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-12-03 07:38:31 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 02 Dec 2021 20:07:08 -0500
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 3 Dec 2021 11:47:35 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
a better-quality ukelele
The thing I like about aue is the subtle humor that is so frequently
seen here. In this case, the deapan use of an oxymoron.
I don't think I've ever had a deep-pan oxymoron.

("Ooh, ooh, Miss! he used the PTD word!")
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Quinn C
2021-12-03 18:39:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
On Thu, 02 Dec 2021 20:07:08 -0500
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 3 Dec 2021 11:47:35 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
a better-quality ukelele
The thing I like about aue is the subtle humor that is so frequently
seen here. In this case, the deapan use of an oxymoron.
I don't think I've ever had a deep-pan oxymoron.
I think they have them only in Chicago.
--
Statler: I was just thinking, apropos of nothing, but is it
pronounced tomayto or tomahto?
Waldorf: Is what pronounced tomayto or tomahto?
Peter Moylan
2021-12-02 02:03:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
On 30-Nov-21 16:07, Ken Blake wrote: We were once on a
beach in Devon. A tiny figure in the distance turned out
to be a piper, perched on a rocky outcrop, overlooking
the sea. At that distance the pipes were audible and
quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly
a rock overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?)
in india. I had gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen
any one for half an hour and was alarmed when I heard the
sounds and they kept growing. I crossed him but he seemed
to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments
to india to practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp
(if it's a small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
my grandmother, in the early 20th C, brought a piano, but she
wasn't a tourist
Shipping something large to stay there is understandable, but
bringing it with you temporarily, as a tourist, is another matter
entirely.
I play the guitar, but when I travel as a tourist, I never bring
it with me; even that is much too large.
I am not a musician, but I would definitely not travel with
something as large as a guitar. That said, I see people traveling
with their guitars quite frequently.
When my wife was learning to play the guitar she bought a ukulele to
take on holiday.
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.

I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Peter Moylan
2021-12-02 02:12:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
charles
2021-12-02 09:16:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Nt loose, but certainly not at full tension.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Ken Blake
2021-12-02 17:34:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard Heathfield
2021-12-02 17:55:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Mark Brader
2021-12-03 13:24:10 UTC
Permalink
The baggage hold [on an airliner] is pressurized,
Depends on the plane, of course. Or are you claiming that all baggage
holds are pressurised? Because I'm pretty sure that's not true.
As long as the baggage hold is below the passenger cabin within a
cylindrical fuselage, it would make no sense not to pressurize it.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "My pasta, what stop does it close down to?"
***@vex.net | --Lee Ayrton
Richard Heathfield
2021-12-03 14:14:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
The baggage hold [on an airliner] is pressurized,
Depends on the plane, of course. Or are you claiming that all baggage
holds are pressurised? Because I'm pretty sure that's not true.
As long as the baggage hold is below the passenger cabin within a
cylindrical fuselage, it would make no sense not to pressurize it.
Certainly true for larger aircraft - big airliners, for example.

But I doubt whether, say, the Cessna Model A has a pressurised baggage
hold or indeed a pressurised cabin. (Admittedly at a 2000m ceiling
that's only a 20% drop in pressure, so detuning might not matter so much
as it would for the 75% drop at 10,000m.)
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Mark Brader
2021-12-03 18:15:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Mark Brader
The baggage hold [on an airliner] is pressurized,
Depends on the plane, of course. Or are you claiming that all baggage
holds are pressurised? Because I'm pretty sure that's not true.
As long as the baggage hold is below the passenger cabin within a
cylindrical fuselage, it would make no sense not to pressurize it.
Certainly true for larger aircraft - big airliners, for example.
But I doubt whether, say, the Cessna Model A has a pressurised baggage
hold or indeed a pressurised cabin...
Context, man, context!
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "'Run me,' Alice?"
***@vex.net -- Tom Neff

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Richard Heathfield
2021-12-03 18:43:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Mark Brader
The baggage hold [on an airliner] is pressurized,
Depends on the plane, of course. Or are you claiming that all baggage
holds are pressurised? Because I'm pretty sure that's not true.
As long as the baggage hold is below the passenger cabin within a
cylindrical fuselage, it would make no sense not to pressurize it.
Certainly true for larger aircraft - big airliners, for example.
But I doubt whether, say, the Cessna Model A has a pressurised baggage
hold or indeed a pressurised cabin...
Context, man, context!
Indeed. The point about de-tuning guitars before travel was raised
because of the damage that can occur if strings are not slackened at the
start of the trip, one obvious example being unpressurised baggage
holds. The context is therefore unpressurised holds. Clearly pressurised
baggage holds are not going to be unpressurised.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-03 20:20:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Indeed. The point about de-tuning guitars before travel was raised
because of the damage that can occur if strings are not slackened at the
start of the trip, one obvious example being unpressurised baggage
holds. The context is therefore unpressurised holds. Clearly pressurised
baggage holds are not going to be unpressurised.
Jumping in to join the fun.
A pressurised baggage hold which is suddenly depressurised could do much
more damage than an unpressurised one.
--
Sam Plusnet
Mark Brader
2021-12-03 20:55:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
A pressurised baggage hold which is suddenly depressurised could do much
more damage than an unpressurised one.
In 1974 it killed 346 people.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Why, I make more money than Calvin Coolidge,
***@vex.net | put together!" -- SINGIN' IN THE RAIN
Ken Blake
2021-12-03 16:00:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized, well insulated and can be
heated. Temperature should not go below freezing. In a
767 it is maintained at 7˚C but can be raised to 18˚C (for
pets, for example).
I'm not sure what professionals do when flying to a concert with a
guitar, but I wouldnit want to put mine in the luggage compartment. Even
with a high-qaulity case, there'd too much risk of its being thrown
around and smashed or crushed under the weight of other luggage.

