Discussion:
interesting Newfie accent
(too old to reply)
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-10 15:31:30 UTC
Permalink
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.

In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-01-10 16:14:42 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".

The creatures became stranded after nearby waters suddenly froze
over last week, preventing their return to the ocean.

Experts say the speed at which the bay froze over may have
disorientated the animals and caused them to move inland instead of
towards open waters.
....
Roddickton-Bide Arm sits on a major seal migration route and people
there are accustomed to seeing the creatures.

On Tuesday, the police said they had safely returned a seal to the
ocean but warned against approaching them.

"[They] may appear to be friendly in nature, [but] it is very
dangerous to approach or attempt to capture animals without proper
equipment," a Facebook post read.

From:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-46818238
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Cheryl
2019-01-10 16:30:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
The creatures became stranded after nearby waters suddenly froze
over last week, preventing their return to the ocean.
Experts say the speed at which the bay froze over may have
disorientated the animals and caused them to move inland instead of
towards open waters.
....
Roddickton-Bide Arm sits on a major seal migration route and people
there are accustomed to seeing the creatures.
On Tuesday, the police said they had safely returned a seal to the
ocean but warned against approaching them.
"[They] may appear to be friendly in nature, [but] it is very
dangerous to approach or attempt to capture animals without proper
equipment," a Facebook post read.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-46818238
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.

Seals often do come ashore, just not in such great numbers and at a time
of year when food is limited. I'm glad the article warned about
approaching them - they aren't cute cuddly toys, they're wild animals
and I'm told they bite. "The Wildlife" (that branch of the provincial
government dealing with wild animals) is who should be notified when one
sees a wild animal in distress, although of course you can also call the
police. Sometimes animals like polar bears who wander out of their usual
range are trapped and relocated, but in this case, the numbers seem
extremely high for that approach to be used.

Sometimes members of the public approach bears, too, which is also not a
good idea. Maybe the same people who want a selfie with a bear think
seals are smaller and cuter so why not?

Also in the local news - someone dumped unwanted kittens in a snowbank.
Fortunately, they were rescued and taken to shelters.
--
Cheryl
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-10 16:40:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
The creatures became stranded after nearby waters suddenly froze
over last week, preventing their return to the ocean.
Experts say the speed at which the bay froze over may have
disorientated the animals and caused them to move inland instead of
towards open waters.
....
Roddickton-Bide Arm sits on a major seal migration route and people
there are accustomed to seeing the creatures.
On Tuesday, the police said they had safely returned a seal to the
ocean but warned against approaching them.
"[They] may appear to be friendly in nature, [but] it is very
dangerous to approach or attempt to capture animals without proper
equipment," a Facebook post read.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-46818238
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
Seals often do come ashore, just not in such great numbers and at a time
of year when food is limited. I'm glad the article warned about
approaching them - they aren't cute cuddly toys, they're wild animals
and I'm told they bite. "The Wildlife" (that branch of the provincial
government dealing with wild animals) is who should be notified when one
sees a wild animal in distress, although of course you can also call the
police. Sometimes animals like polar bears who wander out of their usual
range are trapped and relocated, but in this case, the numbers seem
extremely high for that approach to be used.
She referred several times to "the F&O," Fisheries and Oceans, ministry,
which I gathered is national. She said that when it's whales or dolphins,
they swing into action immediately to protect them, but they're only now
starting to try to bring the seals home after a week.
Post by Cheryl
Sometimes members of the public approach bears, too, which is also not a
good idea. Maybe the same people who want a selfie with a bear think
seals are smaller and cuter so why not?
Also in the local news - someone dumped unwanted kittens in a snowbank.
Fortunately, they were rescued and taken to shelters.
We had one of those just last night! No snow yet, though. It passed just
north of here.
Cheryl
2019-01-10 16:53:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
The creatures became stranded after nearby waters suddenly froze
over last week, preventing their return to the ocean.
Experts say the speed at which the bay froze over may have
disorientated the animals and caused them to move inland instead of
towards open waters.
....
Roddickton-Bide Arm sits on a major seal migration route and people
there are accustomed to seeing the creatures.
On Tuesday, the police said they had safely returned a seal to the
ocean but warned against approaching them.
"[They] may appear to be friendly in nature, [but] it is very
dangerous to approach or attempt to capture animals without proper
equipment," a Facebook post read.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-46818238
Post by Peter T. Daniels
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
Seals often do come ashore, just not in such great numbers and at a time
of year when food is limited. I'm glad the article warned about
approaching them - they aren't cute cuddly toys, they're wild animals
and I'm told they bite. "The Wildlife" (that branch of the provincial
government dealing with wild animals) is who should be notified when one
sees a wild animal in distress, although of course you can also call the
police. Sometimes animals like polar bears who wander out of their usual
range are trapped and relocated, but in this case, the numbers seem
extremely high for that approach to be used.
She referred several times to "the F&O," Fisheries and Oceans, ministry,
which I gathered is national. She said that when it's whales or dolphins,
they swing into action immediately to protect them, but they're only now
starting to try to bring the seals home after a week.
Yes, the feds do have a role in the protection of animals -
specifically, marine animals. There is a long history of conflict
between the province and the federal government over decisions made
regarding marine animals, especially fish. My first instinct, if I
needed help with a wild animal, would be to call the provincial lot.
Maybe the mayor is right, and the feds aren't that interested in seals -
so numerous and commonplace.
Quinn C
2019-01-10 17:20:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
She referred several times to "the F&O," Fisheries and Oceans, ministry,
DFO, Department of ...

