Discussion:
smitten by
(too old to reply)
a***@gmail.com
2019-01-17 05:48:57 UTC
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1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.

2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten with
her.



Which is grammatical?

Which makes sense?

Which is idiomatic?


Gratefully,
Navi
Peter Young
2019-01-17 07:38:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.
2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten with
her.
Which is grammatical?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which makes sense?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which is idiomatic?
2 is more idiomatic in BrE.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-17 07:49:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.
2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten with
her.
Which is grammatical?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which makes sense?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which is idiomatic?
2 is more idiomatic in BrE.
I think one would often just say "smitten", with no prepositional
phrase after it, because it would be obvious from the previous who the
smiter was.
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-17 14:55:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.
2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten with
her.
Which is grammatical?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which makes sense?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which is idiomatic?
2 is more idiomatic in BrE.
Same in AmE. "Smitten by" meaning "in love with, infatuated with"
sounds odd to me, but people use it.

At COCA

smitten with: 238
smitten by: 127
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2019-01-17 15:34:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Young
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.
2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think
he's smitten with her.
Which is grammatical?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which makes sense?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which is idiomatic?
2 is more idiomatic in BrE.
Same in AmE. "Smitten by" meaning "in love with, infatuated with"
sounds odd to me, but people use it.
At COCA
smitten with: 238 smitten by: 127
I have the impression that I would use "with" with the adjective and
"by" with the past participle. "I think he's <smitten with her><been
smitten by her charms>." (The change is intended to eliminate contusion.)
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-17 15:50:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.
2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think
he's smitten with her.
Which is grammatical?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which makes sense?
Both
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which is idiomatic?
2 is more idiomatic in BrE.
Same in AmE.  "Smitten by" meaning "in love with, infatuated with"
sounds odd to me, but people use it.
At COCA
smitten with: 238 smitten by: 127
I have the impression that I would use "with" with the adjective and
"by" with the past participle.  "I think he's <smitten with her><been
smitten by her charms>."  (The change is intended to eliminate contusion.)
That would work for me. COCA has examples of both uses of "smitten by",
including some that I can't classify.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2019-01-17 11:47:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.
2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's
smitten with her.
Which is grammatical?
Which makes sense?
Which is idiomatic?
They're both acceptable. I avoid such expressions myself, though,
because I'm uncomfortable with the image of Caroline smiting him.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-17 18:51:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's smitten by her.
2) He hasn't been his old self since he met Caroline. I think he's
smitten with her.
Which is grammatical?
Which makes sense?
Which is idiomatic?
They're both acceptable. I avoid such expressions myself, though,
because I'm uncomfortable with the image of Caroline smiting him.
Doesn't "smitten with" imply that a third party picked the woman up and
swung her at him?
--
Sam Plusnet
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