Can it be put in an overhead bin? I don't know.
Snidely
2021-12-03 20:15:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized, well insulated and can be
heated. Temperature should not go below freezing. In a
767 it is maintained at 7˚C but can be raised to 18˚C (for
pets, for example).
I'm not sure what professionals do when flying to a concert with a guitar,
but I wouldnit want to put mine in the luggage compartment. Even with a
high-qaulity case, there'd too much risk of its being thrown around and
smashed or crushed under the weight of other luggage.
Can it be put in an overhead bin? I don't know.
Probably, but to the ire of those trying to stuff their carry-on with 3
weeks of clothing changes into the same space.

There are some checked items carried near the front door on some
flights, but the "buy an extra seat" technique is what I hear about the
most.

I'm pretty sure there is at least one concert pianist who tours the US
with his own piano because the "action is right" on that one. That
won't go in the overhead.

/dps
--
Trust, but verify.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-12-03 20:48:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snidely
I'm pretty sure there is at least one concert pianist who tours the US
with his own piano because the "action is right" on that one. That
won't go in the overhead.
Eugene Istomin toured with his Steinway Concert Grand in a giant
truck -- because most of the places he played didn't have any sort
of concert-worthy instrument at all.

Now if he'd come to Chicago after 1980 or so, the Cultural Center
(the former home of the Chicago Public Library) had an immense
Bösendorfer with an extra octave (or maybe broken octave) in the
bass.
bil...@shaw.ca
2021-12-04 06:43:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snidely
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized, well insulated and can be
heated. Temperature should not go below freezing. In a
767 it is maintained at 7˚C but can be raised to 18˚C (for
pets, for example).
I'm not sure what professionals do when flying to a concert with a guitar,
but I wouldnit want to put mine in the luggage compartment. Even with a
high-qaulity case, there'd too much risk of its being thrown around and
smashed or crushed under the weight of other luggage.
Can it be put in an overhead bin? I don't know.
Probably, but to the ire of those trying to stuff their carry-on with 3
weeks of clothing changes into the same space.
There are some checked items carried near the front door on some
flights, but the "buy an extra seat" technique is what I hear about the
most.
I'm pretty sure there is at least one concert pianist who tours the US
with his own piano because the "action is right" on that one. That
won't go in the overhead.
Some acts carry a lot of equipment. When I walk to downtown Vancouver I
sometimes see a 50-foot semi with a band's name on it being or unloaded
behind one of the theatres that feature live music. The equipment travels
by truck, and the musicians generally fly in on the day of the first show.

bill
Tak To
2021-12-03 20:41:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized, well insulated and can be
heated. Temperature should not go below freezing. In a
767 it is maintained at 7˚C but can be raised to 18˚C (for
pets, for example).
I'm not sure what professionals do when flying to a concert with a
guitar, but I wouldnit want to put mine in the luggage compartment. Even
with a high-qaulity case, there'd too much risk of its being thrown
around and smashed or crushed under the weight of other luggage.
Can it be put in an overhead bin? I don't know.
For a cello or double bass, I think the standard practice is
to buy an extra ticket and strap the instrument to the seat.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Mark Brader
2021-12-04 04:11:24 UTC
Permalink
My wife ran into trouble at work a couple of days ago because she had
her phone on her desk. A shelf fell from above...
The management is now blaming her for having her personal phone at work.
Her immediate supervisor has now written a long note explaining the
things at work that could not be done without a personal phone.
I'm getting annoyed at places where they assume that everyone carries
a cellphone. What things at work would those be?
--
Mark Brader | Does anybody seriously believe that if a bunch of horses
Toronto | saw a giant egg broken into pieces, their response would
***@vex.net | be: "Hey! Let's try to reassemble this!"? --Dave Barry
Peter Moylan
2021-12-04 04:35:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
My wife ran into trouble at work a couple of days ago because she
had her phone on her desk. A shelf fell from above...
The management is now blaming her for having her personal phone at
work. Her immediate supervisor has now written a long note
explaining the things at work that could not be done without a
personal phone.
I'm getting annoyed at places where they assume that everyone carries
a cellphone. What things at work would those be?
To begin with, to get through the door. The phone holds her vaccination
certificate.