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisheries_and_Oceans_Canada>

In the audio clip I heard, at some point she says "the nearest DFO",
where it couldn't be "the FO".
--
Certain writers assert very decidedly that no pronouns are
needed beyond those we already possess, but this is simply a
dogmatic opinion, unsupported by the facts.
-- Findlay (OH) Jeffersonian (1875)
Quinn C
2019-01-10 17:20:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
[...]
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
Here's one - not sure if it's the same interview, but it's likely:

<https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1423342659640>

Starting at around 1 minute.
--
If Helen Keller is alone in the forest and falls down, does she
make a sound?
Cheryl
2019-01-10 17:39:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
[...]
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
<https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1423342659640>
Starting at around 1 minute.
Her accent sounds quite normal to me. Perhaps she speaks a bit fast for
anyone who isn't from around here - that's a common complaint about the
way we speak.
--
Cheryl
HVS
2019-01-10 17:50:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of
Roddington, NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who
somehow got disconnected from the edge of the ice where they
normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
[...]
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
<https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1423342659640>
Starting at around 1 minute.
Her accent sounds quite normal to me. Perhaps she speaks a bit fast for
anyone who isn't from around here - that's a common complaint about the
way we speak.
ObAUE (and following on from my query about "Eskimo"), ISTR that 40 or 50
years ago, the term "Newfie" -- when used by anyone other than a
Newfoundlander -- was considered, shall we say, unsuitable for polite
company.

