Discussion:
I don't mind if you don't
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Quinn C
2021-05-02 15:07:05 UTC
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Dialogue from a TV show:

F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.

F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I thought
at first it means "... if you don't do it because you don't have the
time." But that was weird, because the scene was obviously flirty, and
then it occurred to me that she meant "I don't mind if YOU don't."

Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did a bad
delivery (and the director accepted it.)

Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?

(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
--
Mrs. Quinn: Is he alright?
Sister Michael: I wouldn't say so, no. He's a priest, like.
-- Derry Girls, series 1, episode 3
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-02 17:11:30 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I thought
at first it means "... if you don't do it because you don't have the
time." But that was weird, because the scene was obviously flirty, and
then it occurred to me that she meant "I don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did a bad
delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
There's a reason we tell our Chinese friends that CONTEXT IS EVERYTHING.

I infer that at least one of the persons is "female," because of the occurrence
of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing flirtatious about the
dialog as presented.

The stress on "don't" means that F wouldn't be offended if B doesn't show
F everything, or even does any showing-around at all.

The stress on "you" means that F would be ok it B delegated someone else
to do the showing-around.
CDB
2021-05-03 12:18:27 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see? F: Everything. B: Everything? That's
going to take some time. F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I
thought at first it means "... if you don't do it because you
don't have the time." But that was weird, because the scene was
obviously flirty, and then it occurred to me that she meant "I
don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did
a bad delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
There's a reason we tell our Chinese friends that CONTEXT IS
EVERYTHING.
I infer that at least one of the persons is "female," because of the
occurrence of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing
flirtatious about the dialog as presented.
The stress on "don't" means that F wouldn't be offended if B doesn't
show F everything, or even does any showing-around at all.
The stress on "you" means that F would be ok it B delegated someone
else to do the showing-around.
Or "I don't mind if you don't mind" (let's hang out). That is demurely
flirty and seems to me to be the most probable intended meaning. So,
yes, in that case the delivery may have been inept.

ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
Quinn C
2021-05-03 12:49:16 UTC
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Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see? F: Everything. B: Everything? That's
going to take some time. F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I
thought at first it means "... if you don't do it because you
don't have the time." But that was weird, because the scene was
obviously flirty, and then it occurred to me that she meant "I
don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did
a bad delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
There's a reason we tell our Chinese friends that CONTEXT IS
EVERYTHING.
I infer that at least one of the persons is "female," because of the
occurrence of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing
flirtatious about the dialog as presented.
Yes, that's why I provided this additional information, which was
important to my point.

Maybe I should have been clearer: both of the people are obviously
attracted to each other.
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The stress on "don't" means that F wouldn't be offended if B doesn't
show F everything, or even does any showing-around at all.
The stress on "you" means that F would be ok it B delegated someone
else to do the showing-around.
Or "I don't mind if you don't mind" (let's hang out). That is demurely
flirty and seems to me to be the most probable intended meaning. So,
yes, in that case the delivery may have been inept.
Thanks, that's where my mind was going: I don't mind spending more time
(with you) if you don't mind spending the time (with me).
Post by CDB
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-03 14:59:34 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see? F: Everything. B: Everything? That's
going to take some time. F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I
thought at first it means "... if you don't do it because you
don't have the time." But that was weird, because the scene was
obviously flirty, and then it occurred to me that she meant "I
don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did
a bad delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
There's a reason we tell our Chinese friends that CONTEXT IS EVERYTHING.
I infer that at least one of the persons is "female," because of the
occurrence of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing
flirtatious about the dialog as presented.
Yes, that's why I provided this additional information, which was
important to my point.
Maybe I should have been clearer: both of the people are obviously
attracted to each other.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The stress on "don't" means that F wouldn't be offended if B doesn't
show F everything, or even does any showing-around at all.
The stress on "you" means that F would be ok it B delegated someone
else to do the showing-around.
Or "I don't mind if you don't mind" (let's hang out). That is demurely
flirty and seems to me to be the most probable intended meaning. So,
yes, in that case the delivery may have been inept.
Thanks, that's where my mind was going: I don't mind spending more time
(with you) if you don't mind spending the time (with me).
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.

