Discussion:
having spent only 15 dollars
(too old to reply)
Yurui Liu
2019-11-12 17:08:16 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively speaking" okay,
in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause verb "holds" and the
participial phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days"?

Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every other
day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings rather tightly,
having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days.


And what is the relation between the main clause predicate
"holds the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15
dollars during the past four days"?

I'd appreciate your help.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-12 17:19:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively speaking" okay,
in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause verb "holds" and the
participial phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every other
day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings rather tightly,
having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days.
There's no point to it at all. If you had to draw some sort of context,
you might use "on the other hand" or "however."
Post by Yurui Liu
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate
"holds the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15
dollars during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
The latter explicates the former. "Holds the purse strings" is a somewhat
vivid expression that isn't immediately clear.
Jack
2019-11-12 20:13:09 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 12 Nov 2019 09:08:16 -0800 (PST), Yurui Liu
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively speaking" okay,
in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause verb "holds" and the
participial phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every other
day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings rather tightly,
having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days.
The sentence is ok, comparing John's recent average daily spend of
$1.875 with the $50 / day and $15 / day spending of the other two
people. But why change the denominator for each example (per day, per
two days/ per 8 days)?
Post by Yurui Liu
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate
"holds the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15
dollars during the past four days"?
It says that he doesn't spend much, compared to the other two, and
demonstrates that by specifiying just how much he spent in a specific
time period. And your example said 'eight days', not 'f
Eric Walker
2019-11-13 08:08:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively speaking" okay,
in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause verb "holds" and the
participial phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every other
day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings rather
tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds the
purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars during
the past four days"?
If we recast, the matter becomes clearer:

"Having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days, John holds the
purse strings rather tightly compared to the other two."

We now see plainly that the opening--"Having spent only 15 dollars during
the past eight days"--is the famous "dangling participle". Here, it is
just fine, as the noun it modifies immediately follows it. Danglers are
only problems when the noun is off somewhere else: "Walking down the
street, a fire engine caught John's attention."

In the original, the dangler is still OK because it is quite clear what
it is modifying. (A dangler need not precede its referent: "The service
is to be performed standing.")

The only thing one might cavil over in the original is that leading
phrase "Comparatively speaking", which is another dangler that seems (by
its placement) to be referring to John; better would be "In comparison".
--
Cordially,
Eric Walker
s***@my-deja.com
2019-11-15 02:32:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively speaking" okay,
in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause verb "holds" and the
participial phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every other
day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings rather tightly,
having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate
"holds the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15
dollars during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint
old fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his
money" would suit me better.

2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the battle,
the remains of the army struggled towards the coast"
In this case I would use "as he has spent"

So my version would be:-
"John is rather more careful with his money as he has spent only 15
dollars in the last eight days"
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-15 07:39:52 UTC
Permalink
[ … ]
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Yurui Liu
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate
"holds the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15
dollars during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint
old fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his
money" would suit me better.
Not just quaint; inappropriate. "holds the purse strings" implies that
one person (a husband, for example) restricts the amount of money
another person (such as his wife) can spend. In this case there is just
one person careful with his money.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-15 14:36:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ … ]
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Yurui Liu
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate
"holds the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15
dollars during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint
old fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his
money" would suit me better.
Not just quaint; inappropriate. "holds the purse strings" implies that
one person (a husband, for example) restricts the amount of money
another person (such as his wife) can spend. In this case there is just
one person careful with his money.
Why did you maliciously snip the sentence under discussion?

Copy-pasting it from the very message you quoted, showing exactly who
committed the sin of snipping the most relevant portion of the context,
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every other
day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings rather tightly,
having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-11-15 11:54:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively speaking" okay,
in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause verb "holds" and the
participial phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every other
day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings rather tightly,
having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate
"holds the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15
dollars during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint
old fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his
money" would suit me better.
My understanding of "hold the purse strings" is as here -
OED:
purse string, n.

2. figurative. Chiefly in plural, esp. in various phrases relating
to the control of money, as 'to hold the purse strings': to control
expenditure.

It does not necessarily mean being frugal or miserly.
Post by s***@my-deja.com
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the battle,
the remains of the army struggled towards the coast"
In this case I would use "as he has spent"
So my version would be:-
"John is rather more careful with his money as he has spent only 15
dollars in the last eight days"
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
CDB
2019-11-15 12:17:39 UTC
Permalink
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.

It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
s***@my-deja.com
2019-11-15 23:51:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.
It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
Yes, the ablative absolute is a "two time stage" process. Action one having already happened, the way is clear for action two to be described.

Here the eight day spend is not proof, but merely an illustration, so
that a break in the flow is justified.

