Discussion:
A coinage idea occurred to me -- has anyone seen it before?
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Paul Epstein
2021-04-07 08:29:21 UTC
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Suppose an idea or concept is simple but is based on backwards movement.
An example might be a single right-to-left scan of an array in a computer science problem. I thought it would be neat to describe such problems as being "straightbackward" as a play on "straightforward".

Has anyone seen that coinage before? The word "straightbackward" certainly
has google hits, but I'm not sure that any of them are in the above sense.

Thank you,

Paul Epstein
Jack
2021-04-07 12:47:32 UTC
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On Wed, 7 Apr 2021 01:29:21 -0700 (PDT), Paul Epstein
Post by Paul Epstein
Suppose an idea or concept is simple but is based on backwards movement.
An example might be a single right-to-left scan of an array in a computer science problem. I thought it would be neat to describe such problems as being "straightbackward" as a play on "straightforward".
Has anyone seen that coinage before? The word "straightbackward" certainly
has google hits, but I'm not sure that any of them are in the above sense.
It sounds as if it ought to be an antonym of "straightforward", which
in the use you describe,
Lewis
2021-04-07 13:10:14 UTC
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Post by Jack
On Wed, 7 Apr 2021 01:29:21 -0700 (PDT), Paul Epstein
Post by Paul Epstein
Suppose an idea or concept is simple but is based on backwards movement.
An example might be a single right-to-left scan of an array in a computer science problem. I thought it would be neat to describe such problems as being "straightbackward" as a play on "straightforward".
Has anyone seen that coinage before? The word "straightbackward" certainly
has google hits, but I'm not sure that any of them are in the above sense.
I've never heard it, and would use "straightforward" which has nothing
to do with movement or direction, other than maybe metaphorical movement
toward a goal.
Post by Jack
It sounds as if it ought to be an antonym of "straightforward", which
in the use you describe, it isn't at all.
It sounds like someone someone would say to mean, perhaps, something
that seems simple but turns out to achieve the opposite of the intended
results. I certainly would not understand it to mean anything
resembling what Paul intended.
--
Today I was... no, wait, that wasn't me.
CDB
2021-04-07 13:10:54 UTC
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Post by Paul Epstein
Suppose an idea or concept is simple but is based on backwards
movement. An example might be a single right-to-left scan of an array
in a computer science problem. I thought it would be neat to
describe such problems as being "straightbackward" as a play on
"straightforward".
Has anyone seen that coinage before? The word "straightbackward"
certainly has google hits, but I'm not sure that any of them are in
the above sense.
The expression makes me think of kicking against the pricks.
--
Still clasping in his hands of ice that banner with the strange device,
"Inferior!"
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