Beyond that I don't know the full details, but I believe it often
requires parallel phone conversations, and they only get one work phone
per person.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Lewis
2021-12-04 14:42:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
My wife ran into trouble at work a couple of days ago because she had
her phone on her desk. A shelf fell from above...
The management is now blaming her for having her personal phone at work.
Her immediate supervisor has now written a long note explaining the
things at work that could not be done without a personal phone.
I'm getting annoyed at places where they assume that everyone carries
a cellphone.
Everyone DOES carry a cell/mobile phone. (Where, of course "everyone"
means "the vast majority of people, including kids and olds"). I am
trying to think of anyone I know, even casually, who doesn't carry a
mobile and I cannot come up with anyone at all.
Post by Mark Brader
What things at work would those be?
Evidently there's a list.
--
I'm the best singer in Tasmania. With teeth.
Ken Blake
2021-12-04 15:54:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Mark Brader
I'm getting annoyed at places where they assume that everyone carries
a cellphone.
Everyone DOES carry a cell/mobile phone. (Where, of course "everyone"
means "the vast majority of people, including kids and olds").
The "vast majority" is probably true in most countries, but not
necessarily all.
Post by Lewis
I am
trying to think of anyone I know, even casually, who doesn't carry a
mobile and I cannot come up with anyone at all.
I know one elderly woman who doesn't, and my wife is very close to being
a second one. She carries a call phone, but it's not a smart phone, just
an old, cheap flip-top, and she also almost never turns it on.
Lewis
2021-12-04 14:33:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized, well insulated and can be
heated.  Temperature should not go below freezing.  In a
767 it is maintained at 7˚C but can be raised to 18˚C (for
pets, for example).
I'm not sure what professionals do when flying to a concert with a
guitar, but I wouldnit want to put mine in the luggage compartment. Even
with a high-qaulity case, there'd too much risk of its being thrown
around and smashed or crushed under the weight of other luggage.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Breaks_Guitars
To be fair, United breaks everything they can.
--
It's against my programming to impersonate a deity.
Ken Blake
2021-12-03 16:10:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized,
Can be, can be. You're right there. Can indeed. Depends on the plane, of
course. Or are you claiming that all baggage holds are pressurised?
Because I'm pretty sure that's not true. I remember reading of a
well-known band losing a guitar on tour because of depressurisation (I
set about tracking down an account on the Web with naïf confidence, but
of course I couldn't find it anywhere).
Of course, even at ground level car journeys have their own hazards...
"Fourteen of our guitars were strapped to the roof of our Austin
Princess and the only one lost was my Gretsch. It fell onto the road and
into the path of the oncoming traffic. About thirteen lorries went over
it before our chauffeur could get near it. Then, one of the lorries
stopped and the driver came up with the dangling remains of it and said,
'Oi, is this banjo anything to do with you?' Some people would say I
shouldn’t worry because I could buy as many replacement guitars as I
wanted, but you know how it is, I kind of got attached to it." - George
Harrison.
Yes, you can buy as many replacements as you want, but you can't
necessarily buy the same classical guitar or even one of the same
quality. And even if you could, it might be very expensive and might
take a long time to get it.

Foe example, David Russell (arguably the best classical guitarist in the
world) plays a Damman guitar. Out of curiosity, a couple of months ago I
looked for one for sale on the internet. I found none for sale, and the
last one that had been sold went for $60,000.
In Mr Harrison's case, de-tuning probably wouldn't have helped much.
Tak To
2021-12-03 20:37:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized,
Can be, can be. You're right there. Can indeed. Depends on the plane, of
course. Or are you claiming that all baggage holds are pressurised?
Yes, for the kind of airplanes used for commercial flights from
Australia to Europe, as in Peter Moylan's.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Richard Heathfield
2021-12-03 20:52:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized,
Can be, can be. You're right there. Can indeed. Depends on the plane, of
course. Or are you claiming that all baggage holds are pressurised?
Yes, for the kind of airplanes used for commercial flights from
Australia to Europe, as in Peter Moylan's.
Well played, sir!
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Peter Moylan
2021-12-04 00:47:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my
own car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight,
though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized,
Can be, can be. You're right there. Can indeed. Depends on the
plane, of course. Or are you claiming that all baggage holds are
pressurised?
Yes, for the kind of airplanes used for commercial flights from
Australia to Europe, as in Peter Moylan's.
My next scheduled flight is from Sydney to Launceston. They use smaller
planes for that, I believe. Since I don't intend to take a guitar, I
haven't checked on whether the baggage holds are pressurised.

There used to be a commuter airline flying the Newcastle-Sydney route
using very small planes. (About 10 passengers, I think.) I wouldn't have
been nervous about taking a guitar on that one, because the plane never
got high enough to make it an issue.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Lewis
2021-12-04 14:35:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before transporting
it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Does your car fly at 30,000 ft?
Why does it matter?
The baggage hold is pressurized,
Can be, can be. You're right there. Can indeed. Depends on the plane, of
course. Or are you claiming that all baggage holds are pressurised?
Yes, for the kind of airplanes used for commercial flights from
Australia to Europe, as in Peter Moylan's.
I think the majority of commercial jets have pressurized baggage holds,
Maybe not some of the smaller turbo prop planes, but if a plane's cargo
isn’t pressurized it cannot carry pets or other animals, and that would
be a problem people would notice.
--
CURSIVE WRITING DOES NOT MEAN WHAT I THINK IT DOES Bart chalkboard
Ep. 2F11
Peter Moylan
2021-12-03 00:52:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the guitar
can get hot even if you have air conditioning. (When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a risk of
distortion.

