Discussion:
shrimp on the barbie ??
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bruce bowser
2021-04-23 16:02:58 UTC
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hello,
i'm looking for a recipe for something close to outback's
shrimp on the barbie. i'd prefer to do this with
pre-cooked
shrimp and just do a lil warming action on the grill, if
possible.
i've heard that you marinate them in bloody mary mix. i
also figure i'd have to wipe them with a bit of garlic
butter too.
any help would be appreciated... by the way, this is my
first post to this group! guess i should introduce
myself,
eh? my name is michael robison and i live in southern
indiana.
thank you, miker
Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.
I've never been to an outback restaurant, but I grill my
shrimp with a rub made of ground ancho and chipotle, garlic,
thyme, oregano and mixed with enough olive oil to make a
loose paste. Stir the shrimp in this and place on the
grill.
variation: use ground cayenne instead of chipotle, add some
allspice, add onion, add lime jiuce, whatever.
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-24 01:39:18 UTC
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Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.

But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Tony Cooper
2021-04-24 03:32:16 UTC
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On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.



And more on this:

https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/


You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-24 03:38:53 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
Said ad was aimed at Americans, MAY have been the coinage, and was
likely PITCHED in the first place by Americans. I suspect that Peter
saying that "a barbecue was more likely to be a 'cue' than a 'barbie'
before 1980 should probably be listened to on this since HE ACTUALLY IS
AUSTRALIAN.

I *am* moderately curious why they didn't insist on switching "shrimp",
a word that NEVER applied to anything bigger than "twice the size of a
scampi" in AusE, for "prawn", especially if a "barbie" HAD been a
barbecue before the pitch meeting.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Tony Cooper
2021-04-24 04:38:58 UTC
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Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
Said ad was aimed at Americans, MAY have been the coinage, and was
likely PITCHED in the first place by Americans. I suspect that Peter
saying that "a barbecue was more likely to be a 'cue' than a 'barbie'
before 1980 should probably be listened to on this since HE ACTUALLY IS
AUSTRALIAN.
Thank you for using ALL CAPS. Without that emphasis, I might have
been in doubt about Peter's nationality.
Post by Chrysi Cat
I *am* moderately curious why they didn't insist on switching "shrimp",
a word that NEVER applied to anything bigger than "twice the size of a
scampi" in AusE, for "prawn", especially if a "barbie" HAD been a
barbecue before the pitch meeting.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Peter Moylan
2021-04-24 06:01:30 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an
extra shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
Yes, that's pretty much what I said. Although the ads apparently did
well in America, it was criticised here for its mangling of the
language. "Oh, that's just Hogues trying to speak American."
Post by Tony Cooper
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
where the disowning can even be seen in the URL.

For the record, I should say that "barbie" can be found in Australian
slang, especially in the ocker variety spoken by people like Paul Hogan.
But it's not all that common, and not very typically Australian. Those
ads lied to you.

"Shrimp" does exist in AusE, but it doesn't refer to those prawns in the
ads. And we don't used the word much (except in the metaphorical sense
of "very small") because you can't buy shrimp in this country, or at
least they're very difficult to find.

That second URL you gave also mentions the ad campaign "Where the bloody
hell are you?" That, I believe, was the idea of our own Prime Minister,
back when he wasn't a politician but just a failed marketing person. The
question came back to haunt him when he went off for a holiday in Hawaii
while the country was burning down around our ears.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Graham
2021-04-24 17:56:13 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an
extra shrimp on the barbie".  Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
Yes, that's pretty much what I said. Although the ads apparently did
well in America, it was criticised here for its mangling of the
language. "Oh, that's just Hogues trying to speak American."
Post by Tony Cooper
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
where the disowning can even be seen in the URL.
For the record, I should say that "barbie" can be found in Australian
slang, especially in the ocker variety spoken by people like Paul Hogan.
But it's not all that common, and not very typically Australian. Those
ads lied to you.
But similar contractions abound in Australian slang. I remember hearing
"kero" and "compo" and more that will probably occur to me after I post
this.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-24 18:39:05 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an
extra shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
Yes, that's pretty much what I said. Although the ads apparently did
well in America, it was criticised here for its mangling of the
language. "Oh, that's just Hogues trying to speak American."
Post by Tony Cooper
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
where the disowning can even be seen in the URL.
For the record, I should say that "barbie" can be found in Australian
slang, especially in the ocker variety spoken by people like Paul Hogan.
But it's not all that common, and not very typically Australian. Those
ads lied to you.
But similar contractions abound in Australian slang. I remember hearing
"kero" and "compo" and more that will probably occur to me after I post
this.
That's what makes "barbie" suspect. The Aussie contraction usually
replaces the part of the word that would tell the naive hearer what it
was supposed to be is usually replaced with -o, hence "prawn on the barbo."
Graham
2021-04-24 19:43:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Graham
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an
extra shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
Yes, that's pretty much what I said. Although the ads apparently did
well in America, it was criticised here for its mangling of the
language. "Oh, that's just Hogues trying to speak American."
Post by Tony Cooper
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
where the disowning can even be seen in the URL.
For the record, I should say that "barbie" can be found in Australian
slang, especially in the ocker variety spoken by people like Paul Hogan.
But it's not all that common, and not very typically Australian. Those
ads lied to you.
But similar contractions abound in Australian slang. I remember hearing
"kero" and "compo" and more that will probably occur to me after I post
this.
That's what makes "barbie" suspect. The Aussie contraction usually
replaces the part of the word that would tell the naive hearer what it
was supposed to be is usually replaced with -o, hence "prawn on the barbo."
Not necessarily. I heard "lackie band" for elastic band.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-24 20:16:53 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Graham
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an
extra shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
Yes, that's pretty much what I said. Although the ads apparently did
well in America, it was criticised here for its mangling of the
language. "Oh, that's just Hogues trying to speak American."
Post by Tony Cooper
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
where the disowning can even be seen in the URL.
For the record, I should say that "barbie" can be found in Australian
slang, especially in the ocker variety spoken by people like Paul Hogan.
But it's not all that common, and not very typically Australian. Those
ads lied to you.
But similar contractions abound in Australian slang. I remember hearing
"kero" and "compo" and more that will probably occur to me after I post
this.
That's what makes "barbie" suspect. The Aussie contraction usually
replaces the part of the word that would tell the naive hearer what it
was supposed to be is usually replaced with -o, hence "prawn on the barbo."
Not necessarily. I heard "lackie band" for elastic band.
That's the meaning of "usually."

