Discussion:
what's the relationship in opera between FOLLICULI FOLLICULAR and Funiculì Funiculà?
(too old to reply)
b***@gmail.com
2015-06-10 05:52:34 UTC
Permalink
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
Peter T. Daniels
2015-06-10 11:57:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?

Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not putting
your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
b***@gmail.com
2015-06-11 21:09:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not putting
your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
JoeyDee
2015-06-11 21:26:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not
putting> your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
A Neapoitan nonsensical word (funiculi') precedes a word meaning
'funicular.' There's an inherent pun based on li' and la', both words
meaning 'there.' It's a song about riding the funicular. Songs don't
always make sense or translate well into other languages.
--
Remember: It is To Laugh
b***@gmail.com
2015-06-12 00:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by JoeyDee
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not
putting> your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
A Neapoitan nonsensical word (funiculi') precedes a word meaning
'funicular.' There's an inherent pun based on li' and la', both words
meaning 'there.' It's a song about riding the funicular. Songs don't
always make sense or translate well into other languages.
--
Remember: It is To Laugh
so it sounds a little like shizzle muh dizzle then donut?
Steve Hayes
2015-06-12 04:23:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not putting
your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
It means to go up and down steep hills in a tram.
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
CDB
2015-06-12 12:37:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not
putting your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
It isn't opera. It's an exuberant popular song celebrating the
construction of a funicular railway up Vesuvius. Apparently "lì" and
"là" both mean "there" in Italian, but my guess at the meaning of the
title is that the "lì--là" alternation was intended to recall pairs
like "qui--là". Funuculars here, funiculars there. Or maybe the
writers are just having fun with a weighted and a thinned version of
"funiculare". Obladi, oblada.

Wikipedia is usually your friend in these situations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funicul%C3%AC,_Funicul%C3%A0

ObWayback: When I listened to the clip you posted at the start of this
discussion (titled "Folliculi ..."), I heard those words pronounced with
[n], not [l]. That written version may mean little more than <dur>.
Katy Jennison
2015-06-12 12:55:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not
putting your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
It isn't opera. It's an exuberant popular song celebrating the
construction of a funicular railway up Vesuvius. Apparently "lì" and
"là" both mean "there" in Italian, but my guess at the meaning of the
title is that the "lì--là" alternation was intended to recall pairs
like "qui--là". Funuculars here, funiculars there. Or maybe the
writers are just having fun with a weighted and a thinned version of
"funiculare". Obladi, oblada.
And it isn't even there any more.
--
Katy Jennison
CDB
2015-06-12 13:18:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also
not putting your nonsensical questions into the subject
headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
It isn't opera. It's an exuberant popular song celebrating the
construction of a funicular railway up Vesuvius. Apparently "lì"
and "là" both mean "there" in Italian, but my guess at the meaning
of the title is that the "lì--là" alternation was intended to
recall pairs like "qui--là". Funuculars here, funiculars there.
Or maybe the writers are just having fun with a weighted and a
thinned version of "funiculare". Obladi, oblada.
And it isn't even there any more.
As with too many things follicular.
Traddict
2015-06-12 13:45:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not
putting your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
It isn't opera. It's an exuberant popular song celebrating the
construction of a funicular railway up Vesuvius. Apparently "lì" and
"là" both mean "there" in Italian, but my guess at the meaning of the
title is that the "lì--là" alternation was intended to recall pairs
like "qui--là".
The Fench pair is "(i)ci-là". As a matter of fact "funiculi-funicula" is a
direct, jocular, reference to "Figaro ci-Figaro là" found in Mozart's opera
"The Marriage of Figaro".

Funuculars here, funiculars there. Or maybe the
Post by CDB
writers are just having fun with a weighted and a thinned version of
"funiculare". Obladi, oblada.
Wikipedia is usually your friend in these situations.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Funicul%C3%AC,_Funicul%C3%A0
ObWayback: When I listened to the clip you posted at the start of this
discussion (titled "Folliculi ..."), I heard those words pronounced with
[n], not [l]. That written version may mean little more than <dur>.
CDB
2015-06-12 14:16:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Traddict
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not
putting your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
It isn't opera. It's an exuberant popular song celebrating the
construction of a funicular railway up Vesuvius. Apparently "lì" and
"là" both mean "there" in Italian, but my guess at the meaning of the
title is that the "lì--là" alternation was intended to recall pairs
like "qui--là".
The Fench pair is "(i)ci-là". As a matter of fact "funiculi-funicula" is
a direct, jocular, reference to "Figaro ci-Figaro là" found in Mozart's
opera "The Marriage of Figaro".
I wondered about that (but isn't it from "Largo al Factotum"* in the
Rossini opera?), but I decided the different stress-patterns and
placement of the corresponding phrases didn't justify a guess. That
isn't to say I think you're wrong.