"John is more careful with his money. In the last eight days he has spend
only 15 dollars." (Present simple for "now" and present perfect for "up to now"
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-16 03:49:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by CDB
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.
It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
Yes, the ablative absolute is a "two time stage" process. Action one having already happened, the way is clear for action two to be described.
I agree with CDB that it's not an absolute. It attaches to "John".
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Here the eight day spend is not proof, but merely an illustration, so
that a break in the flow is justified.
"John is more careful with his money. In the last eight days he has spend
only 15 dollars." (Present simple for "now" and present perfect for "up to now"
But what if John spent 70 dollars a day for the previous month?
--
Jerry Friedman
s***@my-deja.com
2019-11-16 12:56:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by CDB
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.
It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
Yes, the ablative absolute is a "two time stage" process. Action one
having already happened, the way is clear for action two to be described.
Iagree with CDB that it's not an absolute. It attaches to "John".
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Here the eight day spend is not proof, but merely an illustration, so
that a break in the flow is justified.
"John is more careful with his money. In the last eight days he has spend
only 15 dollars." (Present simple for "now" and present perfect for "up to now"
But what if John spent 70 dollars a day for the previous month?
--
Jerry Friedman
Exactly. The truth or not of the statement depends solely on the reliability
of the author. The fifteen dollars is only an illustration of recent
expenditure, so it deserves to be unlinked from the statement. The seventy
dollars challenges the statement but does not turn the first illustration
into a lie.
b***@aol.com
2019-11-16 17:54:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by CDB
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.
It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
Yes, the ablative absolute is a "two time stage" process. Action one
having already happened, the way is clear for action two to be described.
Iagree with CDB that it's not an absolute. It attaches to "John".
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Here the eight day spend is not proof, but merely an illustration, so
that a break in the flow is justified.
"John is more careful with his money. In the last eight days he has spend
only 15 dollars." (Present simple for "now" and present perfect for "up to now"
But what if John spent 70 dollars a day for the previous month?
--
Jerry Friedman
Exactly. The truth or not of the statement depends solely on the reliability
of the author. The fifteen dollars is only an illustration of recent
expenditure, so it deserves to be unlinked from the statement. The seventy
dollars challenges the statement but does not turn the first illustration
into a lie.
But the OP's question was about the tense sequence for a reason, as it seems
changing it could solve the issue, e.g.:

"Comparatively speaking, John has held the purse strings rather tightly in
the past eight days, having spent only 15 dollars."
Ken Blake
2019-11-16 20:37:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by CDB
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way
of describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.
It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
Yes, the ablative absolute is a "two time stage" process. Action one having already happened, the way is clear for action two to be described.
I remember very little of what I learned in Latin class in high school,
but for some reason, I remember the example we got about 67 years ago of
the ablative absolute: "Consuls having been elected, Kings were driven
from the city." I have no idea why I remember it in English, but not in
Latin.
--
Ken
Snidely
2019-11-17 09:57:16 UTC
Permalink
On Saturday, Ken Blake pointed out that ...
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way of
describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.
It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
Yes, the ablative absolute is a "two time stage" process. Action one having
already happened, the way is clear for action two to be described.
I remember very little of what I learned in Latin class in high school, but
for some reason, I remember the example we got about 67 years ago of the
ablative absolute: "Consuls having been elected, Kings were driven from the
city." I have no idea why I remember it in English, but not in Latin.
Whenever I see "ablative" I think of space capsules and furnaces.

/dps
--
Killing a mouse was hardly a Nobel Prize-worthy exercise, and Lawrence
went apopleptic when he learned a lousy rodent had peed away all his
precious heavy water.
_The Disappearing Spoon_, Sam Kean
Lewis
2019-11-17 15:53:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snidely
On Saturday, Ken Blake pointed out that ...
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Hi, Is the following sentence beginning with "Comparatively
speaking" okay, in terms of the tense sequence of the main-clause
verb "holds" and the participial phrase "having spent only 15
dollars during the past eight days"?
Peter spends 50 dollars every day. Sam spends 30 dollars every
other day. Comparatively speaking, John holds the purse strings
rather tightly, having spent only 15 dollars during the past eight
days.
And what is the relation between the main clause predicate "holds
the purse strings rather tightly" and "having spent only 15 dollars
during the past four days"?
I'd appreciate your help.
1. "holds the purse strings" is to my mind a rather quaint old
fashioned expression. "John is rather more careful with his money"
would suit me better.
2. "Having spent" is like a Latin ablative absolute, a condensed way of
describing previous events in a few words. "Having lost the
battle, the remains of the army struggled towards the coast" In this
case I would use "as he has spent"
That's not actually an absolute construction, since in both cases
(sorry) the participle modifies the subject of the main clause. The
phrase "having spent only 15 dollars during the past four days"
describes John and justifies the statement that he is careful with his
money in comparison with Peter and Sam.
It bothers me a little that their spending habits are given in the
general present tense while the justifying phrase is in the particular
present-perfect. I would prefer a colon and a finite verb to a comma
there: "John holds the purse strings rather tightly: he has spent only
fifteen dollars during the past eight days". I wouldn't say the other
construction is wrong; I'm merely fussing.
So my version would be:- "John is rather more careful with his money
as he has spent only 15 dollars in the last eight days"
That would work too. Everything is in a "present" tense because, in
both uses, the speaker is commenting at about the same time as the
events described.
Yes, the ablative absolute is a "two time stage" process. Action one having
already happened, the way is clear for action two to be described.
I remember very little of what I learned in Latin class in high school, but
for some reason, I remember the example we got about 67 years ago of the
ablative absolute: "Consuls having been elected, Kings were driven from the
city." I have no idea why I remember it in English, but not in Latin.
Whenever I see "ablative" I think of space capsules and furnaces.
Always reminds me of the early space-based role playing game, Traveller,
which had ablative armor (useful against laser weapons, not much use
otherwise, IIRC).
--
A bad day using a Mac is better than a good day using Windows
Loading...