Discussion:
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
(too old to reply)
Dingbat
2017-12-01 05:34:20 UTC
Permalink
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?

Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?

Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging its
lower floor:
Loading Image...
b***@aol.com
2017-12-01 06:01:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?
Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging its
https://media.architecturaldigest.com/photos/5907a7d8ca0b76474b000f2e/master/w_640,c_limit/Ugliest%2520Skyscrapers%2520in%2520the%2520World%252014.jpg
An inverted pyramid (building).
Dingbat
2017-12-01 07:01:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?
Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging
https://media.architecturaldigest.com/photos/5907a7d8ca0b76474b000f2e/master/w_640,c_limit/Ugliest%2520Skyscrapers%2520in%2520the%2520World%252014.jpg
An inverted pyramid (building).
This one.

... and this one (a library at UCSD):
Loading Image...

Not every building with overhanging floors is shaped like an inverted
pyramid.
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-01 11:04:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?
Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging
https://media.architecturaldigest.com/photos/5907a7d8ca0b76474b000f2e/mast
er/w_640,c_limit/Ugliest%2520Skyscrapers%2520in%2520the%2520World%252014
.jpg
Post by Dingbat
Post by b***@aol.com
An inverted pyramid (building).
This one.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Geisel_Library,_UCSD.jpg
Not every building with overhanging floors is shaped like an inverted
pyramid.
This a more conventional counterexample
<Loading Image...>
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<Loading Image...>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',

Jan
occam
2017-12-01 12:30:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<http://i.imgur.com/FdMWU.jpg>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',
Ditto 'en plein air'. (Is that swimming pool open or covered?)
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-01 20:50:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<http://i.imgur.com/FdMWU.jpg>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',
Ditto 'en plein air'. (Is that swimming pool open or covered?)
It's open. There isn't much need for covering in Spain,
and it doesn't look like many leaves will blow in.
The building is called 'The Hemeroscopium House'.
(supposedly from Greek, 'the place where the sun sets')

Surprisingly, it took only seven days to build.
(after a year of prefabricating the elements)
There are time lapse videos on the web,

Jan
Ross
2017-12-01 23:07:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<http://i.imgur.com/FdMWU.jpg>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',
Ditto 'en plein air'. (Is that swimming pool open or covered?)
It's open. There isn't much need for covering in Spain,
and it doesn't look like many leaves will blow in.
The building is called 'The Hemeroscopium House'.
(supposedly from Greek, 'the place where the sun sets')
Hm. Looks like it could be literally (Greco-Latin) '[place for]
watching the day', which I guess is not too far from 'watching
the day end'. (My little Greek dictionary actually has, with
a different suffix, ἡμερο-σκόπος /he:mero-skópos/ 'watching by
day; a day-watcher', for what that's worth.)
Peter Moylan
2017-12-02 01:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<http://i.imgur.com/FdMWU.jpg>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',
I thought you were going to point to something like this

<URL:https://www.businessinsider.com.au/viral-video-42-floor-high-glass-bottomed-swimming-pool-houston-texas-2017-4?r=US&IR=T>

https://tinyurl.com/y8daoq7f

It would terrify me to swim in one of those. It's bad enough swimming
out over the edge of a reef.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-14 12:43:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<http://i.imgur.com/FdMWU.jpg>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',
I thought you were going to point to something like this
<URL:https://www.businessinsider.com.au/viral-video-42-floor-high-glass-bottom
ed-swimming-pool-houston-texas-2017-4?r=US&IR=T>
Post by Peter Moylan
https://tinyurl.com/y8daoq7f
It would terrify me to swim in one of those. It's bad enough swimming
out over the edge of a reef.
I have experienced a similar sensation without any water,
in a building where part of the floor is glass.
First time there I had the urge to feel with a toe if it really held.
(like testing the ice on a pond)
Even then I still dilike walking out on it.

I guess I would hate those all-glass cantilever stairs too, like:

<http://www.ebizbydesign.com/21074/ideas/innovative-glass-staircase-desi
gn-staircase-design-ideas-real-homes/>