(Which can be determined from the ads shown during it. E.g., the ancient
game shows and sitcoms on the nostalgia networks try to sell me hearing
aids and incontinence supplies and reverse mortgages.
Quinn C
2021-05-03 16:26:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see? F: Everything. B: Everything? That's
going to take some time. F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I
thought at first it means "... if you don't do it because you
don't have the time." But that was weird, because the scene was
obviously flirty, and then it occurred to me that she meant "I
don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did
a bad delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
There's a reason we tell our Chinese friends that CONTEXT IS EVERYTHING.
I infer that at least one of the persons is "female," because of the
occurrence of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing
flirtatious about the dialog as presented.
Yes, that's why I provided this additional information, which was
important to my point.
Maybe I should have been clearer: both of the people are obviously
attracted to each other.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The stress on "don't" means that F wouldn't be offended if B doesn't
show F everything, or even does any showing-around at all.
The stress on "you" means that F would be ok it B delegated someone
else to do the showing-around.
Or "I don't mind if you don't mind" (let's hang out). That is demurely
flirty and seems to me to be the most probable intended meaning. So,
yes, in that case the delivery may have been inept.
Thanks, that's where my mind was going: I don't mind spending more time
(with you) if you don't mind spending the time (with me).
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.
(Which can be determined from the ads shown during it. E.g., the ancient
game shows and sitcoms on the nostalgia networks try to sell me hearing
aids and incontinence supplies and reverse mortgages.
I don't watch them on the TV now, so I won't have this gauge. But like
you, even some of the people involved in bringing the program to screen
(from what I've heard) appear to have overlooked the large female fan
base for Star Trek, starting with TNG. "Adolescent males" often rate it
"too much talk, too little action."

The focus of these shows really is intercultural issues, ethics and such
things. While they're not tackled in enough depth to satisfy a Peter
Moylan, the shows have brought these ideas to a much broader audience
than even very famous SF books.

The B in the above dialog is Benjamin Sisko, loving single father, who
in this interaction finds that he's opening his heart for love for the
first time since the death of his wife four years earlier.
--
I'll call you the next time I pass through your star system.
-- Commander William T. Riker
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-03 17:36:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see? F: Everything. B: Everything? That's
going to take some time. F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I
thought at first it means "... if you don't do it because you
don't have the time." But that was weird, because the scene was
obviously flirty, and then it occurred to me that she meant "I
don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did
a bad delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
There's a reason we tell our Chinese friends that CONTEXT IS EVERYTHING.
I infer that at least one of the persons is "female," because of the
occurrence of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing
flirtatious about the dialog as presented.
Yes, that's why I provided this additional information, which was
important to my point.
Maybe I should have been clearer: both of the people are obviously
attracted to each other.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The stress on "don't" means that F wouldn't be offended if B doesn't
show F everything, or even does any showing-around at all.
The stress on "you" means that F would be ok it B delegated someone
else to do the showing-around.
Or "I don't mind if you don't mind" (let's hang out). That is demurely
flirty and seems to me to be the most probable intended meaning. So,
yes, in that case the delivery may have been inept.
Thanks, that's where my mind was going: I don't mind spending more time
(with you) if you don't mind spending the time (with me).
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.
(Which can be determined from the ads shown during it. E.g., the ancient
game shows and sitcoms on the nostalgia networks try to sell me hearing
aids and incontinence supplies and reverse mortgages.
I don't watch them on the TV now, so I won't have this gauge. But like
you, even some of the people involved in bringing the program to screen
(from what I've heard) appear to have overlooked the large female fan
base for Star Trek, starting with TNG. "Adolescent males" often rate it
"too much talk, too little action."
The focus of these shows really is intercultural issues, ethics and such
things. While they're not tackled in enough depth to satisfy a Peter
Moylan, the shows have brought these ideas to a much broader audience
than even very famous SF books.
Quite famously. If Jack Warner had been alive he would have reminded
Gene Roddenberry, "When I want to send a message, I use Western Union."

Indeed Roddenberry preceded Norman Lear, but his motive in tackling
"social issues" was as explicit and transparent as the later producer's.
I have only ever seen some, possibly most, of the Original episodes and
two of the movies (the first one, and the one where young Kirk cheats),
but it was obvious even to 13-year-old me that Frank Gorshin painted
half black and half white was telling us something about Racism. (And,
of course, the famous Kiss, which I didn't see.)