I doubt I would understand "lackie band" unless you were holding one
or talking about what you were going to do with it. We say "rubber band,"
whatever it's made of. An "elastic bandage," also known by the brand
name "Ace bandage," is a long wide strip of stretchy cloth that's used for
closely binding sprains (typically sprained ankles).
Peter Moylan
2021-04-24 23:44:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Graham
Post by Peter Moylan
For the record, I should say that "barbie" can be found in
Australian slang, especially in the ocker variety spoken by people
like Paul Hogan. But it's not all that common, and not very
typically Australian. Those ads lied to you.
But similar contractions abound in Australian slang. I remember
hearing "kero" and "compo" and more that will probably occur to me
after I post this.
Oh, certainly, and "barbie" is used here by some people. But the Hogan
sequence comes across to me, and other Australians, as clumsy parody.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
occam
2021-04-24 09:35:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
More likely, it was the (American) marketing men who shot Australians in
the back.
Lewis
2021-04-24 17:30:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
More likely, it was the (American) marketing men who shot Australians in
the back.
Perhaps, but it was an Australian who said those lines.
--
Puny god!
Tony Cooper
2021-04-24 18:49:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 17:30:00 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by occam
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
More likely, it was the (American) marketing men who shot Australians in
the back.
Perhaps, but it was an Australian who said those lines.
Most ads are prepared by advertising agencies. Whether or not the
Australian Tourist Board used an American or Australian ad agency is
unknown, but the ATB did approve the ad.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-26 19:46:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by occam
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
More likely, it was the (American) marketing men who shot Australians in
the back.
Perhaps, but it was an Australian who said those lines.
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Lewis
2021-04-27 06:26:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
Post by occam
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 24 Apr 2021 12:39:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
The Australian Tourist Board, in 1984, had an ad with Paul Hogan
saying "Fire up the barbie" and one where he says he'll "slip an extra
shrimp on the barbie". Here's one of them.
http://youtu.be/Xn_CPrCS8gs
https://theculturetrip.com/pacific/australia/articles/why-australians-disown-the-phrase-put-another-shrimp-on-the-barbie/
You shot yourselves in the foot, mate.
More likely, it was the (American) marketing men who shot Australians in
the back.
Perhaps, but it was an Australian who said those lines.
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
--
And what group was that, Gail? The Menstrual Cycles.
occam
2021-04-27 11:04:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Lewis
2021-04-27 11:28:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
There is a difference, but you are obviously uninterested.
--
Generalizations are always inaccurate.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-27 11:21:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but
don't read too much into that because Welsh & British people
still call them broad beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play
a role as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be
"famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
There is a difference, but you are obviously uninterested.
In some ways Hogan had a more difficult job, having to use
non-Australian language and making it sound Australian.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-27 19:42:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
There is a difference, but you are obviously uninterested.
They were both actors delivering lines written by others.
The art of the actor is to give a convincing performance and both succeeded.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-27 13:00:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Your Razor must be out of order.

The key here isn't the nationality of the ACTOR but the nationality of
the CHARACTER. In no continuity is Hannibal Lecter supposed to be any
form of BrE speaker, so of course he'll say "fava beans". That the
producers got an Englishman to do it is completely irrelevant, except
inasmuch as some dialect coach was able to teach Hopkins to sound American.