Jan
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-15 08:29:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<http://i.imgur.com/FdMWU.jpg>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',
I thought you were going to point to something like this
<URL:https://www.businessinsider.com.au/viral-video-42-floor-high-glass-bottom
ed-swimming-pool-houston-texas-2017-4?r=US&IR=T>
Post by Peter Moylan
https://tinyurl.com/y8daoq7f
It would terrify me to swim in one of those. It's bad enough swimming
out over the edge of a reef.
I have experienced a similar sensation without any water,
in a building where part of the floor is glass.
First time there I had the urge to feel with a toe if it really held.
(like testing the ice on a pond)
Even then I still dilike walking out on it.
Me too. There is a new(ish) museum in Marseilles that has a large
extension hanging over the pond beneath it
(Loading Image...
or https://tinyurl.com/yat8dfl7). I think it has a glass floor, but I
haven't been there lately. Anyway, I feel nervous walking over it.
Post by Peter Moylan
<http://www.ebizbydesign.com/21074/ideas/innovative-glass-staircase-desi
gn-staircase-design-ideas-real-homes/>
Jan
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-15 10:29:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
You can even have a cantilevered swimming pool
<http://i.imgur.com/FdMWU.jpg>
which gives an entirely new interpretation of 'free horizon',
I thought you were going to point to something like this
<URL:https://www.businessinsider.com.au/viral-video-42-floor-high-glass-bot
tom
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
ed-swimming-pool-houston-texas-2017-4?r=US&IR=T>
Post by Peter Moylan
https://tinyurl.com/y8daoq7f
It would terrify me to swim in one of those. It's bad enough swimming
out over the edge of a reef.
I have experienced a similar sensation without any water,
in a building where part of the floor is glass.
First time there I had the urge to feel with a toe if it really held.
(like testing the ice on a pond)
Even then I still dilike walking out on it.
Me too. There is a new(ish) museum in Marseilles that has a large
extension hanging over the pond beneath it
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mucem-Villa-de-la-Mediterannee-Marseille.j
pg
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
or https://tinyurl.com/yat8dfl7).
Not clickable for me with the ( around both but
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Mucem-Villa-de-la-Mediterannee-Marseille.jpg>
and <https://tinyurl.com/yat8dfl7> work.

This looks great. I haven't been in Marseilles for a long time
but this looks like Michelin *** quality for me, 'vaut le voyage'.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
I think it has a glass floor, but I
haven't been there lately. Anyway, I feel nervous walking over it.
Wiki pictures say the overhang has a solid floor,
but there are large glass panels in it.

The problem must me more general.
There is another glass floor I know about
where they painted fake tiles on for reassurance.

Jan

Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-12-01 11:31:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Dingbat
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?
Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging its
https://media.architecturaldigest.com/photos/5907a7d8ca0b76474b000f2e/master/w_640,c_limit/Ugliest%2520Skyscrapers%2520in%2520the%2520World%252014.jpg
An inverted pyramid (building).
If it's a building along a main street we call it a butterwalk.
--
athel
occam
2017-12-01 12:16:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?
Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging its
https://media.architecturaldigest.com/photos/5907a7d8ca0b76474b000f2e/master/w_640,c_limit/Ugliest%2520Skyscrapers%2520in%2520the%2520World%252014.jpg
Umbrella structure?
Peter T. Daniels
2017-12-01 13:58:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?
Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging its
Cantilevered.
John Varela
2017-12-03 18:01:20 UTC
Permalink
It depends on what type of building it is.

<https://www.google.com/search?q=garrison+colonial+style+house&ie=ut
f-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:unofficial&client=firefox-a&
gws_rd=ssl>
--
John Varela
J. J. Lodder
2017-12-03 20:52:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
It depends on what type of building it is.
<https://www.google.com/search?q=garrison+colonial+style+house&ie=ut
f-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:unofficial&client=firefox-a&
gws_rd=ssl>
Well, 'colonial' is the oldest you have got, over there.
In Medieval European cities overhang was the rule
rather than the exception.
Conditions often became crowded within the city walls
and free building space became non-existent, so....

In the USA it became merely a style of building,

Jan

Some pituresque examples in
<https://www.france-voyage.com/frankrijk-foto-s/foto-s-kaysersberg-336.htm>
(Alsace, nowadays in France)
s***@gmail.com
2017-12-04 19:30:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Varela
It depends on what type of building it is.
<https://www.google.com/search?q=garrison+colonial+style+house&ie=ut
f-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:unofficial&client=firefox-a&
gws_rd=ssl>
I take it you did your search while using a firefox browser?

/dps
occam
2017-12-14 08:57:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
What do you call a building with upper floors overhanging lower ones?
Jettied?
Cantilevered?
Corbeled?
Slovak Radio Building - multistory with every higher floor overhanging its
https://media.architecturaldigest.com/photos/5907a7d8ca0b76474b000f2e/master/w_640,c_limit/Ugliest%2520Skyscrapers%2520in%2520the%2520World%252014.jpg
This one, planned as the new headquarters for ArcelorMittal in
Luxembourg, I'd call a 'plant pot'.

Loading Image...
Loading...