*Looking that up, as I usually try to do before sending, I find that
"largo" is not the musical term, used ironically for a frenetic piece,
but Italian for "make a space". LAL.

[...]
Traddict
2015-06-12 15:14:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Traddict
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not
putting your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Yeah but I still don't know what Funiculì Funiculà means in English?
It isn't opera. It's an exuberant popular song celebrating the
construction of a funicular railway up Vesuvius. Apparently "lì" and
"là" both mean "there" in Italian, but my guess at the meaning of the
title is that the "lì--là" alternation was intended to recall pairs
like "qui--là".
The Fench pair is "(i)ci-là". As a matter of fact "funiculi-funicula" is
a direct, jocular, reference to "Figaro ci-Figaro là" found in Mozart's
opera "The Marriage of Figaro".
I wondered about that (but isn't it from "Largo al Factotum"* in the
Rossini opera?),
You're right, it is, my mistake.

but I decided the different stress-patterns and
Post by CDB
placement of the corresponding phrases didn't justify a guess. That isn't
to say I think you're wrong.
*Looking that up, as I usually try to do before sending, I find that
"largo" is not the musical term, used ironically for a frenetic piece, but
Italian for "make a space". LAL.
[...]
m***@gmail.com
2020-01-05 19:12:10 UTC
Permalink
As part of my italian heritage, i can swear to you that the whole song is a pun. It has a hidden sexual joke, typical of southern europe humor. That's probably the reason it was very popular at that time. It tells a story of a boy trying to bring his girl to a ride. "Lì" and "Là" can be both be translated as "there", but Lì is a little closer, so in English you can translate them as "here" and "there". Funiculare, as you all know, was the cable train, a fun thing to visit at that time. But, when saying it rapidly, "Funiculì, Funiculà" becames indistinguishable from "fornico lì, fornico là". I don't need to translate this because we have related english words such as "fornicate". It is worth mentioning however, that the italian verb implies pre-marital sex, that was the sole meaning back then. This meaning becamoes even clear after this part at the end of the song: "Stu core canta sempe nu taluorno: Sposamme, oje né! Sposamme, oje né!", which is translated as "My heart is singing the same refrain: We should be wed! We should be wed!"
b***@gmail.com
2015-06-11 21:45:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
The former doesn't exist?
Would you consider sobering up before assaulting AUE, and also not putting
your nonsensical questions into the subject headings?
Now when you ask would you consider not putting your nonsensical questions into the subject headings, just where did you want me to put it, and which "subject heading(s) are you talking about -- the original one you call a Subject heading or the follow up under GGs I call a subject line? Under GGs, a followup user can keep the original "suject heading" that launches a thread or they can edit it as a 'suject line' as needed. Under a newsreader this redundancy can be confusing but i wouldn't know since I don't have one. If it is a big and confusing deal, say so and I'll do my best to always keep the original subject line with the proviso and understanding that under GGs begging a new question is sometimes economical and does have its virtues. Thanks.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2015-06-10 12:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke. This YouTube video of Danny Jones singing Funiculi Funicula is
titled Foliculi Folicula:



That was his performance in week 4 of the UK TV competition "Popstar to
Operastar"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popstar_to_Operastar_%28series_1%29
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2015-06-10 14:42:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
That was his performance in week 4 of the UK TV competition "Popstar to
Operastar"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popstar_to_Operastar_%28series_1%29
Oh, no. The world does _not_ need more Andrea Bocellis, Josh Grobans, Charlotte
Churches, or Susan Boyles. I forget the name of the 11-year-old who almost won
AGT a couple years ago, but before classical CDs ceased to be sold in stores in
NYC in December 2013, I saw that she had an album out.

