Discussion:
What are the English replacements of PINXIT, etc.?
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Dingbat
2021-01-17 02:18:38 UTC
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On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was appended to the original artist's name:

FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT

Are there English replacements for these terms?
Peter Moylan
2021-01-17 04:15:41 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.

For more modern instruments, I'd expect something akin to a patent or
copyright statement.

Inside my main guitar, a Yamaha G-225, there is a piece of paper saying
something about either the guitar or the company, but my eyes aren't
good enough to figure it out.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 04:43:09 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
...

Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2021-01-17 05:04:24 UTC
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On Sat, 16 Jan 2021 20:43:09 -0800 (PST), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
...
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
According to this:
https://www.princetonviolins.com/blog/how-to-tell-a-real-stradivarius-violin/
the word would be "Faciebat" followed by "Anno" with the meaning "I
made it in this year" if either real or a good counterfeit.

Even the one that he made ten years after his death has "Faciebat
Anno".
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Sam Plusnet
2021-01-17 19:42:52 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Ken Blake
2021-01-17 21:36:35 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
--
Ken
Ken Blake
2021-01-17 21:38:32 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
--
Ken
Sam Plusnet
2021-01-17 22:52:49 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari
instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]"  The
reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba.  They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but  as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Ken Blake
2021-01-17 23:14:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari
instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]"  The
reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba.  They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but  as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
--
Ken
J. J. Lodder
2021-01-31 11:17:33 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
Yes, but the Stradivarius' superiority is mostly in the mind.
Blind and double blind testing consistently fails to demonstrate it.
The bottom line is that a Strad sounds great,
when you know that it is a Strad,

Jan
Ken Blake
2021-01-31 14:45:05 UTC
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Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have
been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
Yes, but the Stradivarius' superiority is mostly in the mind.
Blind and double blind testing consistently fails to demonstrate it.
The bottom line is that a Strad sounds great,
when you know that it is a Strad,
There no doubt in my mind that all (or at least most) Stradivarius
violins sound great. Are they all better than all their competitors?
Probably not. There have been lots of other great violin-makers, some
contemporary with Stradivarius, some much more recent.

Much the same is true of many other things: makers of other musical
instruments, literature, music, painting, etc.
--
Ken
Lewis
2021-01-31 16:48:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari
instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have
been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does
not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
Yes, but the Stradivarius' superiority is mostly in the mind.
Blind and double blind testing consistently fails to demonstrate it.
The bottom line is that a Strad sounds great,
when you know that it is a Strad,
There no doubt in my mind that all (or at least most) Stradivarius
violins sound great. Are they all better than all their competitors?
Not in blind tests, no. However, people who fail to distinguish them in
blind test will still insist the Stadivarious is better.

They are very good, and there are few violins that match them.

<https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=stadivarious%20blind%20tests>
--
perfectly ordinary books, printed on commonplace paper in mundane
ink. It would be a mistake to think that they weren't also
dangerous, just because reading them didn't make fireworks go off
in the sky. Reading them sometimes did the more dangerous trick
of making fireworks go off in the privacy of the reader's brain.
--Soul Music
Jerry Friedman
2021-02-01 16:35:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari
instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have
been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does
not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The
reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
Yes, but the Stradivarius' superiority is mostly in the mind.
Blind and double blind testing consistently fails to demonstrate it.
The bottom line is that a Strad sounds great,
when you know that it is a Strad,
There no doubt in my mind that all (or at least most) Stradivarius
violins sound great. Are they all better than all their competitors?
Probably not. There have been lots of other great violin-makers, some
contemporary with Stradivarius, some much more recent.
Much the same is true of many other things: makers of other musical
instruments, literature, music, painting, etc.
...wine...
--
Jerry Friedman
Ken Blake
2021-02-01 18:52:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari
instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have
been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that
read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does
not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The
reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
Yes, but the Stradivarius' superiority is mostly in the mind.
Blind and double blind testing consistently fails to demonstrate it.
The bottom line is that a Strad sounds great,
when you know that it is a Strad,
There no doubt in my mind that all (or at least most) Stradivarius
violins sound great. Are they all better than all their competitors?
Probably not. There have been lots of other great violin-makers, some
contemporary with Stradivarius, some much more recent.
Much the same is true of many other things: makers of other musical
instruments, literature, music, painting, etc.
...wine...
Yes.
--
Ken
J. J. Lodder
2021-02-01 22:15:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[-]
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Ken Blake
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
Yes, but the Stradivarius' superiority is mostly in the mind.
Blind and double blind testing consistently fails to demonstrate it.
The bottom line is that a Strad sounds great,
when you know that it is a Strad,
There no doubt in my mind that all (or at least most) Stradivarius
violins sound great. Are they all better than all their competitors?
Probably not. There have been lots of other great violin-makers, some
contemporary with Stradivarius, some much more recent.
Much the same is true of many other things: makers of other musical
instruments, literature, music, painting, etc.
...wine...
Yes, even Rembrandt paintings, [1]

