Discussion:
as is the case
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hongy...@gmail.com
2021-04-30 12:02:51 UTC
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The following is an excerpt from <https://www.quword.com/etym/s/a>:

<quote>
a: [OE] The indefinite article in English is ultimately identical with the word one (as is the case, even more obviously, in other European languages – French un, German ein, and so on). The ancestor of both a(n) and one was ān, with a long vowel, but in the Old English period it was chiefly used for the numeral; where we would use a(n), the Anglo-Saxons tended not to use an article at all. Ān begins to emerge as the indefinite article in the middle of the 12th century, and it was not long before, in that relatively unemphatic linguistic environment, its vowel became weakened and shortened, giving an.
</quote>

In the first sentence mentioned above, there is a clause induced by as, i.e., "as is the case". But to be frank, this short little word seems so difficult for me to master all its usage scenarios. Any hints/notes/explanations for the above case will be highly appreciated.

Regards,
HY
s***@my-deja.com
2021-04-30 14:20:51 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
<quote>
a: [OE] The indefinite article in English is ultimately identical with the word one (as is the case, even more obviously, in other European languages – French un, German ein, and so on). The ancestor of both a(n) and one was ān, with a long vowel, but in the Old English period it was chiefly used for the numeral; where we would use a(n), the Anglo-Saxons tended not to use an article at all. Ān begins to emerge as the indefinite article in the middle of the 12th century, and it was not long before, in that relatively unemphatic linguistic environment, its vowel became weakened and shortened, giving an.
</quote>
In the first sentence mentioned above, there is a clause induced by as, i.e., "as is the case". But to be frank, this short little word seems so difficult for me to master all its usage scenarios. Any hints/notes/explanations for the above case will be highly appreciated.
Does it make sense if you substitute "which is also the case" for "as is the case"?
David Kleinecke
2021-05-01 00:42:47 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by ***@gmail.com
<quote>
a: [OE] The indefinite article in English is ultimately identical with the word one (as is the case, even more obviously, in other European languages – French un, German ein, and so on). The ancestor of both a(n) and one was ān, with a long vowel, but in the Old English period it was chiefly used for the numeral; where we would use a(n), the Anglo-Saxons tended not to use an article at all. Ān begins to emerge as the indefinite article in the middle of the 12th century, and it was not long before, in that relatively unemphatic linguistic environment, its vowel became weakened and shortened, giving an.
</quote>
In the first sentence mentioned above, there is a clause induced by as, i.e., "as is the case". But to be frank, this short little word seems so difficult for me to master all its usage scenarios. Any hints/notes/explanations for the above case will be highly appreciated.
Does it make sense if you substitute "which is also the case" for "as is the case"?
There are idioms galore which I will ignore. The underlying use of "a(n)"
in Modern English is what one would expect it to be. Bare English nouns
designate sets - eg: "cat" when (rarely) used without a determiner means
the set of all cats ("Purring is a cat thing to do"). The determiner "a(n)"
makes "a cat" meaning some one member of the set of all cats.
hongy...@gmail.com
2021-05-01 01:29:37 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by ***@gmail.com
<quote>
a: [OE] The indefinite article in English is ultimately identical with the word one (as is the case, even more obviously, in other European languages – French un, German ein, and so on). The ancestor of both a(n) and one was ān, with a long vowel, but in the Old English period it was chiefly used for the numeral; where we would use a(n), the Anglo-Saxons tended not to use an article at all. Ān begins to emerge as the indefinite article in the middle of the 12th century, and it was not long before, in that relatively unemphatic linguistic environment, its vowel became weakened and shortened, giving an.
</quote>
In the first sentence mentioned above, there is a clause induced by as, i.e., "as is the case". But to be frank, this short little word seems so difficult for me to master all its usage scenarios. Any hints/notes/explanations for the above case will be highly appreciated.
Does it make sense if you substitute "which is also the case" for "as is the case"?
There are idioms galore which I will ignore. The underlying use of "a(n)"
in Modern English is what one would expect it to be. Bare English nouns
designate sets - eg: "cat" when (rarely) used without a determiner means
the set of all cats ("Purring is a cat thing to do"). The determiner "a(n)"
makes "a cat" meaning some one member of the set of all cats.
meaning or mean, should be used above?
CDB
2021-05-01 11:45:33 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by ***@gmail.com
The following is an excerpt from
<https://www.quword.com/etym/s/a>: <quote> a: [OE] The
indefinite article in English is ultimately identical with the
word one (as is the case, even more obviously, in other
European languages – French un, German ein, and so on). The
ancestor of both a(n) and one was ān, with a long vowel, but in
the Old English period it was chiefly used for the numeral;
where we would use a(n), the Anglo-Saxons tended not to use an
article at all. Ān begins to emerge as the indefinite article
in the middle of the 12th century, and it was not long before,
in that relatively unemphatic linguistic environment, its vowel
became weakened and shortened, giving an. </quote>
In the first sentence mentioned above, there is a clause
induced by as, i.e., "as is the case". But to be frank, this
short little word seems so difficult for me to master all its
usage scenarios. Any hints/notes/explanations for the above
case will be highly appreciated.
Does it make sense if you substitute "which is also the case" for "as is the case"?
There are idioms galore which I will ignore. The underlying use of
"a(n)" in Modern English is what one would expect it to be. Bare
English nouns designate sets - eg: "cat" when (rarely) used without
a determiner means the set of all cats ("Purring is a cat thing to
do"). The determiner "a(n)" makes "a cat" meaning some one member
of the set of all cats.
meaning or mean, should be used above?
As written, "mean", the verb of which "a cat" is the subject. With a
comma after "cat", "meaning", in which the participle modifies "makes".

