Discussion:
The hypocrisy of that man
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a***@gmail.com
2018-08-10 07:26:38 UTC
Permalink
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.

2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.

3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.



Are they grammatical?

Are they idiomatic?

Which is correctly punctuated?


I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?


Gratefully,
Navi
Harrison Hill
2018-08-10 07:50:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
They are all fine. As they are exclamations, I'd probably punctuate them:

4) The hypocrisy of that man! To criticize others for what he does
all the time!
Jenny Telia
2018-08-10 08:27:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harrison Hill
4) The hypocrisy of that man! To criticize others for what he does
all the time!
Good touch, the exclamation mark. Now forward it to that two-faced
scoundrel Nigel Farrage. That despicable man apparently still collects a
pension from the EU for his years of obnoxious existence as an MEP. A
true Brexiter.
Janet
2018-08-10 09:54:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Harrison Hill
4) The hypocrisy of that man! To criticize others for what he does
all the time!
Good touch, the exclamation mark. Now forward it to that two-faced
scoundrel Nigel Farrage. That despicable man apparently still collects a
pension from the EU for his years of obnoxious existence as an MEP. A
true Brexiter.
He's still in post as an MEP; the lifetime pension comes after
Brexit.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jan/12/nigel-farage-eu-salary-
docked-claim-misspent-public-funds

"Nigel Farage is being docked half his monthly MEP salary after a
European parliament investigation alleged he had misspent public funds
intended for staffing his office.

The former Ukip leader, who recently bemoaned being ?53, separated and
skint?, will lose €40,000 (£35,500) in total, the Guardian has learned,
after European parliament auditors concluded he had misspent that amount
of EU funds."

"Farage, who has been an MEP for 18 years, has one of the worst
attendance records at the parliament in Brussels and Strasbourg. He is
ranked 748 out of 751 MEPs and has taken part in only 37% of votes in
the current parliamentary session, according to VoteWatch Europe.

The European parliament has played an unsung role in Ukip?s success,
giving the party funding and a platform it struggled to get in British
elections. European parliamentary authorities have in recent years paid
closer attention to how MEPs spend EU funds, after years of assuming
parties would do the right thing.

In 2016 a Ukip-dominated group was denied €501,000 in EU funds after it
emerged European money had been funnelled into the attempts to win
Farage a seat in the 2015 UK general election."



Janet
Peter Moylan
2018-08-10 12:56:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Harrison Hill
They are all fine. As they are exclamations, I'd probably
4) The hypocrisy of that man! To criticize others for what he
does all the time!
Good touch, the exclamation mark. Now forward it to that two-faced
scoundrel Nigel Farrage. That despicable man apparently still
collects a pension from the EU for his years of obnoxious existence
as an MEP. A true Brexiter.
He's still in post as an MEP; the lifetime pension comes after
Brexit.
But will it? I would have assumed that Brexit would automatically cancel
the pension. Even if it doesn't, the EU would be likely to cancel it for
corrupt behaviour.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Cheryl
2018-08-10 13:07:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Harrison Hill
They are all fine. As they are exclamations, I'd probably
4) The hypocrisy of that man! To criticize others for what he
does all the time!
Good touch, the exclamation mark. Now forward it to that two-faced
scoundrel Nigel Farrage. That despicable man apparently still
collects a pension from the EU for his years of obnoxious existence
as an MEP. A true Brexiter.
He's still in post as an MEP; the lifetime pension comes after
Brexit.
But will it? I would have assumed that Brexit would automatically cancel
the pension. Even if it doesn't, the EU would be likely to cancel it for
corrupt behaviour.
I've never understood this bit about cancelling pensions. If you and/or
your employer have contributed to one in your name, surely you should
get it (or amount it contains to date, depending on the terms of the
agreement) when you leave, whether you're fired for cause or your job no
longer exists or you leave as scheduled following a retirement party.
you might get a small lump sum or a tiny pension, if you didn't work
there long, but it's yours, even if you were fired for moral turpitude
or you voted the wrong way on Brexit. It's like your salary. No one gets
to take your salary retroactively, although they can make you pay back
anything you got through fraud. Or they can try, most people arrested
for fraud seem to have lost or hidden all their money.
--
Cheryl
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-10 13:27:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Harrison Hill
They are all fine. As they are exclamations, I'd probably
4) The hypocrisy of that man! To criticize others for what he
does all the time!
Good touch, the exclamation mark. Now forward it to that two-faced
scoundrel Nigel Farrage. That despicable man apparently still
collects a pension from the EU for his years of obnoxious existence
as an MEP. A true Brexiter.
He's still in post as an MEP; the lifetime pension comes after
Brexit.
But will it? I would have assumed that Brexit would automatically cancel
the pension. Even if it doesn't, the EU would be likely to cancel it for
corrupt behaviour.
In this case the EU is simply just another employer. The pension is for time
served and the right to claim it is therefore absolute and protected.
Janet
2018-08-10 16:57:43 UTC
Permalink
In article <pkk22b$ogf$***@dont-email.me>, ***@pmoylan.org.invalid
says...
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Harrison Hill
They are all fine. As they are exclamations, I'd probably
4) The hypocrisy of that man! To criticize others for what he
does all the time!
Good touch, the exclamation mark. Now forward it to that two-faced
scoundrel Nigel Farrage. That despicable man apparently still
collects a pension from the EU for his years of obnoxious existence
as an MEP. A true Brexiter.
He's still in post as an MEP; the lifetime pension comes after
Brexit.
But will it? I would have assumed that Brexit would automatically cancel
the pension.
Would leaving your job early have cancelled pension payable for the
years already worked?

