Discussion:
For Jerry
(too old to reply)
Tony Cooper
2019-12-01 06:17:44 UTC
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Perhaps this will inspire you to practice your bird photography:

https://petapixel.com/2019/11/30/rare-and-unusual-birds-photographed-like-humans/?mc_cid=f8022bca18&mc_eid=b307a66a15
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-01 14:21:09 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
https://petapixel.com/2019/11/30/rare-and-unusual-birds-photographed-like-humans/?mc_cid=f8022bca18&mc_eid=b307a66a15
Excellent studio photographs. The text says some of Flach's pictures
were taken in the birds' natural environment, but I doubt any of the
ones at that site were.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2019-12-01 18:13:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 07:21:09 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
https://petapixel.com/2019/11/30/rare-and-unusual-birds-photographed-like-humans/?mc_cid=f8022bca18&mc_eid=b307a66a15
Excellent studio photographs. The text says some of Flach's pictures
were taken in the birds' natural environment, but I doubt any of the
ones at that site were.
Yes, he has the advantage of being able to get some of the subjects in
the studio, but you really can't tell which are done in a studio and
which are done in the natural environment. The solid black or white
background isn't indicative.

He's not a photo-journalist is allowed to use post-processing
techniques to drop out the background. A simple green or blue screen
behind the bird, held by an assistant, can accomplish this.

I don't have an assistant, or the necessary skills, to do what he
does, and I have to shoot at the local zoo for this type of photo:

Loading Image...

I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
as you can see from the white border around the pelican:

Loading Image...
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lewis
2019-12-01 22:14:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-PfDmft6/0/37fd5640/O/2013-02-27-024.jpg
Looks fine to me.
--
When cheese gets its picture taken, what does it say?
Tony Cooper
2019-12-01 23:01:22 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 22:14:49 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-PfDmft6/0/37fd5640/O/2013-02-27-024.jpg
Looks fine to me.
Thank you, but photography groups are very similar to this group. If
I'd post that image in one of those, there would be several people who
would point out the over-sharpened effect. But, I can make a minor
grammar mistake and it would be treated as "looks fine to me".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Adam Funk
2019-12-02 13:59:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 22:14:49 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-PfDmft6/0/37fd5640/O/2013-02-27-024.jpg
Is that the white along the top/left edge of the beak?
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lewis
Looks fine to me.
Thank you, but photography groups are very similar to this group. If
I'd post that image in one of those, there would be several people who
would point out the over-sharpened effect. But, I can make a minor
grammar mistake and it would be treated as "looks fine to me".
Excellent!
--
The human brain, weighing about three pounds, has the computing
power of nearly one billion laptops. The brain has been credited
with notable accomplishments such as the Magna Carta, Special
Relativity, and Hee Haw. [Science Museum of Virginia]
Tony Cooper
2019-12-02 15:24:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 22:14:49 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-PfDmft6/0/37fd5640/O/2013-02-27-024.jpg
Is that the white along the top/left edge of the beak?
Yes, it's called a "halo effect". Very pronounced in this image at
the top of the beak, on the wing, and on the abdomen. (Do birds have
an abdomen?)
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lewis
Looks fine to me.
Thank you, but photography groups are very similar to this group. If
I'd post that image in one of those, there would be several people who
would point out the over-sharpened effect. But, I can make a minor
grammar mistake and it would be treated as "looks fine to me".
Excellent!
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-03 14:28:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 22:14:49 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-PfDmft6/0/37fd5640/O/2013-02-27-024.jpg
Is that the white along the top/left edge of the beak?
Yes, it's called a "halo effect". Very pronounced in this image at
the top of the beak, on the wing, and on the abdomen. (Do birds have
an abdomen?)
...

Yes, also called the belly.
--
Jerry Friedman
Lewis
2019-12-03 12:12:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 22:14:49 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Tony Cooper
I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-PfDmft6/0/37fd5640/O/2013-02-27-024.jpg
Is that the white along the top/left edge of the beak?
I think it makes the image of the bid pop from the background and gives an
overall 3D sort of effect to the picture.