On a twenty-minute trip it's no big deal. On a twenty-hour drive it matters.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Ken Blake
2021-12-03 16:21:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the guitar
can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk. And
that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a risk of
distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I remember
once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I brought it
into the barber shop.
Post by Peter Moylan
On a twenty-minute trip it's no big deal. On a twenty-hour drive it matters.
Tony Cooper
2021-12-03 17:07:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the guitar
can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk. And
that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a risk of
distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I remember
once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I brought it
into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while getting
the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the open case to
pay for the haircut.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-12-03 19:59:36 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 03 Dec 2021 12:07:47 -0500
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the
guitar can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk.
And that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a
risk of distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I
remember once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I
brought it into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while getting
the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the open case to
pay for the haircut.
See if you can get a shave included in the same price.
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-03 20:28:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the guitar
can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk. And
that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a risk of
distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I remember
once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I brought it
into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while getting
the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the open case to
pay for the haircut.
Is there an updated version of "Shave and a haircut - two bits"?
--
Sam Plusnet
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-12-03 20:51:21 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 3 Dec 2021 20:28:21 +0000
Post by Sam Plusnet
On Fri, 3 Dec 2021 09:21:17 -0700, Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the
guitar can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk.
And that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a
risk of distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I
remember once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I
brought it into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while
getting the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the
open case to pay for the haircut.
Is there an updated version of "Shave and a haircut - two bits"?
I'd imagine it's gone up a bit (or maybe 2) in the meantime.
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
CDB
2021-12-04 13:57:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my
own car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight,
though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip,
the guitar can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk.
And that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch, the sun keeps shining through onto
your luggage.) That creates a risk of distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I
remember once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson.
I brought it into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while
getting the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the
open case to pay for the haircut.
Is there an updated version of "Shave and a haircut - two bits"?
In Mexico, they have long updated it to "chinga tu madre, cabrón".
--
Rey Aman memorial outrage
Lewis
2021-12-04 14:45:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my
own car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight,
though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip,
the guitar can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk.
And that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch, the sun keeps shining through onto
your luggage.) That creates a risk of distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I
remember once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson.
I brought it into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while
getting the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the
open case to pay for the haircut.
Is there an updated version of "Shave and a haircut - two bits"?
In Mexico, they have long updated it to "chinga tu madre, cabrón".
I thought it was "chinga tu madre, y tu".
--
I'll have what the gentleman on the floor is having.
Jerry Friedman
2021-12-04 16:18:56 UTC
Permalink
...
Post by Lewis
Post by CDB
Post by Sam Plusnet
Is there an updated version of "Shave and a haircut - two bits"?
In Mexico, they have long updated it to "chinga tu madre, cabrón".
I thought it was "chinga tu madre, y tu".
Or "y a tí"? Asking in order to improve my Spanish, which is not good.
That's what I'd expect (except no accent on "ti"), but I don't speak Mexican
profanity.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2021-12-04 01:01:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the guitar
can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk. And
that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a risk of
distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I remember
once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I brought it
into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while getting
the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the open case to
pay for the haircut.
To perform in a barber shop you have to bring three other singers with you.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
lar3ryca
2021-12-04 01:09:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the guitar
can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk. And
that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a risk of
distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I remember
once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I brought it
into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while getting
the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the open case to
pay for the haircut.
To perform in a barber shop you have to bring three other singers with you.
It's been a while since this entered my mind...

How many balls does an all-male quartet have?
Ken Blake
2021-12-04 15:55:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own
car. I wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
P.S. It's important to detune any string instrument before
transporting it, so that the strings are loose.
Why? I've never done that when putting the guitar in a car.
Richard gave one reason. Here's another. On a long car trip, the guitar
can get hot even if you have air conditioning.
Not in my experience. Keep it in the back seat, not in the trunk. And
that's only a potential issue in the summer.
Post by Peter Moylan
(When you stop for lunch,
the sun keeps shining through onto your luggage.) That creates a risk of
distortion.
Bring it into the restaurant instead of leaving it the car. I remember
once stopping for a haircut while driving to my lesson. I brought it
into the barber shop.
You should have left the case open and played something while getting
the haircut. Enough money may have been dropped into the open case to
pay for the haircut.
To perform in a barber shop you have to bring three other singers with you.
<g>
Peter T. Daniels
2021-12-02 15:34:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
I play the guitar, but when I travel as a tourist, I never bring
it with me; even that is much too large.
I am not a musician, but I would definitely not travel with
something as large as a guitar. That said, I see people traveling
with their guitars quite frequently.
When my wife was learning to play the guitar she bought a ukulele to
take on holiday.
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
... and then there was the time Mr. Ma left his near-priceless cello
in the trunk of a cab ... What a yo-yo.
Ken Blake
2021-12-02 17:33:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by Ken Blake
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
On 30-Nov-21 16:07, Ken Blake wrote: We were once on a
beach in Devon. A tiny figure in the distance turned out
to be a piper, perched on a rocky outcrop, overlooking
the sea. At that distance the pipes were audible and
quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly
a rock overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?)
in india. I had gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen
any one for half an hour and was alarmed when I heard the
sounds and they kept growing. I crossed him but he seemed
to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments
to india to practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp
(if it's a small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
my grandmother, in the early 20th C, brought a piano, but she
wasn't a tourist
Shipping something large to stay there is understandable, but
bringing it with you temporarily, as a tourist, is another matter
entirely.
I play the guitar, but when I travel as a tourist, I never bring
it with me; even that is much too large.
I am not a musician, but I would definitely not travel with
something as large as a guitar. That said, I see people traveling
with their guitars quite frequently.
When my wife was learning to play the guitar she bought a ukulele to
take on holiday.
We once took my son's violin to Europe, but I was nervous about it.
I take my guitar on the sort of trip where I'm driving my own car. I
wouldn't take it on an airline flight, though.
Same for me. I said "... but when I travel as a tourist...," but I
should have said ...but when I fly as a tourist..." I've taken it twice
in a car.
Jerry Friedman
2021-12-03 15:29:40 UTC
Permalink
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
--
Jerry Friedman
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-03 20:30:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
Dunno, but I'm pretty certain they don't fit a double bass into an
economy-class seat.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Moylan
2021-12-04 01:03:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
Dunno, but I'm pretty certain they don't fit a double bass into an
economy-class seat.
It's hard enough fitting a human into an economy-class seat.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Lewis
2021-12-04 14:28:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
Dunno, but I'm pretty certain they don't fit a double bass into an
economy-class seat.
I think the most common way to take a lager musical instrument on a
plane is to pack it in a custom hard case (like a Pelican case used for
high-end photo equipment) and transport it as cargo. This is probably
the best choice for a cello as well.
--
@mdhughes: One of the few regrets I have about lawn-less apartments:
Shallow graves are so much harder to come by.
Jerry Friedman
2021-12-04 14:57:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
Dunno, but I'm pretty certain they don't fit a double bass into an
economy-class seat.
I think the most common way to take a lager musical instrument on a
plane is to pack it in a custom hard case (like a Pelican case used for
high-end photo equipment) and transport it as cargo. This is probably
the best choice for a cello as well.
The article I quoted says, "You should assume that anything you check
will a) get lost or b) get destroyed. If you can easily replace your cello
because it is low cost and low quality, then checking it is fine. If your
cello is a great find (low price, high quality) or a fine instrument (high
price, rare quality) where insurance would not easily find a replacement,
or an antique, you should never check it. Buy a seat instead. There is no
such thing as a flight-safe case."