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/27/meps-final-payoff-157000

"The longest-serving MEPs accrue statutory pensions of up to £55,000 ?
70% of their salary. They are entitled to draw this non-contributory
pension, which is funded solely by the taxpayer, at age 63."
Post by Peter Moylan
Even if it doesn't, the EU would be likely to cancel it for
corrupt behaviour.
AIUI the question of MEP pensions (and the pensionable service of
other Brits employed in the EU Parliament) is one of the hot potatoes
for the EU/UK "divorce settlement".

Maybe the MEP pension pot will run dry

https://euobserver.com/institutional/141033

"EU taxpayers risk bailing out the European Parliament due to a €326
million actuarial deficit for an MEP pension scheme."



Janet
Peter Young
2018-08-10 08:13:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Yes.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are they idiomatic?
Not quite.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which is correctly punctuated?
Only 1, to my mind.
Post by a***@gmail.com
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
They do, but I don't think that 2 and 3 would do in writing.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Richard Yates
2018-08-10 13:16:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Yes.
No. The noun phrases in 3) are not sentences. 1) and 2) are
grammatically questionable since neither has a verb (although it could
be argued that "is" is implied).
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-10 14:25:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Yates
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Yes.
No. The noun phrases in 3) are not sentences. 1) and 2) are
grammatically questionable since neither has a verb (although it could
be argued that "is" is implied).
He didn't ask whether they are sentences.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-10 12:25:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
What's the difference among them? People don't "say" punctuation marks.
Janet
2018-08-10 16:26:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
What's the difference among them? People don't "say" punctuation marks.
Not yet comma but give me time comma okay questionmark

Janet
Jerry Friedman
2018-08-10 16:29:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
What's the difference among them? People don't "say" punctuation marks.
Not yet comma but give me time comma okay questionmark
*repeats above in Victor Borge style*
--
Jerry Friedman
Don P
2018-08-10 13:30:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
Taken together, this post illustrates how the OP either (1) does not
know the rules for acceptable writing are nonidentical from those for
acceptable speech, or (2) knowingly mixes the two sets (e.g. asking
about correct, i.e. rule-based, punctuation in speech.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-08-10 17:09:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
Gratefully,
Navi
Yes, people do, so fuck off.
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-08-12 18:40:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
Gratefully,
Navi
Yes, people do, so fuck off.
People do? You mean, get bent over a urinal?
OMG!
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-08-13 19:11:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) The hypocrisy of that man, to criticize others for what he does all the time.
2) The hypocrisy of that man: to criticize others for what he does all the time.
3) The hypocrisy of that man. To criticize others for what he does all the time.
Are they grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
Which is correctly punctuated?
I know that none is a sentence, but people say things like these, don't they?
Gratefully,
Navi
Yes, people do, so fuck off.
People do?  You mean, get bent over a urinal?
OMG!
Stagger Lee's the towel boy at his gay bar.
LOL

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