For the last several seasons of AGT there have been more than one attempt at
rendering "Nessun Dorma" (Pavarotti has a lot more to answer for than his own
lack of musicianship). The judges, having no frame of reference whatsoever,
always go gaga.

The vocal technique of singing with a microphone is utterly different from
singing unamplified to a large theater.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2015-06-10 16:15:13 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 10 Jun 2015 07:42:49 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
That was his performance in week 4 of the UK TV competition "Popstar to
Operastar"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popstar_to_Operastar_%28series_1%29
Oh, no. The world does _not_ need more Andrea Bocellis, Josh Grobans, Charlotte
Churches, or Susan Boyles.
Fear not! It was purely an entertainment show. It was not intended as a
starting point for a career singing opera.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I forget the name of the 11-year-old who almost won
AGT a couple years ago, but before classical CDs ceased to be sold in stores in
NYC in December 2013, I saw that she had an album out.
For the last several seasons of AGT there have been more than one attempt at
rendering "Nessun Dorma" (Pavarotti has a lot more to answer for than his own
lack of musicianship). The judges, having no frame of reference whatsoever,
always go gaga.
The vocal technique of singing with a microphone is utterly different from
singing unamplified to a large theater.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Traddict
2015-06-10 15:27:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke.
Probably, but "Folicula" would be perfectly suited to the "Hair" rock opera.

This YouTube video of Danny Jones singing Funiculi Funicula is
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
http://youtu.be/vjS4ptWW2w0
That was his performance in week 4 of the UK TV competition "Popstar to
Operastar"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popstar_to_Operastar_%28series_1%29
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Dr. HotSalt
2015-06-10 16:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Traddict
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke.
Probably, but "Folicula" would be perfectly suited to the "Hair" rock opera.
Yabbut, which hair band should do the soundtrack?


Dr. HotSalt
Jerry Friedman
2015-06-10 16:28:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Traddict
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke.
Probably, but "Folicula" would be perfectly suited to the "Hair" rock opera.
Yabbut, which hair band should do the soundtrack?
I think you're splitting hairs there.
--
Jerry Friedman
Traddict
2015-06-10 17:12:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Traddict
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke.
Probably, but "Folicula" would be perfectly suited to the "Hair" rock opera.
Yabbut, which hair band should do the soundtrack?
I think you're splitting hairs there.
I can't find anything else, I must be having a bad hair day.
Post by Jerry Friedman
--
Jerry Friedman
Mike Barnes
2015-06-10 17:01:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Traddict
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke.
Probably, but "Folicula" would be perfectly suited to the "Hair" rock opera.
Yabbut, which hair band should do the soundtrack?
Alice Cooper.
--
Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
Traddict
2015-06-11 04:06:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Traddict
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke.
Probably, but "Folicula" would be perfectly suited to the "Hair" rock opera.
Yabbut, which hair band should do the soundtrack?
The Swags, to be sure.
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Dr. HotSalt
Phil Carmody
2015-06-11 21:50:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dr. HotSalt
Post by Traddict
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by b***@gmail.com
and how do you find it under Google Translate?
It appears to be a mis-spelling. It might be a mistake or it might be a
joke.
Probably, but "Folicula" would be perfectly suited to the "Hair" rock opera.
Yabbut, which hair band should do the soundtrack?
More like something bluesy or jazzy - you have to go back to the
style's roots.

Phil
--
A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state,
the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall be well regulated.
c***@gmail.com
2018-07-02 16:02:46 UTC
Permalink
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.

PLEASE HELP.....
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-02 16:21:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
This?


Mack A. Damia
2018-07-02 17:36:14 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 02 Jul 2018 09:21:44 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
This?
http://youtu.be/XW0W7j04iRQ
OIC, you are looking for the ride in Portugal.

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g189180-d2470983-Reviews-Funicular_dos_Guindais-Porto_Porto_District_Northern_Portugal.html
John Varela
2018-07-02 16:56:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."