https://gregorybeaver.com/the-2017-guide-to-flying-with-a-cello-f27439d329ec

Personally I wouldn't know.
--
Jerry Friedman
Ken Blake
2021-12-04 15:58:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
I think the most common way to take a lager musical instrument on a
plane is to pack it in a custom hard case (like a Pelican case used for
high-end photo equipment) and transport it as cargo. This is probably
the best choice for a cello as well.
Is the same true of ale musical instruments?
musika
2021-12-04 16:40:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
I think the most common way to take a lager musical instrument on
a plane is to pack it in a custom hard case (like a Pelican case
used for high-end photo equipment) and transport it as cargo. This
is probably the best choice for a cello as well.
Is the same true of ale musical instruments?
That would beer mistake.
--
Ray
UK
Tony Cooper
2021-12-04 15:32:45 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 4 Dec 2021 07:11:51 -0800 (PST), Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
Dunno, but I'm pretty certain they don't fit a double bass into an
economy-class seat.
...
There's contradictory advice on line about basses. Most people say, as
you did, that you can't buy a seat for it--it probably won't even fit through
the plane's door. Some people say to get a flight case and check it as
baggage, contrary to the advice at that cello page, and some people say
to ship it by a specialized musical-instrument shipper or rent a bass
where you're performing.
On the other hand, if you happen to be skinny-dipping in a lake and
someone steals your clothes...
When my son was in grade school he was in the school band. He chose
the tuba as his instrument. His reasoning was that no one else choose
the tuba, so being "first tuba" was a lock.

https://folio.ink/grfMc

It's a good thing he didn't go on to be a professional tubaist.
Traveling with a tuba would be troublesome.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Quinn C
2021-12-04 15:53:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
Dunno, but I'm pretty certain they don't fit a double bass into an
economy-class seat.
...
There's contradictory advice on line about basses. Most people say, as
you did, that you can't buy a seat for it--it probably won't even fit through
the plane's door.
That last thing seems very dubitable. If true, there should be a lot of
people not fitting through that door, either.
--
Certain writers assert very decidedly that no pronouns are
needed beyond those we already possess, but this is simply a
dogmatic opinion, unsupported by the facts.
-- Findlay (OH) Jeffersonian (1875)
Ken Blake
2021-12-04 16:02:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Sam Plusnet
A friend of mine in grad school spent a summer doing research
in France. He was a good amateur cellist and took his
instrument along by buying a seat for Mr. V. Cello.
Today he would need a passport in that name, or the airline would refuse
to cooperate.
Really? I wonder how touring cellists and bassists manage.
Dunno, but I'm pretty certain they don't fit a double bass into an
economy-class seat.
...
There's contradictory advice on line about basses. Most people say, as
you did, that you can't buy a seat for it--it probably won't even fit through
the plane's door.
That last thing seems very dubitable. If true, there should be a lot of
people not fitting through that door, either.
Especially if they were fat little tubas puffing away
Quinn C
2021-12-01 17:46:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
That'll depend entirely on the size of the xylophone. The ones we had in
school will pose no problem.