Jan

[1] The number of 'known' ones decreased by a factor ten or so
over the last hundred years, iirc.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-02-02 07:55:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
[-]
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Ken Blake
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Ken Blake
Since I don't think I've heard a Stradivarius cello, I have no opinion,
but I'm curious as to why you say thins. I would expect them to be very
good, even if not as good as his violins.
Yes, but the Stradivarius' superiority is mostly in the mind.
Blind and double blind testing consistently fails to demonstrate it.
The bottom line is that a Strad sounds great,
when you know that it is a Strad,
There no doubt in my mind that all (or at least most) Stradivarius
violins sound great. Are they all better than all their competitors?
Probably not. There have been lots of other great violin-makers, some
contemporary with Stradivarius, some much more recent.
Much the same is true of many other things: makers of other musical
instruments, literature, music, painting, etc.
...wine...
Yes, even Rembrandt paintings, [1]
Jan
[1] The number of 'known' ones decreased by a factor ten or so
over the last hundred years, iirc.
The Mayor of Paris once (1950s, probably, but I can't cite a source)
commented that ten litres of Beaujolais were drunk every year in Paris
for every litre produced in Beaujolais.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
musika
2021-01-17 23:29:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari
instruments (harps, guitars, violas, cellos, violins)
survive, thousands of violins have been made in tribute to
Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label
does not confirm that the instrument is a genuine work of
Stradivari.[57]" The reference is to the Encyclopedia
Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a
Friday cello or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above
average.
My made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da
gambas (violas da gamba?).
Weird typo, sorry. That should be "he," of course, not "my."
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Well, they certainly converted one of their earlier gambas into a cello.
--
Ray
UK
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-18 16:24:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sam Plusnet
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
That's why he moved to Lake Wobegon.
Post by Sam Plusnet
He made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Hey!

Casals gave himself grief by assuming that all the Suites were intended
for the cello.
J. J. Lodder
2021-01-31 11:17:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sam Plusnet
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
That's why he moved to Lake Wobegon.
Post by Sam Plusnet
He made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Hey!
Casals gave himself grief by assuming that all the Suites were intended
for the cello.
And not just himself. All other cellists after him have felt
that they should be able to do it too.

But not in the way Casals did it.
Many others have been following the HIP style [1]
introduced by Anner Bylsma, (yes Dutch, do rant again)

Jan
--
[1] For Historically Informed performance.
Bylsma even wrote a book about it.
<https://www.amazon.com/Fencing-Magdalena-Autograph-Violoncello-Sebastian/dp/0244451001>
Some scientific research on it at
<https://www.researchgate.net/figure/b-Bylsma-1992-HIP-Rhythmic-Flexibility-in-Prelude-bars-1-12-Nominal-projected-pulse_fig1_279367005>
This is Bylsma playing, with rythmic flexibility,
compared to just playing the notes according to the score.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-31 14:40:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Sam Plusnet
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
That's why he moved to Lake Wobegon.
Post by Sam Plusnet
He made cellos, but as far as I know, he never made viola da gambas
(violas da gamba?).
Perhaps he did make a few, but they worked better as firewood than as
musical instruments.
Hey!
Casals gave himself grief by assuming that all the Suites were intended
for the cello.
And not just himself. All other cellists after him have felt
that they should be able to do it too.
But not in the way Casals did it.
Many others have been following the HIP style [1]
introduced by Anner Bylsma, (yes Dutch, do rant again)
As I noted recently, your knowledge of classical music is
less than nil. Do you really think Bylsma was playing HIP
cello, and viol, before (the Austrian) Harnoncourt?