Hogan's character was either supposed to be a [stereo]typical Aussie
bloke or "Paul Hogan, Crocodile Dundee himself". Either way, the
character was NOT supposed to be American and the only amazing thing is
that the actor didn't take offense to the Americanisms and refuse to cut
the ad.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Lewis
2021-04-27 13:49:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Your Razor must be out of order.
The key here isn't the nationality of the ACTOR but the nationality of
the CHARACTER. In no continuity is Hannibal Lecter supposed to be any
form of BrE speaker, so of course he'll say "fava beans". That the
producers got an Englishman to do it is completely irrelevant, except
inasmuch as some dialect coach was able to teach Hopkins to sound American.
Hogan's character was either supposed to be a [stereo]typical Aussie
bloke or "Paul Hogan, Crocodile Dundee himself". Either way, the
character was NOT supposed to be American and the only amazing thing is
that the actor didn't take offense to the Americanisms and refuse to cut
the ad.
And, the fact is that barbie *was* used in Australia to mean a BBQ grill.
--
Amazingly Beautiful Creatures Dancing Excites the Forest Glade, in my
Heart how I do Jump like the Kudo Listen to the Music so Nice the
Organ Plays. Quietly Rests the Sleepy Tiger Under the Vine tree
at the Water's side and X marks the spot 'neath the Yellow moon
where the Zulu king and I did hide.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-27 15:06:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
I was shocked when Hugh Laurie did his first interview on Letterman after
*House* had been running a while. (Hadn't heard of *Jeeves and Wooster*,
and by the time I got around to it, saw that that had been for good reason.)
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lewis
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Your Razor must be out of order.
?
Post by Chrysi Cat
The key here isn't the nationality of the ACTOR but the nationality of
the CHARACTER. In no continuity is Hannibal Lecter supposed to be any
form of BrE speaker, so of course he'll say "fava beans". That the
producers got an Englishman to do it is completely irrelevant, except
inasmuch as some dialect coach was able to teach Hopkins to sound American.
Hogan's character was either supposed to be a [stereo]typical Aussie
bloke or "Paul Hogan, Crocodile Dundee himself". Either way, the
character was NOT supposed to be American and the only amazing thing is
that the actor didn't take offense to the Americanisms and refuse to cut
the ad.
Um ... he knew who was paying his salary.
charles
2021-04-27 16:57:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't
read too much into that because Welsh & British people still call
them broad beans.
I was shocked when Hugh Laurie did his first interview on Letterman after
*House* had been running a while. (Hadn't heard of *Jeeves and Wooster*,
and by the time I got around to it, saw that that had been for good reason.)
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lewis
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a
role as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous
Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Your Razor must be out of order.
?
Post by Chrysi Cat
The key here isn't the nationality of the ACTOR but the nationality of
the CHARACTER. In no continuity is Hannibal Lecter supposed to be any
form of BrE speaker, so of course he'll say "fava beans". That the
producers got an Englishman to do it is completely irrelevant, except
inasmuch as some dialect coach was able to teach Hopkins to sound American.
Hogan's character was either supposed to be a [stereo]typical Aussie
bloke or "Paul Hogan, Crocodile Dundee himself". Either way, the
character was NOT supposed to be American and the only amazing thing is
that the actor didn't take offense to the Americanisms and refuse to
cut the ad.
Um ... he knew who was paying his salary.
A story from the 1960s at BBC TV studios; Actor (who thought highly of
himself): "What is my motivation for playing it that way?"

Director: "Your pay cheque, dearie."
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-27 19:44:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't
read too much into that because Welsh & British people still call
them broad beans.
I was shocked when Hugh Laurie did his first interview on Letterman after
*House* had been running a while. (Hadn't heard of *Jeeves and Wooster*,
and by the time I got around to it, saw that that had been for good reason.)
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lewis
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a
role as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous
Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Your Razor must be out of order.
?
Post by Chrysi Cat
The key here isn't the nationality of the ACTOR but the nationality of
the CHARACTER. In no continuity is Hannibal Lecter supposed to be any
form of BrE speaker, so of course he'll say "fava beans". That the
producers got an Englishman to do it is completely irrelevant, except
inasmuch as some dialect coach was able to teach Hopkins to sound American.
Hogan's character was either supposed to be a [stereo]typical Aussie
bloke or "Paul Hogan, Crocodile Dundee himself". Either way, the
character was NOT supposed to be American and the only amazing thing is
that the actor didn't take offense to the Americanisms and refuse to
cut the ad.
Um ... he knew who was paying his salary.
A story from the 1960s at BBC TV studios; Actor (who thought highly of
himself): "What is my motivation for playing it that way?"
Director: "Your pay cheque, dearie."
BBC tartan: small cheques.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Kerr-Mudd, John
2021-04-28 10:21:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 07:00:04 -0600
Chrysi Cat <***@gmail.com> wrote:

[Paul Hogan Barbie]
Post by Chrysi Cat
Hogan's character was either supposed to be a [stereo]typical Aussie
bloke or "Paul Hogan, Crocodile Dundee himself". Either way, the
The actual Crocodile Dundee got nothing for this story:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rod_Ansell
Post by Chrysi Cat
character was NOT supposed to be American and the only amazing thing is
that the actor didn't take offense to the Americanisms and refuse to cut
the ad.
--
Bah, and indeed Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-27 15:02:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Hopkins was interviewed on Colbert a few days before the Oscars. Maybe
because the connection was quite poor, he didn't sound regional at all.
But in yesterday's message thanking the Academy, he sounded very Welsh
indeed.