Things might have changed since then, of course, but I'm fairly certain
that was the case when I was working in Ottawa in the early 1970s.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Cheryl
2019-01-10 17:59:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of
Roddington, NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who
somehow got disconnected from the edge of the ice where they
normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
[...]
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
<https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1423342659640>
Starting at around 1 minute.
Her accent sounds quite normal to me. Perhaps she speaks a bit fast for
anyone who isn't from around here - that's a common complaint about the
way we speak.
ObAUE (and following on from my query about "Eskimo"), ISTR that 40 or 50
years ago, the term "Newfie" -- when used by anyone other than a
Newfoundlander -- was considered, shall we say, unsuitable for polite
company.
Things might have changed since then, of course, but I'm fairly certain
that was the case when I was working in Ottawa in the early 1970s.
I consider it (or "Newf") rude, but I don't bother to make a fuss about
it any more. There were always some Newfoundlanders who thought it was
just fine. Non-Newfoundlanders can't be expected to know that it is
often considered offensive.
--
Cheryl
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-10 18:10:47 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 10:59:30 AM UTC-7, Cheryl P wrote:
...
Post by Cheryl
Post by HVS
ObAUE (and following on from my query about "Eskimo"), ISTR that 40 or 50
years ago, the term "Newfie" -- when used by anyone other than a
Newfoundlander -- was considered, shall we say, unsuitable for polite
company.
Things might have changed since then, of course, but I'm fairly certain
that was the case when I was working in Ottawa in the early 1970s.
I consider it (or "Newf") rude, but I don't bother to make a fuss about
it any more. There were always some Newfoundlanders who thought it was
just fine. Non-Newfoundlanders can't be expected to know that it is
often considered offensive.
We can if we've heard the jokes.
--
Jerry Friedman
There were these three Newfies...
charles
2019-01-10 18:17:39 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, January 10, 2019 at 10:59:30 AM UTC-7, Cheryl P wrote: ...
Post by Cheryl
Post by HVS
ObAUE (and following on from my query about "Eskimo"), ISTR that 40
or 50 years ago, the term "Newfie" -- when used by anyone other than
a Newfoundlander -- was considered, shall we say, unsuitable for
polite company.
Things might have changed since then, of course, but I'm fairly
certain that was the case when I was working in Ottawa in the early
1970s.
I consider it (or "Newf") rude, but I don't bother to make a fuss about
it any more. There were always some Newfoundlanders who thought it was
just fine. Non-Newfoundlanders can't be expected to know that it is
often considered offensive.
We can if we've heard the jokes.
They are the same jokes world-wide with different victims
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
HVS
2019-01-10 18:31:07 UTC
Permalink
-snip -
Post by Cheryl
Post by HVS
ObAUE (and following on from my query about "Eskimo"), ISTR that 40 or 50
years ago, the term "Newfie" -- when used by anyone other than a
Newfoundlander -- was considered, shall we say, unsuitable for polite
company.
Things might have changed since then, of course, but I'm fairly certain
that was the case when I was working in Ottawa in the early 1970s.
I consider it (or "Newf") rude, but I don't bother to make a fuss about
it any more. There were always some Newfoundlanders who thought it was
just fine. Non-Newfoundlanders can't be expected to know that it is
often considered offensive.
Thanks; I knew it could be complex. I learned of it as a sensitive
issue from a colleague in a government office (where it would have
been inappropriate).
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-10 20:42:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
Post by HVS
Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of
Roddington, NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who
somehow got disconnected from the edge of the ice where they
normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
[...]
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
<https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1423342659640>
Starting at around 1 minute.
Her accent sounds quite normal to me.
;-)
Post by Cheryl
Post by HVS
Post by Cheryl
Perhaps she speaks a bit fast for
anyone who isn't from around here - that's a common complaint about the
way we speak.
ObAUE (and following on from my query about "Eskimo"), ISTR that 40 or 50
years ago, the term "Newfie" -- when used by anyone other than a
Newfoundlander -- was considered, shall we say, unsuitable for polite
company.
Things might have changed since then, of course, but I'm fairly certain
that was the case when I was working in Ottawa in the early 1970s.
I consider it (or "Newf") rude, but I don't bother to make a fuss about
it any more. There were always some Newfoundlanders who thought it was
just fine. Non-Newfoundlanders can't be expected to know that it is
often considered offensive.
It's cute! Like a giant puppy!

Quinn C
2019-01-10 18:38:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
Post by Quinn C
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 07:31:30 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
The place is "Roddickton-Bide Arm, Newfoundland".
[...]
I didn't see the link for the interview, though.
<https://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1423342659640>
Starting at around 1 minute.
Her accent sounds quite normal to me.
In the beginning, I don't recognize anything specifically Newfoundland.
Later, it comes through occasionally, but not consistently. But then,
I'm not good at this kind of judgment.
Post by Cheryl
Perhaps she speaks a bit fast for
anyone who isn't from around here - that's a common complaint about the
way we speak.
I didn't know that. It's actually true of the young woman who recently
joined our choir. The other member that I know is from Newfoundland
speaks more slowly than most people, but she's 70 and has been living
in Montreal all her adult life (and married a great Dane.)
--
We say, 'If any lady or gentleman shall buy this article _____ shall
have it for five dollars.' The blank may be filled with he, she, it,
or they; or in any other manner; and yet the form of the expression
will be too vulgar to be uttered. -- Wkly Jrnl of Commerce (1839)
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-10 16:30:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
When I was a tourist on the west coast of Newfoundland twenty years
or so ago, what I mostly (as I understood it) was a very fronted vowel
in "about" and such, quite different from the usual Canadian raising
and from the actual "aboot" that I'd just been hearing on Cape Breton.
"Cot" and "caught" seemed to be merged and have the /a/ of the great
city of Chacaga. (Which as far as I can tell has spread from the
'burbs into Chicago, at least among a lot of young people.)