I suspect that the lack of a comma was a typo.
Ken Blake
2021-05-01 15:24:32 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
There are idioms galore which I will ignore. The underlying use of "a(n)"
in Modern English is what one would expect it to be. Bare English nouns
designate sets - eg: "cat" when (rarely) used without a determiner means
the set of all cats ("Purring is a cat thing to do"). The determiner "a(n)"
makes "a cat" meaning some one member of the set of all cats.
My wife and I had a cat once. It was a monster and I hated it.

It was bad enough having one cat. I sure wouldn't want to have a set of
them.
--
Ken
hongy...@gmail.com
2021-05-01 01:24:58 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by ***@gmail.com
<quote>
a: [OE] The indefinite article in English is ultimately identical with the word one (as is the case, even more obviously, in other European languages – French un, German ein, and so on). The ancestor of both a(n) and one was ān, with a long vowel, but in the Old English period it was chiefly used for the numeral; where we would use a(n), the Anglo-Saxons tended not to use an article at all. Ān begins to emerge as the indefinite article in the middle of the 12th century, and it was not long before, in that relatively unemphatic linguistic environment, its vowel became weakened and shortened, giving an.
</quote>
In the first sentence mentioned above, there is a clause induced by as, i.e., "as is the case". But to be frank, this short little word seems so difficult for me to master all its usage scenarios. Any hints/notes/explanations for the above case will be highly appreciated.
Does it make sense if you substitute "which is also the case" for "as is the case"?
It seems doesn't.

HY
s***@my-deja.com
2021-05-01 10:27:48 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by ***@gmail.com
<quote>
a: [OE] The indefinite article in English is ultimately identical with the word one (as is the case, even more obviously, in other European languages – French un, German ein, and so on). The ancestor of both a(n) and one was ān, with a long vowel, but in the Old English period it was chiefly used for the numeral; where we would use a(n), the Anglo-Saxons tended not to use an article at all. Ān begins to emerge as the indefinite article in the middle of the 12th century, and it was not long before, in that relatively unemphatic linguistic environment, its vowel became weakened and shortened, giving an.
</quote>
In the first sentence mentioned above, there is a clause induced by as, i.e., "as is the case". But to be frank, this short little word seems so difficult for me to master all its usage scenarios. Any hints/notes/explanations for the above case will be highly appreciated.
Does it make sense if you substitute "which is also the case" for "as is the case"?
It seems doesn't.
Try "the same as is the case in other languages".

Do you have a good English grammar book?
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