For that matter, John Hsu, professor at Cornell when I got
there in 1968, was already a gamba virtuoso.
Quinn C
2021-01-18 15:17:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba. They can't all have been above average.
Is a Friday cello what Germans would call a Monday model?

Does the difference tell us something about work culture?
--
- It's the title search for the Rachel property.
Guess who owns it?
- Tell me it's not that bastard Donald Trump.
-- Gilmore Girls, S02E08 (2001)
Bebercito
2021-01-18 19:53:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba.
Has a prawn been raped?
Post by Sam Plusnet
They can't all have been above average.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-18 21:30:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bebercito
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Wikipedia says, "While only about 650 original Stradivari instruments (harps,
guitars, violas, cellos, violins) survive, thousands of violins have been made
in tribute to Stradivari, copying his model and bearing labels that read
"Stradivarius" on them. The presence of a Stradivarius label does not confirm
that the instrument is a genuine work of Stradivari.[57]" The reference is
to the Encyclopedia Smithsonian, whatever that is (at the Wayback
Machine).
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba.
Has a prawn been raped?
That's a leg-viola. You might have seen the French word "jambe."
Quinn C
2021-01-18 22:36:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bebercito
Post by Sam Plusnet
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba.
Has a prawn been raped?
I wouldn't call it rape, but many would certainly consider the
happenings in "The Taming of the Shrimp" abusive these days.
--
... she didn't exactly approve of the military. She didn't
exactly disapprove, either; she just made it plain that she
thought there were better things for intelligent human beings
to do with their lives. -- L. McMaster Bujold, Memory
Bebercito
2021-01-19 01:19:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Bebercito
Post by Sam Plusnet
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a Friday cello
or viola de gamba.
Has a prawn been raped?
I wouldn't call it rape, but many would certainly consider the
happenings in "The Taming of the Shrimp" abusive these days.
A shrewed remark indeed!
Post by Quinn C
--
... she didn't exactly approve of the military. She didn't
exactly disapprove, either; she just made it plain that she
thought there were better things for intelligent human beings
to do with their lives. -- L. McMaster Bujold, Memory
CDB
2021-01-19 13:57:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Le dimanche 17 janvier 2021 à 20:42:57 UTC+1, Sam Plusnet a écrit
Post by Sam Plusnet
I refuse to believe that Mr Stradivarius never turned out a
Friday cello
or viola de gamba.
Has a prawn been raped?
I wouldn't call it rape, but many would certainly consider the
happenings in "The Taming of the Shrimp" abusive these days.
AKA "Rigoletto"? Un babbino poco fa.
charles
2021-01-17 09:57:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
I had a work colleague whose hobby was old clocks. He used to tell novice
bedders at auctions that the best ones were those where Mr Fugit had put
his name: Tempus Fugit.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Dingbat
2021-01-17 10:38:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
I had a work colleague whose hobby was old clocks. He used to tell novice
bedders at auctions that the best ones were those where Mr Fugit had put
his name: Tempus Fugit.
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it literally means "time flees".*


* or even more literally, "time escapes" though it can't be caught like other fugitives.