De interdentals sounded completely stopped to me, but I tought dey
were alveolar as usual in North America. "Boy" and "bye" were
merged to something like [VI], as in "I's de b'y dat bails de boat."
FACE and GOAT tended toward being monophthongal, as in much of Canada.

I believe Cheryl has told us that kind of accent is decreasing.
--
Jerry Friedman
Cheryl
2019-01-10 16:34:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
When I was a tourist on the west coast of Newfoundland twenty years
or so ago, what I mostly (as I understood it) was a very fronted vowel
in "about" and such, quite different from the usual Canadian raising
and from the actual "aboot" that I'd just been hearing on Cape Breton.
"Cot" and "caught" seemed to be merged and have the /a/ of the great
city of Chacaga. (Which as far as I can tell has spread from the
'burbs into Chicago, at least among a lot of young people.)
De interdentals sounded completely stopped to me, but I tought dey
were alveolar as usual in North America. "Boy" and "bye" were
merged to something like [VI], as in "I's de b'y dat bails de boat."
FACE and GOAT tended toward being monophthongal, as in much of Canada.
I believe Cheryl has told us that kind of accent is decreasing.
Local accents are decreasing. They were also never the same in every
part of the province. The Avalon and Southern Shore (not the South
Coast) were heavily influenced by the Irish accent. The Northeast coast
varied somewhat, too. I've forgotten a lot of the details - in which
fishing village everyone misplaced their aitches, for example.
--
Cheryl
CDB
2019-01-10 19:41:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of
Roddington, NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals
who somehow got disconnected from the edge of the ice where they
normally hang out.
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has
Canadian raising in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except
in "all," where it seems to be protected by the dark [l]), but it
doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger, because it's also quite
fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat stopped, but I
couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side
Chicago, the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were
a couple other features but I was driving and couldn't take
notes.
When I was a tourist on the west coast of Newfoundland twenty
years or so ago, what I mostly (as I understood it) was a very
fronted vowel in "about" and such, quite different from the usual
Canadian raising and from the actual "aboot" that I'd just been
hearing on Cape Breton. "Cot" and "caught" seemed to be merged and
have the /a/ of the great city of Chacaga. (Which as far as I can
tell has spread from the 'burbs into Chicago, at least among a lot
of young people.)
De interdentals sounded completely stopped to me, but I tought dey
were alveolar as usual in North America. "Boy" and "bye" were
merged to something like [VI], as in "I's de b'y dat bails de
boat." FACE and GOAT tended toward being monophthongal, as in much
of Canada.
I believe Cheryl has told us that kind of accent is decreasing.
Local accents are decreasing. They were also never the same in every
part of the province. The Avalon and Southern Shore (not the South
Coast) were heavily influenced by the Irish accent. The Northeast
coast varied somewhat, too. I've forgotten a lot of the details - in
which fishing village everyone misplaced their aitches, for example.
I was in St John's in the '90s, for hearings on the decline of the cod
fishery, and I heard witnesses from all over the island. There were
accents that I would have thought were from Ireland, New England, Nova
Scotia (South Shore) and Cape Breton. By the end of the day, I was
answering them in an Ottawa Valley (Irish-influenced) acccent.