But who was the main audience for such messages in 1965? Not the
adults who would be offended by an interracial kiss, but the kids who
would hopefully (and in most cases did) grow up to find nothing odd
at all about it.
Post by Quinn C
The B in the above dialog is Benjamin Sisko, loving single father, who
in this interaction finds that he's opening his heart for love for the
first time since the death of his wife four years earlier.
Doubtless that's meaningful to someone who has seen the show.

Meanwhile, on last night's Zoey, Mo came as close as they is likely
ever to to clarifying their gender: "He, she, they, all are fine." Because
in the last few episodes they fell for the fire marshal who inspected
the new restaurant. Who was conflicted because he was recently
divorced from his husband and they have two children. He had a long
speech about how difficult it had been to come out as a gay fireman,
and to go to social events with his husband on his arm, but (this is
S.F., after all) he got over it; and now it's difficult for him to be appearing
in public with someone who has the persona of a woman who usually
calls themself "he." Except in church. (At least all three of them are
black, so there isn't an added complication of race -- a complication
that has in fact been touched on in Zoey's current relationship.)
Quinn C
2021-05-03 21:17:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.
(Which can be determined from the ads shown during it. E.g., the ancient
game shows and sitcoms on the nostalgia networks try to sell me hearing
aids and incontinence supplies and reverse mortgages.
I don't watch them on the TV now, so I won't have this gauge. But like
you, even some of the people involved in bringing the program to screen
(from what I've heard) appear to have overlooked the large female fan
base for Star Trek, starting with TNG. "Adolescent males" often rate it
"too much talk, too little action."
The focus of these shows really is intercultural issues, ethics and such
things. While they're not tackled in enough depth to satisfy a Peter
Moylan, the shows have brought these ideas to a much broader audience
than even very famous SF books.
Quite famously. If Jack Warner had been alive he would have reminded
Gene Roddenberry, "When I want to send a message, I use Western Union."
Indeed Roddenberry preceded Norman Lear, but his motive in tackling
"social issues" was as explicit and transparent as the later producer's.
I have only ever seen some, possibly most, of the Original episodes and
two of the movies (the first one, and the one where young Kirk cheats),
but it was obvious even to 13-year-old me that Frank Gorshin painted
half black and half white was telling us something about Racism. (And,
of course, the famous Kiss, which I didn't see.)
But who was the main audience for such messages in 1965? Not the
adults who would be offended by an interracial kiss, but the kids who
would hopefully (and in most cases did) grow up to find nothing odd
at all about it.
Maybe, but it was a little different in 1993, from which I quoted.

Have you even noticed that we're up to 10 separate series in the Star
Trek universe at this point, with more to come?
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
The B in the above dialog is Benjamin Sisko, loving single father, who
in this interaction finds that he's opening his heart for love for the
first time since the death of his wife four years earlier.
Doubtless that's meaningful to someone who has seen the show.
It was intended to be meaningful to anyone who wanted to know whether
jumping into bed with the next pretty woman would be characteristic for
the character.