But then again, many professional photographers (or often worse,
amateurs with aspirations) have curious ideas about photography.
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Lewis
Looks fine to me.
Thank you, but photography groups are very similar to this group. If
I'd post that image in one of those, there would be several people who
would point out the over-sharpened effect. But, I can make a minor
grammar mistake and it would be treated as "looks fine to me".
Excellent!
--
You only had to look into Teatime's mismatched eyes to know one
thing, which was this: if Teatime wanted to find you he would not
look everywhere. He'd look in only one place, which would be the
place where you were hiding. --Hogfather
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-01 23:54:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 07:21:09 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
https://petapixel.com/2019/11/30/rare-and-unusual-birds-photographed-like-humans/?mc_cid=f8022bca18&mc_eid=b307a66a15
Excellent studio photographs. The text says some of Flach's pictures
were taken in the birds' natural environment, but I doubt any of the
ones at that site were.
Yes, he has the advantage of being able to get some of the subjects in
the studio, but you really can't tell which are done in a studio and
which are done in the natural environment. The solid black or white
background isn't indicative.
He's not a photo-journalist is allowed to use post-processing
techniques to drop out the background. A simple green or blue screen
behind the bird, held by an assistant, can accomplish this.
That sounds like quite a good trick if the bird is wild. I suspect that
if any of those were taken in the wild, he used more conventional
post-processing to get the solid backgrounds.
Post by Tony Cooper
I don't have an assistant, or the necessary skills, to do what he
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-NNJHbpw/0/7ed76a42/O/2008-12-27-6.jpg
Very nice as usual.
Post by Tony Cooper
I sometimes make mistakes in post, too. This one was over-sharpened
https://photos.smugmug.com/Birds/i-PfDmft6/0/37fd5640/O/2013-02-27-024.jpg
But you could redo it without the oversharpening if you wanted.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2019-12-02 01:24:49 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 16:54:50 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 1 Dec 2019 07:21:09 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
https://petapixel.com/2019/11/30/rare-and-unusual-birds-photographed-like-humans/?mc_cid=f8022bca18&mc_eid=b307a66a15
Excellent studio photographs. The text says some of Flach's pictures
were taken in the birds' natural environment, but I doubt any of the
ones at that site were.
Yes, he has the advantage of being able to get some of the subjects in
the studio, but you really can't tell which are done in a studio and
which are done in the natural environment. The solid black or white
background isn't indicative.
He's not a photo-journalist is allowed to use post-processing
techniques to drop out the background. A simple green or blue screen
behind the bird, held by an assistant, can accomplish this.
That sounds like quite a good trick if the bird is wild. I suspect that
if any of those were taken in the wild, he used more conventional
post-processing to get the solid backgrounds.
If the bird is up in a tree or otherwise placed where it's impossible
to get the screen behind the subject, other conventional methods would
be followed. If he's shooting in a zoo, he can use the green screen.

Green (or blue) screen *is* a conventional process. In Photoshop,
there are several ways to cut out the subject, invert, delete the
background, and then add a solid background by adding a new layer
under the subject layer.

None, though, work as well as the green screen system, so having that
in one's toolbag has become conventional for those who want that
output. The color of the screen need not be green or blue, but it
needs to be some color not in the subject. The software finds all of
a designated color and removes it.

The "screen", in this context, is a piece of material held or fastened
behind the subject. You can't use a green bedsheet because the
wrinkles will be in shadow and you don't have a uniform surface of
green. I've used poster board for this several times.

I put this water lily on a piece of green poster board and then
dropped out the background and added a black background over a white
background and then did a vignette on the black layer.

Loading Image...
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
s***@gmail.com
2019-12-02 07:13:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
https://petapixel.com/2019/11/30/rare-and-unusual-birds-photographed-like-humans/?mc_cid=f8022bca18&mc_eid=b307a66a15
Excellent studio photographs. The text says some of Flach's pictures
were taken in the birds' natural environment, but I doubt any of the
ones at that site were.
From the artist's own website, it appears he ran into a glass ceiling.

/dps
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