I was alone with a camera crew and the telewitnesses. "Let them lynch
the clerk", my masters thought. As I had expected, they were friendly
enough to me, although very bitter about the effect of dragging on the
seabed. Some of the members got an earful.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-10 16:36:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
When I was a tourist on the west coast of Newfoundland twenty years
or so ago, what I mostly (as I understood it) was a very fronted vowel
in "about" and such, quite different from the usual Canadian raising
and from the actual "aboot" that I'd just been hearing on Cape Breton.
"Cot" and "caught" seemed to be merged and have the /a/ of the great
city of Chacaga. (Which as far as I can tell has spread from the
'burbs into Chicago, at least among a lot of young people.)
Oh, I hope not -- when the Chicago and New York choruses did a joint
concert in 1982, the opening medley included "Chicago, Chicago, that
toddlin' town," and it was hilarious to hear the Chicago chorus sing
"ChicOgo" and the New York chorus echo it with "ChicAgo." It's like
Nevada/Nevahda or Wi-sconsin/Wis-consin -- natives say it one way,
outsiders say it another.
Post by Jerry Friedman
De interdentals sounded completely stopped to me, but I tought dey
were alveolar as usual in North America. "Boy" and "bye" were
merged to something like [VI], as in "I's de b'y dat bails de boat."
FACE and GOAT tended toward being monophthongal, as in much of Canada.
I believe Cheryl has told us that kind of accent is decreasing.
I didn't look at a map to see how rural the town of 999 residents is --
nor do I know how close Cheryl is to one of NL's urban metropoli (what
she describes seems more suburban than rural, usually).
Cheryl
2019-01-10 16:46:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This morning the BBC had an extended interview with the mayor of Roddington,
NL, which is currently hosting some 40 harp seals who somehow got disconnected
from the edge of the ice where they normally hang out.
In some ways her accent was hyper-Canadian -- she clearly has Canadian raising
in e.g. "about" -- but she unrounds [O] (except in "all," where it seems to be
protected by the dark [l]), but it doesn't seem to be a cot/caught merger,
because it's also quite fronted. The interdentals seemed to be somewhat
stopped, but I couldn't tell whether they were dental (as in South Side Chicago,
the accent that gave us "Da Bearss" on SNL). There were a couple other features
but I was driving and couldn't take notes.
When I was a tourist on the west coast of Newfoundland twenty years
or so ago, what I mostly (as I understood it) was a very fronted vowel
in "about" and such, quite different from the usual Canadian raising
and from the actual "aboot" that I'd just been hearing on Cape Breton.
"Cot" and "caught" seemed to be merged and have the /a/ of the great
city of Chacaga. (Which as far as I can tell has spread from the
'burbs into Chicago, at least among a lot of young people.)
Oh, I hope not -- when the Chicago and New York choruses did a joint
concert in 1982, the opening medley included "Chicago, Chicago, that
toddlin' town," and it was hilarious to hear the Chicago chorus sing
"ChicOgo" and the New York chorus echo it with "ChicAgo." It's like
Nevada/Nevahda or Wi-sconsin/Wis-consin -- natives say it one way,
outsiders say it another.
Post by Jerry Friedman
De interdentals sounded completely stopped to me, but I tought dey
were alveolar as usual in North America. "Boy" and "bye" were
merged to something like [VI], as in "I's de b'y dat bails de boat."
FACE and GOAT tended toward being monophthongal, as in much of Canada.
I believe Cheryl has told us that kind of accent is decreasing.
I didn't look at a map to see how rural the town of 999 residents is --
nor do I know how close Cheryl is to one of NL's urban metropoli (what
she describes seems more suburban than rural, usually).
I live in the capital city, St. John's, pretty near the centre of it,
and so not in a suburban area. But it's a small city. There are not a
lot of urban areas to pick from!

I've never been to Roddickton (now apparently combined with Bide Arm)
that I can recall, although some of my ancestors undoubtedly lived in
the general area around the tip of the Great Northern Peninsula. I grew
up in central NL, in a new town missing the traditional dialects, and
was then most closely connected to relatives living along the northeast
coast from, say, Trinity Bay to Notre Dame Bay.
--
Cheryl
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