But maybe you lost context again very quickly, which seems to happen a
lot these days?
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-03 21:58:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.
(Which can be determined from the ads shown during it. E.g., the ancient
game shows and sitcoms on the nostalgia networks try to sell me hearing
aids and incontinence supplies and reverse mortgages.
I don't watch them on the TV now, so I won't have this gauge. But like
you, even some of the people involved in bringing the program to screen
(from what I've heard) appear to have overlooked the large female fan
base for Star Trek, starting with TNG. "Adolescent males" often rate it
"too much talk, too little action."
The focus of these shows really is intercultural issues, ethics and such
things. While they're not tackled in enough depth to satisfy a Peter
Moylan, the shows have brought these ideas to a much broader audience
than even very famous SF books.
Quite famously. If Jack Warner had been alive he would have reminded
Gene Roddenberry, "When I want to send a message, I use Western Union."
Indeed Roddenberry preceded Norman Lear, but his motive in tackling
"social issues" was as explicit and transparent as the later producer's.
I have only ever seen some, possibly most, of the Original episodes and
two of the movies (the first one, and the one where young Kirk cheats),
but it was obvious even to 13-year-old me that Frank Gorshin painted
half black and half white was telling us something about Racism. (And,
of course, the famous Kiss, which I didn't see.)
But who was the main audience for such messages in 1965? Not the
adults who would be offended by an interracial kiss, but the kids who
would hopefully (and in most cases did) grow up to find nothing odd
at all about it.
Maybe, but it was a little different in 1993, from which I quoted.
Have you even noticed that we're up to 10 separate series in the Star
Trek universe at this point, with more to come?
That many. Imagine that.I know there were Patrick Stewart, Kate
Mulgrew, Wil Wheaton, Brent Spiner, and Lavar Burton. But what
any of them had to do with it? No idea, no interest.
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
The B in the above dialog is Benjamin Sisko, loving single father, who
in this interaction finds that he's opening his heart for love for the
first time since the death of his wife four years earlier.
Doubtless that's meaningful to someone who has seen the show.
It was intended to be meaningful to anyone who wanted to know whether
jumping into bed with the next pretty woman would be characteristic for
the character.
But maybe you lost context again very quickly, which seems to happen a
lot these days?
I really DON'T CARE.
Quinn C
2021-05-03 22:27:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.
[...]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
The B in the above dialog is Benjamin Sisko, loving single father, who
in this interaction finds that he's opening his heart for love for the
first time since the death of his wife four years earlier.
Doubtless that's meaningful to someone who has seen the show.
It was intended to be meaningful to anyone who wanted to know whether
jumping into bed with the next pretty woman would be characteristic for
the character.
But maybe you lost context again very quickly, which seems to happen a
lot these days?
I really DON'T CARE.
"I just want to voice my opinion on the issue, I really don't care for
your opinion". How truly obnoxious.

My fault for feeding the troll, I guess.
--
Mrs. Quinn: Is he alright?
Sister Michael: I wouldn't say so, no. He's a priest, like.
-- Derry Girls, series 1, episode 3
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-04 14:16:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.
[...]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
The B in the above dialog is Benjamin Sisko, loving single father, who
in this interaction finds that he's opening his heart for love for the
first time since the death of his wife four years earlier.
Doubtless that's meaningful to someone who has seen the show.
It was intended to be meaningful to anyone who wanted to know whether
jumping into bed with the next pretty woman would be characteristic for
the character.
But maybe you lost context again very quickly, which seems to happen a
lot these days?
I really DON'T CARE.
"I just want to voice my opinion on the issue, I really don't care for
your opinion". How truly obnoxious.
_I_ have no opinion on whatever you think the issue is. You asked
about the interpretation of an instance of contrastive stress based
on a decontextualized snippet of dialog. I provided that. You chose
to take issue with what I said on the basis of apparent familiarity
with no less than ten avatars of a TV series in which I have no
interest whatsoever. I did not drag Star Trek into the thread.
Post by Quinn C
My fault for feeding the troll, I guess.
If you aren't interested in the Usage of English, don't ask Usage
of English questions in alt.usage.english.
Quinn C
2021-05-05 13:46:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by CDB
ObFlirtiness: I suppose that the line as delivered (DON'T) might mean "I
don't mind if we skip the tour and get right down to knowing each
other", but more context would be required to determine that.
That would've been uncharacteristic for those characters on that show,
after having known each other for a full 10 minutes or so.
But perhaps not uncharacteristic for the adolescent males who are the
principal intended audience of the show.
[...]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
The B in the above dialog is Benjamin Sisko, loving single father, who
in this interaction finds that he's opening his heart for love for the
first time since the death of his wife four years earlier.
Doubtless that's meaningful to someone who has seen the show.
It was intended to be meaningful to anyone who wanted to know whether
jumping into bed with the next pretty woman would be characteristic for
the character.
But maybe you lost context again very quickly, which seems to happen a
lot these days?
I really DON'T CARE.
"I just want to voice my opinion on the issue, I really don't care for
your opinion". How truly obnoxious.
_I_ have no opinion on whatever you think the issue is. You asked
about the interpretation of an instance of contrastive stress based
on a decontextualized snippet of dialog. I provided that. You chose
to take issue with what I said on the basis of apparent familiarity
with no less than ten avatars of a TV series in which I have no
interest whatsoever. I did not drag Star Trek into the thread.
Star Trek wasn't "dragged" into the thread. It was part of the context,
because the question was about a dialogue from a Star Trek series.