My wife hates anything of the sort. I got her to go on the one at
Montserrat, in Catalunya, and while descending she turned to me and
said, "When we get to the bottom I'm going to kill you." AFTER we
got to the bottom, but not before.
--
John Varela
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-02 17:11:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS
AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO,
PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA,
FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."
My wife hates anything of the sort. I got her to go on the one at
Montserrat, in Catalunya, and while descending she turned to me and
said, "When we get to the bottom I'm going to kill you." AFTER we
got to the bottom, but not before.
But she didn't, apparently?
--
athel
John Varela
2018-07-04 23:19:47 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 2 Jul 2018 17:11:28 UTC, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by John Varela
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS
AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO,
PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA,
FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."
My wife hates anything of the sort. I got her to go on the one at
Montserrat, in Catalunya, and while descending she turned to me and
said, "When we get to the bottom I'm going to kill you." AFTER we
got to the bottom, but not before.
But she didn't, apparently?
Not yet.

And incidentally, we've been on the one in Porto that so frightened
the OP and it didn't bother the wife at all. The Porto one is
short, about like the one at Montmartre, and originates at sea
level, unlike the one at Montserrat.
--
John Varela
Ken Blake
2018-07-02 18:17:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."
Yes, but unlike an elevator, it goes at a 45 degree or so angle, not
straight up and down.

Some think the world is made for fun and frolic,
And so do I! And so do I!
Some think it well to be all melancholic,
To pine and sigh; to pine and sigh;
But I, I love to spend my time in singing,
Some joyous song, some joyous song,
To set the air with music bravely ringing
Is far from wrong! Is far from wrong!
Harken, harken, music sounds a-far!
Harken, harken, with a happy heart!
Funiculì, funiculà, funiculì, funiculà!
Joy is everywhere, funiculì, funiculà!
RH Draney
2018-07-02 18:51:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by John Varela
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."
Yes, but unlike an elevator, it goes at a 45 degree or so angle, not
straight up and down.
And not, in my experience, particularly frightening...the landmark
"Angels Flight" in Los Angeles was one such:



....r
Ken Blake
2018-07-02 19:17:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by RH Draney
Post by Ken Blake
Post by John Varela
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."
Yes, but unlike an elevator, it goes at a 45 degree or so angle, not
straight up and down.
And not, in my experience, particularly frightening...
Ditto.
John Varela
2018-07-04 23:13:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by John Varela
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."
Yes, but unlike an elevator, it goes at a 45 degree or so angle, not
straight up and down.
Neither I nor the dictionary said or implied verticality. Your
typical mountainside is not vertical, and elevators do not run on
rails, at least, none that I've seen.
--
John Varela
Ken Blake
2018-07-04 23:39:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
Post by Ken Blake
Post by John Varela
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO, PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA, FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
Funicular railroad. Dictionary definition: "a cable railroad,
especially one on a mountainside, in which ascending and descending
cars are counterbalanced."
Yes, but unlike an elevator, it goes at a 45 degree or so angle, not
straight up and down.
Neither I nor the dictionary said or implied verticality. Your
typical mountainside is not vertical, and elevators do not run on
rails, at least, none that I've seen.
Right. But ***@gmail.com said "FEELS AS IF YOU'RE GOING
STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED" and that's what my point was about.
Mark Brader
2018-07-05 23:21:18 UTC
Permalink
Your typical mountainside is not vertical,
Indeed.
and elevators do not run on rails, at least, none that I've seen.
Depends on what you mean by "on". Vertical rails guide the elevator car
(or "cab") but, of course, do not support its weight.

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Using rails in this way seems only sensible, but I'm no expert on elevators
and don't know if there are also designs that don't use them.
--
Mark Brader "Never re-invent the wheel unnecessarily;
Toronto yours may have corners."
***@vex.net -- Henry Spencer

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Peter Moylan
2018-07-03 14:28:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@gmail.com
IT'S A RIDE, LIKE AN ELEVATOR, BUT SCARY LIKE A ROLLER COASTER. FEELS
AS IF YOU'RE GOING STRAIGHT DOWN AT GREAT SPEED. WAS ON IT IN PORTO,
PORTUGAL, BUT CAN'T THINK OF THE NAME. SOUNDS LIKE FERNICULA,
FURNICULA? DON'T KNOW HOW TO SPELL IT OR CORRECT NAME.
PLEASE HELP.....
Funiculi, funicula.

Your Caps Lock key appears to be stuck, by the way.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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