(No idea what Hogan sounded like out of character.)
bruce bowser
2021-04-27 19:24:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but don't read
too much into that because Welsh & British people still call them broad
beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play a role
as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be "famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Hopkins was interviewed on Colbert a few days before the Oscars. Maybe
because the connection was quite poor, he didn't sound regional at all.
But in yesterday's message thanking the Academy, he sounded very Welsh
indeed.
Here in the states, the only one that the media says who sounded Welsh were actors who played Henry V, like RIchard Burton. Who drank himself to death in Céligny, Switzerland in 1984.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-28 01:20:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Lewis
Post by Sam Plusnet
Anthony Hopkins delivered a line about some fava beans, but
don't read too much into that because Welsh & British people
still call them broad beans.
There is a big difference between hiring Anthony Hopkins to play
a role as an American character and hiring Paul Hogan to be
"famous Australian"
Really? What would that 'big difference' be? (The question is
rhetorical - there is no difference. They are both hired actors,
delivering lines.)
Hopkins was interviewed on Colbert a few days before the Oscars.
Maybe because the connection was quite poor, he didn't sound
regional at all. But in yesterday's message thanking the Academy, he
sounded very Welsh indeed.
(No idea what Hogan sounded like out of character.)
His on-screen accent is about the same as his natural accent, as far as
I know.

Before he became a comedian he was a painter on the Sydney Harbour
Bridge. That's a job with good job security, because by the time you
reach one end of the bridge the other end needs re-doing. But it's not a
job that attracts intellectuals, so Hogan would have naturally had the
accent that I think of as "uneducated urban". Not quite as broad as
rural Australian, but headed in that direction. Sometimes we call that
accent "ocker".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Ross Clark
2021-04-24 06:55:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan campaign,
though not by much. From the _Australian_, 14/8/1976:

He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.

(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
Madhu
2021-04-25 08:39:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...

chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.

"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-25 09:25:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.

It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter Moylan
2021-04-25 08:43:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
phil
2021-04-25 09:56:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder.  verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
    "I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
    as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
    cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
The explanation I remember (citation lost in the mists of the past) is
that it derives from 'watch under!'.

"When I'd swallowed the last prawn, I had a technicolour yawn,
And I chundered in the old Pacific Sea."
Jerry Friedman
2021-04-25 14:13:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by phil
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
The explanation I remember (citation lost in the mists of the past) is
that it derives from 'watch under!'.
"When I'd swallowed the last prawn, I had a technicolour yawn,
And I chundered in the old Pacific Sea."
Green credits the "watch under" explanation to Barry Humphries. He also
quotes Humphries's other explanation: that it came from the character
"Chunder Loo from Akim Foo" in a series of cartoon ads for boot polish.
The name would have become rhyming slang for "spew".

https://greensdictofslang.com/entry/jfgfaqa

World Wide Words prefers the Chunder Loo story, since there's no evidence
of "Watch under!"

https://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-chu1.htm
--
Jerry Friedman
Madhu
2021-04-25 09:59:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing
as a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for
origins other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
It's come up (haha) before many times here of course. I had these in my
local cache:
http://al.howardknight.net/?STYPE=msgid&A=O&MSGI=%***@ProMini.lan%3E
http://al.howardknight.net/?STYPE=msgid&A=O&MSGI=%3Cq2pjpi$8lm$***@dont-email.me%3E

[There was another reason I had at the time I made the post today, but
I've forgotten what it was.]
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2021-04-25 15:43:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 25 Apr 2021 19:43:58 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
Reasonable.

Do you have the term "thunder(-)box" in Australian English?
OED:
thunder-box n. slang a portable commode; by extension,
any lavatory.

and:
https://www.lexico.com/definition/thunderbox

I have wondered whether "chunder" might be an abbreviation of "chuck
into a thunderbox"
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Ross Clark
2021-04-25 22:22:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 25 Apr 2021 19:43:58 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
Reasonable.
Do you have the term "thunder(-)box" in Australian English?
thunder-box n. slang a portable commode; by extension,
any lavatory.
https://www.lexico.com/definition/thunderbox
That word inevitably brings to mind Major Bloodnok - a virtuoso on the
device.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have wondered whether "chunder" might be an abbreviation of "chuck
into a thunderbox"
Mh...