+ time waits for no one

Peter Moylan
2021-01-17 11:36:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-01-17 16:06:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Ken Blake
2021-01-17 16:14:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
--
Ken
Jonathan Harston
2021-01-17 16:35:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I think in English you would use "after". For example, Gibbard's "Price of
Soverignty" cartoon "after Zac", Rendezvous in Helsinki "after Low", etc.
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 17:48:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Harston
I think in English you would use "after". For example, Gibbard's "Price of
Soverignty" cartoon "after Zac", Rendezvous in Helsinki "after Low", etc.
"In the style of" is also available, as in Kreisler's Praeludium and Allegro
"in the style of Pugnani".
--
Jerry Friedman
Paul Wolff
2021-01-17 19:21:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021, at 09:48:33, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jonathan Harston
I think in English you would use "after". For example, Gibbard's "Price of
Soverignty" cartoon "after Zac", Rendezvous in Helsinki "after Low", etc.
"In the style of" is also available, as in Kreisler's Praeludium and Allegro
"in the style of Pugnani".
#2 daughter's cello is, with honest ambition, "Copy of Stradivari, made
in Korea".
--
Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2021-01-17 20:17:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jonathan Harston
I think in English you would use "after". For example, Gibbard's "Price of
Soverignty" cartoon "after Zac", Rendezvous in Helsinki "after Low", etc.
"In the style of" is also available, as in Kreisler's Praeludium and Allegro
"in the style of Pugnani".
Is that from after Kreisler got caught passing off his own compositions
as by Paganini etc.?
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 21:05:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jonathan Harston
I think in English you would use "after". For example, Gibbard's "Price of
Soverignty" cartoon "after Zac", Rendezvous in Helsinki "after Low", etc.
"In the style of" is also available, as in Kreisler's Praeludium and Allegro
"in the style of Pugnani".
Is that from after Kreisler got caught passing off his own compositions
as by Paganini etc.?
Yes, though I believe all the "victims" were earlier than Paganini.

(According to the Wikiparticle on Kreisler, he did rewrite the first
movement of Paganini's Violin Concerto in D, but he could hardly have
hoped to pass that off as the original.)
--
Jerry Friedman
RH Draney
2021-01-17 20:57:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jonathan Harston
I think in English you would use "after". For example, Gibbard's "Price of
Soverignty" cartoon "after Zac", Rendezvous in Helsinki "after Low", etc.
Leading to jokes like "Van Gogh, after several pints"....r
Quinn C
2021-01-17 23:35:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
I think apples and oranges fly much better.
--
They spend so much time fussing about my identity
that I really shouldn't have to bother with it
myself at all.
-- Margaret Atwood, The Edible Woman, p.223
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-01-18 08:28:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 23:35:13 GMT, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
I think apples and oranges fly much better.
Yeah a lot of them need tracks:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_banana
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Quinn C
2021-01-18 15:17:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
I think apples and oranges fly much better.
Sorry, I forgot I'm not supposed to compare those.
--
Americans are not that comfortable with being uncomfortable.
-- Veronica Osorio
Sam Plusnet
2021-01-18 20:20:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
:-)
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
I think apples and oranges fly much better.
Sorry, I forgot I'm not supposed to compare those.
Nor should you show people how to tell the sex of an orange.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Paul Wolff
2021-01-18 20:58:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
I think apples and oranges fly much better.
Sorry, I forgot I'm not supposed to compare those.
Nor should you show people how to tell the sex of an orange.
But wait till you get to the love of /three/ oranges. Ooh!
--
Paul
Quinn C
2021-01-18 22:36:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
I think apples and oranges fly much better.
Sorry, I forgot I'm not supposed to compare those.
Nor should you show people how to tell the sex of an orange.
But wait till you get to the love of /three/ oranges. Ooh!
Poly-Orangery?
--
- It's the title search for the Rachel property.
Guess who owns it?
- Tell me it's not that bastard Donald Trump.
-- Gilmore Girls, S02E08 (2001)
Tony Cooper
2021-01-18 23:46:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 18 Jan 2021 20:58:57 +0000, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 11:36:38 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
"tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
It's difficult to time fleas. They move too quickly.
It's all those arrows that they're after. They're really keen on them.
Fruit flies like a banana.
I think apples and oranges fly much better.
Sorry, I forgot I'm not supposed to compare those.
Nor should you show people how to tell the sex of an orange.
But wait till you get to the love of /three/ oranges. Ooh!
Would that be a ménage à trois of Navels?
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
CDB
2021-01-17 14:18:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
"Made this, created this, painted this, molded this"?
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on
the inside of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that
violin makers often used parts from broken violins, so that those
words only apply to the back of the instrument.
I had a work colleague whose hobby was old clocks. He used to tell
novice bedders at auctions that the best ones were those where Mr
Fugit had put his name: Tempus Fugit.
My brother, an impatient man by nature, once said that to his son and
daughter-in-law to hurry them into his car. I had to translate it for
them: Papa fidget.