<Loading Image...>

People bring bicycles on planes, and even a large xylophone (with a
collapsible stand) won't be larger than that.
--
No ... it's a good thing that one of the most famous bigots
in the country [now supports Bernie].
-- Page Kreisman, talking about Joe Rogan
Ken Blake
2021-12-01 18:51:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
That'll depend entirely on the size of the xylophone. The ones we had in
school will pose no problem.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xylophone#/media/File:Tres_xil%C3%B3fonos.JPG>
As far as I'm concerned, those are toys, not real xylophones.
Ken Blake
2021-12-01 18:53:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Madhu
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
Strangely enough I've come across a piper piping similarly a rock
overlooking the water on the konkan coast (gokarna?) in india. I had
gone off the usual trail and I hadn't seen any one for half an hour and
was alarmed when I heard the sounds and they kept growing. I crossed
him but he seemed to be too engrossed to acknowledge any presence.
I think quite a few brit tourists bring their instruments to india to
practice, xylophones, harps. but even pipes
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
That'll depend entirely on the size of the xylophone. The ones we had in
school will pose no problem.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xylophone#/media/File:Tres_xil%C3%B3fonos.JPG>
As far as I'm concerned, those are toys, not real xylophones.
You can see a picture of a real xylophone here:
https://www.yamaha.com/en/musical_instrument_guide/marimba/structure/structure003.html
Quinn C
2021-12-01 19:35:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
That'll depend entirely on the size of the xylophone. The ones we had in
school will pose no problem.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xylophone#/media/File:Tres_xil%C3%B3fonos.JPG>
As far as I'm concerned, those are toys, not real xylophones.
And then you stopped reading?

Besides, the ones in the picture aren't toys any more than a ukulele is
a toy guitar.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Jerry Friedman
2021-12-02 20:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
With some difficulty, I can imagine a tourist bringing a harp (if it's a
small one) or pipes, but a xylophone?
That'll depend entirely on the size of the xylophone. The ones we had in
school will pose no problem.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xylophone#/media/File:Tres_xil%C3%B3fonos.JPG>
I have a fond memory of the Orff instruments.
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
As far as I'm concerned, those are toys, not real xylophones.
And then you stopped reading?
Besides, the ones in the picture aren't toys any more than a ukulele is
a toy guitar.
Wait, what?
--
Jerry Friedman
Stefan Ram
2021-12-01 14:08:57 UTC
Permalink
passengers. It's packed to the gunwhales on Highland Games Day.
"Gunwhales" is sometimes also spelled "gunwales".

The word "gunwale" is famously used in "Star Trek:
Discovery", S03E08, "The Sanctuary":

|DETMER: What's my target?
|RYN: Where the gunwale meets the aft nacelles.
|DETMER: Sensors aren't showing any damage.
| Am I hitting this thing or what?
from "Star Trek: Discovery", S03E08, "The Sanctuary"
Janet
2021-12-01 14:31:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
passengers. It's packed to the gunwhales on Highland Games Day.
"Gunwhales" is sometimes also spelled "gunwales".
Always, probably. Pronounced gunnels. I don't think I'd ever written
it before.

Janet
Post by Stefan Ram
|DETMER: What's my target?
|RYN: Where the gunwale meets the aft nacelles.
|DETMER: Sensors aren't showing any damage.
| Am I hitting this thing or what?
from "Star Trek: Discovery", S03E08, "The Sanctuary"
Richard Heathfield
2021-12-01 14:16:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
We lived in what a visitor described to her child as "the back of
nowhere". Of course, as soon as they arrived her child asked me if this
really was the back of nowhere. Yes, it was. We lived in the back of
nowhere for 20 years, during which a solo piper used to park in the
hills even further back of nowhere to practise the pipes without
disturbing anyone. Distant and rather pleasant.
When the back of nowhere became the road to somewhere it got much too
busy and noisy so we uptsticksed to an island.
Once a year, at the Island Highland Games, multiple (bag)pipe bands
from all over Scotland arrive by ferry to compete in out-piping each
other. Our place is just above the harbour. The ferry accommodates 1000
passengers. It's packed to the gunwhales on Highland Games Day.
The rival bands arrive piping and drumming on the open top deck of the
ferry/. They march off in formation, piping, to the Highland Games
arena which is only at the other end of the (small) village. They
compete, loudly. Then the winners/losers either celebrate or drown their
sorrows with alcohol, so get very drunk. Then all the inebriated pipe
bands from all over Scotland march all the way back to the ferry ALL
PIPING DIFFERENT TUNES. Time for a few more beers and tunes before the
ferry departs