"Chunder" is actually attested slightly earlier (1950, in Neville
Shute's "A Town Like Alice"). "Chuck" appears (in Australia) from 1957.
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-04-26 07:00:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 25 Apr 2021 19:43:58 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
Reasonable.
Do you have the term "thunder(-)box" in Australian English?
thunder-box n. slang a portable commode; by extension,
any lavatory.
https://www.lexico.com/definition/thunderbox
That word inevitably brings to mind Major Bloodnok - a virtuoso on the device.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have wondered whether "chunder" might be an abbreviation of "chuck
into a thunderbox"
Mh...
"Chunder" is actually attested slightly earlier (1950, in Neville
Shute's "A Town Like Alice").
Though note that Nevil Shute was English (he went to the same school as
I did), and only moved to Australia for the last ten years of his life.
"Chuck" appears (in Australia) from 1957.
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit"
since ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-26 16:04:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
Ross Clark
2021-04-26 21:28:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
Well, "chuck (up)" is what I was referring to:

1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-26 21:56:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American. The participle might be "puking" here.
Ross Clark
2021-04-26 23:38:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American.
Um, we were actually talking about AusE here. But 1977 is American.
And FWIW Chapman (Dict Am Slang, 1988) has "chuck 'to vomit' [= upchuck]".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The participle might be "puking" here.
??
Mack A. Damia
2021-04-27 00:21:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American.
Um, we were actually talking about AusE here. But 1977 is American.
And FWIW Chapman (Dict Am Slang, 1988) has "chuck 'to vomit' [= upchuck]".
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The participle might be "puking" here.
??
Is that you, Ralph?
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-27 14:58:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American.
Um, we were actually talking about AusE here. But 1977 is American.
And FWIW Chapman (Dict Am Slang, 1988) has "chuck 'to vomit' [= upchuck]".
Yes, well, he used to be WBEZ (Chicago) 's occasional commentator on
language issues, and didn't inspire great confidence in his observational
abilities.
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The participle might be "puking" here.
??
Sigh. If you substitute "puking" for "chucking," you get good informal,
somewhat indelicate American English. You can add "up" if a specific
egested component is then mentioned. ("Egest" is a favorite crossword
puzzle word.)
Ross Clark
2021-04-27 22:46:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American.
The last four are all British.
Post by Ross Clark
Um, we were actually talking about AusE here. But 1977 is American.
Post by Ross Clark
And FWIW Chapman (Dict Am Slang, 1988) has "chuck 'to vomit' [= upchuck]".
Yes, well, he used to be WBEZ (Chicago) 's occasional commentator on
language issues, and didn't inspire great confidence in his observational
abilities.
Chapman 1988 is largely based on Wentworth & Flexner 1960. They say the
same thing. No doubt you'll be able to find a reason to dismiss them too.
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The participle might be "puking" here.
??
Sigh. If you substitute "puking" for "chucking," you get good informal,
somewhat indelicate American English. You can add "up" if a specific
egested component is then mentioned. ("Egest" is a favorite crossword
puzzle word.)
So if they had used a different word, you wouldn't have objected? Duh.
(Still unclear why you would mention just the participle.)

Oh, here's another AmE example or two:

J . Kerouac , On the Road , 271 : « She drank beyond all bounds . She
threw down drinks when it seemed she was about to chuck up the last .

What if I have a queasy stomach? They say a good half of the men who
have been in orbit have chucked up or gotten dizzy or something.
(John Berryman, The Trouble with Telstar, Analog, 1963)

He ' d have to hug his stomach and clamp his mouth shut to keep from
chucking up.... (Daniel Vilmure, Life in the Land of the Living, 1987)
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-28 14:30:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American.
The last four are all British.
Post by Ross Clark
Um, we were actually talking about AusE here. But 1977 is American.
Post by Ross Clark
And FWIW Chapman (Dict Am Slang, 1988) has "chuck 'to vomit' [= upchuck]".
Yes, well, he used to be WBEZ (Chicago) 's occasional commentator on
language issues, and didn't inspire great confidence in his observational
abilities.
Chapman 1988 is largely based on Wentworth & Flexner 1960. They say the
same thing. No doubt you'll be able to find a reason to dismiss them too.
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The participle might be "puking" here.
??
Sigh. If you substitute "puking" for "chucking," you get good informal,
somewhat indelicate American English. You can add "up" if a specific
egested component is then mentioned. ("Egest" is a favorite crossword
puzzle word.)
So if they had used a different word, you wouldn't have objected? Duh.
(Still unclear why you would mention just the participle.)
Because it's the most usual form found. How often does one say
"Johnny upchucked all over Granny's shoulder"?
Post by Ross Clark
J . Kerouac , On the Road , 271 : « She drank beyond all bounds . She
threw down drinks when it seemed she was about to chuck up the last .
What if I have a queasy stomach? They say a good half of the men who
have been in orbit have chucked up or gotten dizzy or something.
(John Berryman, The Trouble with Telstar, Analog, 1963)
He ' d have to hug his stomach and clamp his mouth shut to keep from
chucking up.... (Daniel Vilmure, Life in the Land of the Living, 1987)
Ross Clark
2021-04-28 21:48:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American.
The last four are all British.
Post by Ross Clark
Um, we were actually talking about AusE here. But 1977 is American.
Post by Ross Clark
And FWIW Chapman (Dict Am Slang, 1988) has "chuck 'to vomit' [= upchuck]".
Yes, well, he used to be WBEZ (Chicago) 's occasional commentator on
language issues, and didn't inspire great confidence in his observational
abilities.
Chapman 1988 is largely based on Wentworth & Flexner 1960. They say the
same thing. No doubt you'll be able to find a reason to dismiss them too.
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The participle might be "puking" here.
??
Sigh. If you substitute "puking" for "chucking," you get good informal,
somewhat indelicate American English. You can add "up" if a specific
egested component is then mentioned. ("Egest" is a favorite crossword
puzzle word.)
So if they had used a different word, you wouldn't have objected? Duh.
(Still unclear why you would mention just the participle.)
Because it's the most usual form found.
A surprising generalization, given that only three of the seven examples
above have the V-ing form.