YOU suggested additional context in the form of your opinion on the
intended audience of a related, but 30 years older show (i.e. you
dragged Star Trek:TOS into a discussion of Star Trek:DS9).

I didn't think the demographics of the audience was relevant to the
usage question. That was your idea. Fine, but then you didn't want to
actually discuss it, you wanted this sup-point to end on your possibly
wrong and certainly misapplied analysis.

More generally, this is not the first time I observe the attitude "I
know something from 50 years ago, and I will bring it up even though I'm
not interested in updating this knowledge." Perfect "OK, boomer" bait.
--
Nobody's God says hate your neighbor
Even if the neighbor doesn't believe in God
Put aside your religion do your God a favor
-- The Roches, Everyone is Good
S K
2021-05-03 23:30:19 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.
of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing flirtatious about the
dialog as presented.
The conversation effectively has only ONE WORD in it - "sex".

next: clueless interpretation of "come up and see me sometime"
Madhu
2021-05-04 04:56:58 UTC
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Post by S K
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.
For me this can only mean one thing from the script - no matter where
the actors deliver the stress.

"I don't mind if you don't [mind]"

The meaning is obvious.
Post by S K
Post by Peter T. Daniels
of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing flirtatious
about the dialog as presented.
The conversation effectively has only ONE WORD in it - "sex".
next: clueless interpretation of "come up and see me sometime"
raging hormones much?
S K
2021-05-04 11:49:47 UTC
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Post by Madhu
Post by S K
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.
For me this can only mean one thing from the script - no matter where
the actors deliver the stress.
"I don't mind if you don't [mind]"
The meaning is obvious.
Post by S K
Post by Peter T. Daniels
of "she" in your commentary. There is, however, nothing flirtatious
about the dialog as presented.
The conversation effectively has only ONE WORD in it - "sex".
next: clueless interpretation of "come up and see me sometime"
raging hormones much?
wog coming to the defense of the gora.
Madhu
2021-05-04 16:44:35 UTC
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Post by S K
wog coming to the defense of the gora.
now now, skp you know that's a false accusation. i only stated an
opinion which i didn't see stated (in exclusivity) before
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-05-04 17:17:37 UTC
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Post by Madhu
Post by S K
wog coming to the defense of the gora.
now now, skp you know that's a false accusation.
When has Skippy ever worried about trivia like the truth? It's best to
ignore him.
Post by Madhu
i only stated an
opinion which i didn't see stated (in exclusivity) before
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Jerry Friedman
2021-05-04 17:29:37 UTC
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Post by Madhu
Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.
For me this can only mean one thing from the script - no matter where
the actors deliver the stress.
"I don't mind if you don't [mind]"
The meaning is obvious.
...

I agree with Ross that, "I don't mind if you don't [show me around the whole
station]" is also possible. In a flirtatious context, your interpretation seems
more likely, but without watching the scene and maybe earlier episodes, I
can't tell for sure.
--
Jerry Friedman
s***@my-deja.com
2021-05-02 18:23:31 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I thought
at first it means "... if you don't do it because you don't have the
time." But that was weird, because the scene was obviously flirty, and
then it occurred to me that she meant "I don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did a bad
delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
My version:-
"I don't mind if you DON'T"
If it is a problem, you don't have to show all of it.

As this is what you heard, I think it is the most likely explanation.

"I don't mind if YOU don't."
(As you interpreted it) It needn't be you personally



I don't mind if YOU don't".
Ross Clark
2021-05-03 21:32:16 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
F: Does your invitation still stand? To show me around the station?
B: What would you like to see?
F: Everything.
B: Everything? That's going to take some time.
F: I don't mind if you don't.
F said the last sentence like "I don't mind if you DON'T." So I thought
at first it means "... if you don't do it because you don't have the
time." But that was weird, because the scene was obviously flirty, and
then it occurred to me that she meant "I don't mind if YOU don't."
Is the meaning difference I perceive between the two versions with
different emphasis really that clear? Then I'd say the actor did a bad
delivery (and the director accepted it.)
Or was my first interpretation maybe already unlikely for other reasons?
(Star Trek DS9, S02E09)
The meaning difference you perceive is quite clear:

I don't mind if you DON'T [show me everything]
I don't mind if YOU don't [mind]
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