veni, vidi, stiti. Why not call out the council? Noise Abatement Officer
or some such.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
charles
2021-12-01 15:19:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
We lived in what a visitor described to her child as "the back of
nowhere". Of course, as soon as they arrived her child asked me if this
really was the back of nowhere. Yes, it was. We lived in the back of
nowhere for 20 years, during which a solo piper used to park in the
hills even further back of nowhere to practise the pipes without
disturbing anyone. Distant and rather pleasant.
When the back of nowhere became the road to somewhere it got much too
busy and noisy so we uptsticksed to an island.
Once a year, at the Island Highland Games, multiple (bag)pipe bands
from all over Scotland arrive by ferry to compete in out-piping each
other. Our place is just above the harbour. The ferry accommodates 1000
passengers. It's packed to the gunwhales on Highland Games Day.
The rival bands arrive piping and drumming on the open top deck of the
ferry/. They march off in formation, piping, to the Highland Games
arena which is only at the other end of the (small) village. They
compete, loudly. Then the winners/losers either celebrate or drown their
sorrows with alcohol, so get very drunk. Then all the inebriated pipe
bands from all over Scotland march all the way back to the ferry ALL
PIPING DIFFERENT TUNES. Time for a few more beers and tunes before the
ferry departs
http://youtu.be/JBXyiMEK0bc
veni, vidi, stiti. Why not call out the council? Noise Abatement Officer
or some such.
he/she is probably in one of the bands
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
charles
2021-12-01 15:16:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
We were once on a beach in Devon.
A tiny figure in the distance turned out to be a piper, perched on a
rocky outcrop, overlooking the sea.
At that distance the pipes were audible and quite acceptable.
We lived in what a visitor described to her child as "the back of
nowhere". Of course, as soon as they arrived her child asked me if this
really was the back of nowhere. Yes, it was. We lived in the back of
nowhere for 20 years, during which a solo piper used to park in the
hills even further back of nowhere to practise the pipes without
disturbing anyone. Distant and rather pleasant.
When the back of nowhere became the road to somewhere it got much too
busy and noisy so we uptsticksed to an island.
Once a year, at the Island Highland Games, multiple (bag)pipe bands
from all over Scotland arrive by ferry to compete in out-piping each
other. Our place is just above the harbour. The ferry accommodates 1000
passengers. It's packed to the gunwhales on Highland Games Day.
The rival bands arrive piping and drumming on the open top deck of the
ferry/. They march off in formation, piping, to the Highland Games
arena which is only at the other end of the (small) village. They
compete, loudly. Then the winners/losers either celebrate or drown their
sorrows with alcohol, so get very drunk. Then all the inebriated pipe
bands from all over Scotland march all the way back to the ferry ALL
PIPING DIFFERENT TUNES. Time for a few more beers and tunes before the
ferry departs
http://youtu.be/JBXyiMEK0bc
Janet :-(
Seen something very similar in Rothesay when on holiday there. The amusing
items was the policeman on push bike, all done up with Police chequered
tape, tleading then procession.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Quinn C
2021-11-30 23:46:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel
of brandy around my neck.
(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
I'm clearly in the minority, but I like the sound of pipes.
As long as they're attached to an organ ...
--
Doris did not usually leave men to port and cigars except
at large,formal dinners because Frank was a man who often
found other men's company gross and tedious.
-- Jane Rule, This Is Not For You, p.93
Ross Clark
2021-12-01 02:39:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1.  Grampian Police Pipe Band
2.  Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3.  Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4.  International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5.  __________Your pick__________
If any of those happened to me, I'd set off into the snow with a barrel
of brandy around my neck.
(Especially the Pipe band, even one set of pipes is too much.)
I'm clearly in the minority, but I like the sound of pipes.
Hey, move over! Me too!

Sam's story reminded me of an end-of-millennium experience.
New Year's Eve 1999, quite a lot of people gathered on Foxton Beach to
watch the last sunset of the 1000's.
As the glowing orb began to sink below the etc., a young woman walked
out and stood in the shallows, facing shoreward, and piped. Unexpected,
unadvertised, but just right.
I asked her afterwards what the piece was -- "Dark Island". Nice choice.
(Apparently a relatively modern composition but now a standard.)
Peter Moylan
2021-11-30 02:05:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
Morris dancers dancing to accordion music.

Still, if I were to be snowed in, there are worse places than a pub to be.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
occam
2021-11-30 10:47:40 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 30 Nov 2021 13:05:45 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
Morris dancers dancing to accordion music.
Lawrence Welk was accordion music without the dancing.

Or this guy could be one of the people trapped in the pub with you. (No
accordion, no dancing, with apologies to Jerry Friedman.)


spains...@gmail.com
2021-11-30 21:20:45 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 29 Nov 2021 19:51:48 -0500
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
I was once on a ferry where 98% of the passengers were teenage girls
attending a cheerleader convention on the Isle of Man. It took 5
hours to get across.
I would have thought most of the men here could have made that last
8 hours.

Bagpipes collect cold wind and discharge it as noise. That contributes
to the English climate as well as Nicola Sturgeon's reputation.
Lewis
2021-12-01 01:41:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
--
'Today Is A Good Day For Someone Else To Die!' --Feet of Clay
Snidely
2021-12-01 01:43:16 UTC
Permalink
Watch this space, where Lewis advised that...
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
That 'G' is uppercase not just because it's item-initial [1], but also
because it's in a toponym.

[1] clearly not sentence-initial

/dps
--
You could try being nicer and politer
Post by Lewis
instead, and see how that works out.
-- Katy Jennison
Tony Cooper
2021-12-01 02:09:36 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 1 Dec 2021 01:41:30 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
It's a real group. The Grampian Police are the territorial police
force for the northeast region of Scotland. Lawrence Welk's first
band was called the Hotsy Totsy Orchestra.