How often does one say
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Johnny upchucked all over Granny's shoulder"?
As often as necessary.
1953 L. Uris Battle Cry (1964) 365: The wicked-looking Marines […]
upchucked into the ocean.
1989 C. Hiaasen Skin Tight 176: Maggie Gonzalez upchucked gloriously all
over Chemo's gun arm.

Those from Green's quotations s.v. "upchuck", which
also include:
V (base form): 4
V-ing: 1
V-s: 1
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
J . Kerouac , On the Road , 271 : « She drank beyond all bounds . She
threw down drinks when it seemed she was about to chuck up the last .
What if I have a queasy stomach? They say a good half of the men who
have been in orbit have chucked up or gotten dizzy or something.
(John Berryman, The Trouble with Telstar, Analog, 1963)
He ' d have to hug his stomach and clamp his mouth shut to keep from
chucking up.... (Daniel Vilmure, Life in the Land of the Living, 1987)
Adam Funk
2021-04-29 08:02:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
1957 D. Niland Call Me When the Cross Turns Over (1958) 52: Don't try
the Barcoo spews […] Get a feed into you, and then you want to chuck it
up again.
1967 ‘Whisper All Aussie Dict.’ in Kings Cross Whisper (Sydney) xxxiii
4/3: chuck: Vomit, be ill.
1977 (con. 1949) J.G. Dunne True Confessions (1979) 36: The first thing
Bingo did when he saw the body was chuck his Wheaties.
1983 A. Payne ‘Senior Citizen Caine’ in Minder [TV script] 60: I don't
want him chucking up over me overalls, boss.
1998 K. Sampson Awaydays 142: I get out and over one of the dinky timber
bridges before chucking up pure bile into the pond.
2000 N. Griffiths Grits 277: Even someone like Roger ther, chuckin up
noisily inter the sink.
2005 H. Mantel Beyond Black 109: If you're going to chuck up, go outside
and do it.
The ones that give a hint suggest they're Australian, but that's not all
of them. None seems American.
Um, we were actually talking about AusE here. But 1977 is American.
And FWIW Chapman (Dict Am Slang, 1988) has "chuck 'to vomit' [= upchuck]".
Yes, well, he used to be WBEZ (Chicago) 's occasional commentator on
language issues, and didn't inspire great confidence in his observational
abilities.
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter T. Daniels
The participle might be "puking" here.
??
Sigh. If you substitute "puking" for "chucking," you get good informal,
somewhat indelicate American English. You can add "up" if a specific
egested component is then mentioned. ("Egest" is a favorite crossword
puzzle word.)
That's not what it means, though --- "egestion" is a near-synonym of
defecation (though it can also refer to the excretion of undigested
material from a single-celled organism).
--
It is probable that television drama of high caliber and produced by
first-rate artists will materially raise the level of dramatic taste
of the nation. ---David Sarnoff, CEO of RCA, 1939; in Stoll 1995
Peter Moylan
2021-04-27 01:40:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
Did "upchuck" exist before AmE was invented?
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Ross Clark
2021-04-27 04:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
Did "upchuck" exist before AmE was invented?
No, it's not like "woodchuck".
But interestingly, "upchuck" predates "chuck (up)".
Wentworth & Flexner: "Since c1925. Orig. student use. Considered a smart
and sophisticated term c1935, esp. when applied to sickness that had
been induced by overdrinking."
Green's first citation confirms this dating:
1936 (con. 1920s) Dos Passos Big Money in USA (1966) 906: He had to stop
to upchuck on the side of the road.
Mack A. Damia
2021-04-28 15:40:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 27 Apr 2021 12:40:18 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
Did "upchuck" exist before AmE was invented?
Ever hear "blowing chunks"?
CDB
2021-04-27 10:48:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ross Clark
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit"
since ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
"upchuck" for 'vomit', but not plain "chuck."
That is Chinook Jargon for "water", however, and (spelt "Chac" in our
letters) the name of the Mayan god of storms.
--
Have I mentioned that I have a natural affinity for water? It welcomes
me and loves me and holds me up. It knows my name.
bruce bowser
2021-04-26 19:02:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 25 Apr 2021 19:43:58 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
Reasonable.
Do you have the term "thunder(-)box" in Australian English?
thunder-box n. slang a portable commode; by extension,
any lavatory.
https://www.lexico.com/definition/thunderbox
That word inevitably brings to mind Major Bloodnok - a virtuoso on the
device.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have wondered whether "chunder" might be an abbreviation of "chuck
into a thunderbox"
Mh...
"Chunder" is actually attested slightly earlier (1950, in Neville
Shute's "A Town Like Alice"). "Chuck" appears (in Australia) from 1957.
But of course we've had "chuck" = "throw" and "throw up" = "vomit" since
ca. 1600, so earlier use seems quite probable.
I just googled 'Chander' which is a Hindu name from Sanskrit.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-26 01:25:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 25 Apr 2021 19:43:58 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
I will never understand Indians who insist that there's no such thing as
a word that the world got from anyone other than the Indians.
It wouldn't even have struck me as REASONABLE to go looking for origins
other than drunk Aussies making up words for that one.
Post by Madhu
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Post by Ross Clark
(Sounds suspiciously like a description of Barry McKenzie, another
stereotypical Australian.)
I suspect that it originated as a variant of "chuck".
Reasonable.
Do you have the term "thunder(-)box" in Australian English?
thunder-box n. slang a portable commode; by extension,
any lavatory.
https://www.lexico.com/definition/thunderbox
Yes, we have it, but I'm not sure when it entered AusE. It has the
flavour of a word that was brought back by soldiers in the world wars.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
I have wondered whether "chunder" might be an abbreviation of "chuck
into a thunderbox"
By now Jerry's explanation sounds more convincing to me.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
bruce bowser
2021-04-26 00:11:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Billowing?
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-26 02:22:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Billowing?
Eh, get 'em overinflated enough and they might billow.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Sam Plusnet
2021-04-26 19:54:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by bruce bowser
Post by Madhu
Post by Ross Clark
AND has a couple of citations of "barbie" antedating the Hogan
He propounded the natural and national virtues of the Aussie beach
barbie with beer and prawns, and the big chunder.
chunder? possibly a sikh variant of chandra but no...
chunder. verb.[no object] informal Australian, New Zealand. Vomit.
"I am still haunted my the look of horror on my beloved's face
as I chundered booze and party snacks over her billowing
cleavage."
Billowing?
Eh, get 'em overinflated enough and they might billow.
Her bosom was heaving with emotion. He was just heaving.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
bruce bowser
2021-04-24 08:52:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Tell dictionary .com, i'm sure they'd like to know.
-- https://www.dictionary.com/browse/barbeque
Lewis
2021-04-24 09:14:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Maybe not in Australia.