It seems to me that a cognate relationship to "fugere" is just possible.
:-) "tempus fugit" is sometimes translated as "time flies"+ but it
literally means "time flees".*
* or even more literally, "time escapes" though it can't be caught like other fugitives.
+ time waits for no one http://youtu.be/vC0Qt1lvLq8
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2021-01-17 13:50:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 09:57:21 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
I had a work colleague whose hobby was old clocks. He used to tell novice
bedders at auctions that the best ones were those where Mr Fugit had put
his name: Tempus Fugit.
"novice bedders"? !
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
charles
2021-01-17 14:28:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 09:57:21 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the
inside of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers
often used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply
to the back of the instrument.
I had a work colleague whose hobby was old clocks. He used to tell novice
bedders at auctions that the best ones were those where Mr Fugit had put
his name: Tempus Fugit.
"novice bedders"? !
should be "bidders"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Paul Wolff
2021-01-17 19:24:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021, at 13:50:09, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 17 Jan 2021 09:57:21 +0000 (GMT), charles
Post by charles
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
I had a work colleague whose hobby was old clocks. He used to tell novice
bedders at auctions that the best ones were those where Mr Fugit had put
his name: Tempus Fugit.
"novice bedders"? !
in Novas Cotia, perhaps?
--
Paul
J. J. Lodder
2021-01-17 10:56:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
Certainly not.
A bare back of a genuine Strad is worth -a lot- of money,

Jan
J. J. Lodder
2021-01-17 15:58:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
Certainly not.
A bare back of a genuine Strad is worth -a lot- of money,
[continued]
Remember seeing a documentary about someone who builds cellos.
Even a freshly sawn block of wood from the forests
near where Stradivarius got his wood
probably costs more than your son's violin,

Jan
Ken Blake
2021-01-17 16:03:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Dingbat
On copies of art/ sculpture from the middle ages, one these terms was
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
I was most impressed to see the words "Stradivarius fecit" on the inside
of my son's violin. Eventually I discovered that violin makers often
used parts from broken violins, so that those words only apply to the
back of the instrument.
For more modern instruments, I'd expect something akin to a patent or
copyright statement.
Inside my main guitar, a Yamaha G-225, there is a piece of paper saying
something about either the guitar or the company, but my eyes aren't
good enough to figure it out.
I think all (almost all? perhaps not the very cheap no-name ones)
guitars, and probably almost all violins have a similar label inside.
What used to be my main guitar, also a Yamaha, a G-255 SII, has such a
label and my new main guitar has one that says "Luthier Yulong Guo." I'm
too lazy to dig my Martin D-35 out of the closet and open the case, but
I'm almost sure that also has such a label.
--
Ken
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 04:29:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
Dingbat
2021-01-17 06:47:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
Bebercito
2021-01-17 07:53:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
Dingbat
2021-01-17 10:28:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bebercito
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
Jerry is literally correct. But I understand that there was an understood convention that it meant: so and so made the original of this work. There's no such convention in English. "Raphael painted it" would mean that Raphael himself painted the work, not that he painted the original that the work is a copy of. That's why I'm asking how it is expressed in English. If faciebat be an improvement on fecit as it apparently seems, how is faciebat expressed in English?
Paul Carmichael
2021-01-17 12:42:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Bebercito
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
Jerry is literally correct. But I understand that there was an understood convention that it meant: so and so made the original of this work. There's no such convention in English. "Raphael painted it" would mean that Raphael himself painted the work, not that he painted the original that the work is a copy of. That's why I'm asking how it is expressed in English. If faciebat be an improvement on fecit as it apparently seems, how is faciebat expressed in English?
"Based on an original work by..."