Loading Image...
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-01 18:07:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
It's a real group. The Grampian Police are the territorial police
force for the northeast region of Scotland.
a 'was' needed here nowadays. They became part of Police Scotland in 2013
As an aside, the Grampian Police Pipe Band still exists under that name.
--
Sam Plusnet
Jerry Friedman
2021-12-01 03:44:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
This suggests that you've never been in a room next to one where people
were having a party and played two or three straight hours of rap that sampled
the bass line of "Another One Bites the Dust".
--
Jerry Friedman
Ross Clark
2021-12-01 05:01:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
This suggests that you've never been in a room next to one where people
were having a party and played two or three straight hours of rap that sampled
the bass line of "Another One Bites the Dust".
I was once confined to a hospital bed for a week or so, next door to
someone who had a record player and the single of "Hold On, I'm Comin'",
by Sam & Dave. (This was about the time it hit #1 on the R&B charts.) He
must have played it a couple of hundred times during my stay. I don't
think he even played the B-side. Strangely, it did not turn me against
the song -- I still think it's a classic.
Madhu
2021-12-02 02:06:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lewis
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could
be worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
This suggests that you've never been in a room next to one where
people were having a party and played two or three straight hours of
rap that sampled the bass line of "Another One Bites the Dust".
I was once confined to a hospital bed for a week or so, next door to
someone who had a record player and the single of "Hold On, I'm
Comin'", by Sam & Dave. (This was about the time it hit #1 on the R&B
charts.) He must have played it a couple of hundred times during my
stay. I don't think he even played the B-side. Strangely, it did not
turn me against the song -- I still think it's a classic.
I was able to get at that, and don't believe I'd have survived.

having to listen to 2 hours of /Free Bird/ on loop was enough to
"radicalize" me
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-12-02 20:08:05 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 2 Dec 2021 08:40:07 -0500
[]
Post by Madhu
having to listen to 2 hours of /Free Bird/ on loop was enough to
"radicalize" me

(and no, those are not "all the scenes")
Yup, that's ruined it for me.
Another one that get's me was the regular returning disco-goers
downstairs playing "Disco Inferno" at 2 or 3am.

You can play it at my funeral. Not before.
(c.f Secombe & Milligan's song choice for Sellers' send off).
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-02 21:59:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd, John
On Thu, 2 Dec 2021 08:40:07 -0500
[]
Post by Madhu
having to listen to 2 hours of /Free Bird/ on loop was enough to
"radicalize" me
http://youtu.be/zUi5xKQXG6I
(and no, those are not "all the scenes")
Yup, that's ruined it for me.
Another one that get's me was the regular returning disco-goers
downstairs playing "Disco Inferno" at 2 or 3am.
You can play it at my funeral. Not before.
(c.f Secombe & Milligan's song choice for Sellers' send off).
I thought Sellars pre-selected "In The Mood" for his funeral - knowing
exactly the effect it would have on Secombe & Milligan.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Moylan
2021-12-03 00:57:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
You can play it at my funeral. Not before. (c.f Secombe &
Milligan's song choice for Sellers' send off).
I thought Sellars pre-selected "In The Mood" for his funeral -
knowing exactly the effect it would have on Secombe & Milligan.
Getting slightly away from music: someone I knew specified that guests
at his funeral should dance on his grave while holding a glass of wine.
And that's exactly what happened.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Jerry Friedman
2021-12-02 00:12:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
This suggests that you've never been in a room next to one where people
were having a party and played two or three straight hours of rap that sampled
the bass line of "Another One Bites the Dust".
Sounds a lot better than Lawrence Welk to me. Certainly a better crowd
I'd much rather hang out with.
Well, they were college students, so they were a lot closer to your age at the time
than just about any Lawrence Welk fan.

Even at that age, I disliked hanging out with people when the music was loud
enough to make conversation uncomfortable for me. (I didn't say it was that
loud, but I imagine it doesn't surprise you.) I realize I was in a small minority that
way. As for what those people were like when there wasn't loud music on, I don't
know. Deciding who you'd like to hang out with at non-musical times based on
their musical taste seems a bit odd, but I admit that the idea of wanting to listen
to the same seven-note bass part for a couple hours gives me the creeps.
--
Jerry Friedman
charles
2021-12-01 08:54:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
I don't know what "grampian" is, but I cannot imagine anything could be
worse than Lawrence Welk other than a Lawrence Welk tribute band.
'Grampian' is a region in Scotland - names after a mountain range
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-01 18:01:53 UTC
Permalink
But the Tan Hill Inn would be a great place to be stuck (as long as
they had an adequate stock of Old Peculier)
Anyone who visits the Tan Hill Inn in winter should expect to get snowed in.
--
Sam Plusnet
Sam Plusnet
2021-12-04 01:32:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/inde
x.html
Post by Tony Cooper
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
Newsflash from Denmark: some customers got snowed in at an IKEA,
and had to stay overnight in the showroom beds.
So you can add snoring IKEA customers to your list,
I suppose you could last a long time on meatballs and hotdogs.
--
Sam Plusnet
CDB
2021-12-04 14:01:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were
snowed in for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a
performance by an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/inde
x.html
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
What group would it be your worst nightmare to be snowed in
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
Newsflash from Denmark: some customers got snowed in at an IKEA,
and had to stay overnight in the showroom beds. So you can add
snoring IKEA customers to your list,
I suppose you could last a long time on meatballs and hotdogs.
Don't forget the lingonberries. Fibre and vitamins.
Dingbat
2021-12-04 08:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
You may have seen the news stories about the people who were snowed in
for three nights in a Yorkshire pub after attending a performance by
an Oasis cover band.
https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/tan-hill-inn-storm-arwen-scli-intl-gbr/index.html
It got me thinking about the worst-case scenario for a similar
confinement.
1. Grampian Police Pipe Band
2. Lawrence Welk "Hotsy Totsy" tribute band
3. Appalachian Clogging School Winter Retreat
4. International Mime Training Academy Auditions
5. __________Your pick__________
--
Whochever band it was, they were SNOWED UNDER if they had to play for 3 days.
Loading...