Fromteh BrE ODE:

barbecue | ˈbɑːbɪkjuː | (also barbeque)
noun
a meal or gathering at which meat, fish, or other food is cooked out of
doors on a rack over an open fire or on a special appliance: in the
evening there was a barbecue | [as modifier] : a barbecue area.

• a rack or appliance used for the preparation of food at a barbecue:
food was placed to sizzle on the barbecue.

• [mass noun] North American food cooked on a barbecue: all the barbecue
he could eat.

verb (barbecues, barbecuing, barbecued) [with object]

cook (food) on a barbecue: fish barbecued with herbs | (as adjective
barbecued) : barbecued chicken.

It is the same in the AmE NOAD.

IME, Barbeque is more common.
--
"Are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"I think so, Brain, but can you use the word 'asphalt' in polite
society?"
Peter Moylan
2021-04-24 08:51:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Maybe not in Australia.
barbecue | ˈbɑːbɪkjuː | (also barbeque) noun a meal or gathering at
which meat, fish, or other food is cooked out of doors on a rack over
an open fire or on a special appliance: in the evening there was a
barbecue | [as modifier] : a barbecue area.
• a rack or appliance used for the preparation of food at a
barbecue: food was placed to sizzle on the barbecue.
• [mass noun] North American food cooked on a barbecue: all the
barbecue he could eat.
verb (barbecues, barbecuing, barbecued) [with object]
cook (food) on a barbecue: fish barbecued with herbs | (as adjective
barbecued) : barbecued chicken.
It is the same in the AmE NOAD.
IME, Barbeque is more common.
Oh, I know I'm fighting a losing battle. It's all because of the BBQ
abbreviation. But I still retaliate by pronouncing barbeque as bar-beck.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
bruce bowser
2021-04-24 17:15:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Lewis
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Maybe not in Australia.
barbecue | ˈbɑːbɪkjuː | (also barbeque) noun a meal or gathering at
which meat, fish, or other food is cooked out of doors on a rack over
an open fire or on a special appliance: in the evening there was a
barbecue | [as modifier] : a barbecue area.
• a rack or appliance used for the preparation of food at a
barbecue: food was placed to sizzle on the barbecue.
• [mass noun] North American food cooked on a barbecue: all the
barbecue he could eat.
verb (barbecues, barbecuing, barbecued) [with object]
cook (food) on a barbecue: fish barbecued with herbs | (as adjective
barbecued) : barbecued chicken.
It is the same in the AmE NOAD.
IME, Barbeque is more common.
Oh, I know I'm fighting a losing battle.
Its never losing, because you never lost anything.
occam
2021-04-24 09:55:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
Hmm, my Australian and NZ mix of flatmates in London used 'barbie' quite
often in the 1980s. OK, as often as the sun shone in London. Not quite
so often.
Peter Moylan
2021-04-24 09:00:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
Hmm, my Australian and NZ mix of flatmates in London used 'barbie' quite
often in the 1980s. OK, as often as the sun shone in London. Not quite
so often.
Well, London was Barry Mackenzie country.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Quinn C
2021-04-24 12:41:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
Nobody's thinking of Klaus?
--
Somebody, your father or mine, should have told us that not many
people have ever died of love. But multitudes have perished, and
are perishing every hour [...] for the lack of it.
-- James Baldwin, Giovanni's Room
Bebercito
2021-04-24 19:06:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
Nobody's thinking of Klaus?
Or of Turic?
Post by Quinn C
--
Somebody, your father or mine, should have told us that not many
people have ever died of love. But multitudes have perished, and
are perishing every hour [...] for the lack of it.
-- James Baldwin, Giovanni's Room
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-24 13:30:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Frequently spelled "BBQ," which leads to back-spellings when one
tries to write it out.
Post by Peter Moylan
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on the
barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US market.
(Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would have been
unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask the average
Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will say it's a doll.
Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
"Prawn" is the AmE word for 'prawn' and "shrimp" is the AmE word for
'shrimp'. They're different critters.

But you won't deny, will you, that AusE is far more given to truncating
words than AmE is! Things like "convo" for "conversation."
Peter Moylan
2021-04-24 23:51:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Frequently spelled "BBQ," which leads to back-spellings when one
tries to write it out.
Post by Peter Moylan
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
"Prawn" is the AmE word for 'prawn' and "shrimp" is the AmE word for
'shrimp'. They're different critters.
But you won't deny, will you, that AusE is far more given to
truncating words than AmE is! Things like "convo" for
"conversation."
They are different here, too. But we don't eat shrimp because it's not
available here. Presumably the climate is not right for farming them
here, or something like that.

The most commonly available prawn species in Australia is the eastern
king prawn, which is right at the other end of the size spectrum from
shrimp.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Chrysi Cat
2021-04-25 04:08:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Frequently spelled "BBQ," which leads to back-spellings when one
tries to write it out.
Post by Peter Moylan
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
"Prawn" is the AmE word for 'prawn' and "shrimp" is the AmE word for
 'shrimp'. They're different critters.
But you won't deny, will you, that AusE is far more given to
truncating words than AmE is! Things like "convo" for
"conversation."
They are different here, too. But we don't eat shrimp because it's not
available here. Presumably the climate is not right for farming them
here, or something like that.
The most commonly available prawn species in Australia is the eastern
king prawn, which is right at the other end of the size spectrum from
shrimp.
North Americans ALSO mainly eat prawns. That said, we still refer to
them as "shrimp" as often as not when talking outside of scientific
settings. Specifically, a prawn is a "jumbo shrimp".

That's because prawns serve as culinary shrimp as surely as a squash
serves as a culinary veggie.

If anyone imported scampi to the US they would /also/ likely be referred
to as "shrimp" in the culinary sense.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter T. Daniels
2021-04-25 13:54:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bruce bowser
I never knew that 'barbie' meant bar-be-que.
It doesn't. It means barbecue. There is no 'q' in barbecue.
Frequently spelled "BBQ," which leads to back-spellings when one
tries to write it out.
Post by Peter Moylan
But "barbie" is, to some extent, fake Australian slang. "Shrimp on
the barbie" appeared in some advertising from Australia for the US
market. (Before the appearance of that ad, most Australians would
have been unaware that "shrimp" is the AmE word for "prawn".) Ask
the average Australian what "barbie" means, and most of them will
say it's a doll. Throwing food on a doll is not a custom here.
"Prawn" is the AmE word for 'prawn' and "shrimp" is the AmE word for
'shrimp'. They're different critters.
But you won't deny, will you, that AusE is far more given to
truncating words than AmE is! Things like "convo" for
"conversation."
They are different here, too. But we don't eat shrimp because it's not
available here. Presumably the climate is not right for farming them
here, or something like that.
The most commonly available prawn species in Australia is the eastern
king prawn, which is right at the other end of the size spectrum from
shrimp.
We get shrimps in all sorts of sizes. They come in bags in the freezer,
and the sizes are listed by the number there are in a pound. The Chinese
buffet (I hope it's found a way to survive the year) has a dish of tiny ones
in a very light sauce that goes nicely over rice.
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