A bit like Star Trek.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/elpatio
RH Draney
2021-01-17 21:02:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
"Based on an original work by..."
A bit like Star Trek.
I'm suddenly reminded of the credit in the first Blackadder series "with
additional dialogue by William Shakespeare"....r
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 15:33:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bebercito
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
I'll take your word that "faciebat" wasn't good Latin in that context, but
it's what Stradivari put on his instruments.
--
Jerry Friedman
Ken Blake
2021-01-17 15:47:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Bebercito
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
I'll take your word that "faciebat" wasn't good Latin in that context, but
it's what Stradivari put on his instruments.
It was about 58 years ago that I built a harpsichord (from a Zuckerman
kit). I had wanted to put "K. Blake Fecit" on the nameboard, but I never
did.
--
Ken
Dingbat
2021-01-19 10:11:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Bebercito
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
I'll take your word that "faciebat" wasn't good Latin in that context, but
it's what Stradivari put on his instruments.
It was about 58 years ago that I built a harpsichord (from a Zuckerman
kit). I had wanted to put "K. Blake Fecit" on the nameboard, but I never
did.
Can it also be made by modifying a grand piano, or baby grand?

Making a new harpsichord using some parts from an old one was called ravalement.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_harpsichord

I've heard Don McLean's Vincent accompanied by a variety of stringed instruments.

One of them was an Autoharp, a kind of zither. Not a harpsichord; I don't know whether it's generally considered a string instrument.

Paradoxically, a Stringer was a position in an Army whereas one who works on hand operated stringed instruments is a Luthier.
RH Draney
2021-01-19 10:28:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
I've heard Don McLean's Vincent accompanied by a variety of stringed instruments.
One of them was an Autoharp, a kind of zither. Not a harpsichord; I don't know whether it's generally considered a string instrument.
If it's not, I know some guzhengists who are left out in the cold....r
Bebercito
2021-01-17 18:32:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Bebercito
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
I'll take your word that "faciebat" wasn't good Latin in that context, but
it's what Stradivari put on his instruments.
Then, by using the imperfect rather than the perfect, he may have wanted
to stress that it took him a long, continued effort to make his instruments.
(I guess the nuance is hard to render concisely in English.)
Post by Jerry Friedman
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 21:06:54 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
The imperfect "faciebat" doesn't suggest so anyway. Rather, it implies
that Stradivari _was making_ (the closest English translation) such
instruments as the one concerned in that given year. OTOH, the
perfect "fecit" could be considered a claim that he did make the
instrument.
I'll take your word that "faciebat" wasn't good Latin in that context, but
it's what Stradivari put on his instruments.
Then, by using the imperfect rather than the perfect, he may have wanted
to stress that it took him a long, continued effort to make his instruments.
(I guess the nuance is hard to render concisely in English.)
OK, thanks.
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 15:44:38 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
If that's the situation you're talking about, I'd translate "Antonius
Stradivarius Cremonensis Fecit Anno 1711" as "Made by Antonio
Stradivari of Cremona in the year 1711" and add an explanation of
the custom of labeling (supposed) copies that way. In general I'm
not in favor of cramming an explanatory note into a translation, and
it seems particularly unjustified here in any context I can think of.

If someone would rather use "Stradivarius" than Stradivari" or
"made it" (o maybe even just "made") than "Made by", I wouldn't argue.
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-17 15:50:48 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
"Made by [name]", etc.?
--
Jerry Friedman
It's a replica that bears such a label, to credit the author of the original.
So, "made by" wouldn't be right.
If that's the situation you're talking about, I'd translate "Antonius
Stradivarius Cremonensis Fecit Anno 1711"
*Faciebat
--
Jerry Friedman
Quinn C
2021-01-17 23:33:39 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
FECIT, INVENIT, PINXIT, SCULPSIT
Are there English replacements for these terms?
If I saw "PINXIT" out of context, these days I'd read it as the gays
leaving the union.
--
In the old days, the complaints about the passing of the
golden age were much more sophisticated.
-- James Hogg in alt.usage.english
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