Discussion:
coeur...so he did
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Spains Harden
2019-11-30 15:52:16 UTC
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The Irish accent is a very pleasant one, and one we hear a lot -
both in the horse racing on the TV and in the pubs in London.

Like the Scottish accent it is a confident accent that doesn't
seem to be dwindling - although I suppose it probably must be.
Several times this afternoon sentences of the form:

"He hit the fence very heavily, so he did".

One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the
English in a horse's name:

"Coeur..." what?
charles
2019-11-30 16:37:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Spains Harden
The Irish accent is a very pleasant one, and one we hear a lot -
both in the horse racing on the TV and in the pubs in London.
Like the Scottish accent it is a confident accent that doesn't
seem to be dwindling - although I suppose it probably must be.
"He hit the fence very heavily, so he did".
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the
"Coeur..." what?
The Irish Accent? - The Scottish accent? There are significant variation
of both across their respective countries
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-30 17:09:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Spains Harden
The Irish accent is a very pleasant one, and one we hear a lot -
both in the horse racing on the TV and in the pubs in London.
Like the Scottish accent it is a confident accent that doesn't
seem to be dwindling - although I suppose it probably must be.
"He hit the fence very heavily, so he did".
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the
"Coeur..." what?
The Irish Accent? - The Scottish accent? There are significant variation
of both across their respective countries
Once I participated in a discussion in which someone referred to a
Scottish accent. As it happened there were two Scottish people in the
room, one from Dundee, the other from Inverness, but they both had
"Scottish accents", about as different from one another as Geordie and
Cockney. Edinburgh and Glasgow are different again (though my
recollection is that Edinburgh and Inverness are reasonably similar).

I know less about Irish accents (despite my Irish mother), but I think
you're right there again. Belfast and Dublin are certainly quite
different, and I suspect that Belfast-Catholic and Belfast-Protestant
are also quite different.

In both countries I expect that there are significant differences
between city and countryside, as in England.
--
athel
Peter Young
2019-11-30 19:27:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Spains Harden
The Irish accent is a very pleasant one, and one we hear a lot -
both in the horse racing on the TV and in the pubs in London.
Like the Scottish accent it is a confident accent that doesn't
seem to be dwindling - although I suppose it probably must be.
"He hit the fence very heavily, so he did".
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the
"Coeur..." what?
The Irish Accent? - The Scottish accent? There are significant variation
of both across their respective countries
Once I participated in a discussion in which someone referred to a
Scottish accent. As it happened there were two Scottish people in the
room, one from Dundee, the other from Inverness, but they both had
"Scottish accents", about as different from one another as Geordie and
Cockney. Edinburgh and Glasgow are different again (though my
recollection is that Edinburgh and Inverness are reasonably similar).
I know less about Irish accents (despite my Irish mother), but I think
you're right there again. Belfast and Dublin are certainly quite
different, and I suspect that Belfast-Catholic and Belfast-Protestant
are also quite different.
The Northern Irish split between Catholic and Protestant dialects can be a
matter of life and death, as I mentioned elsethread.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In both countries I expect that there are significant differences
between city and countryside, as in England.
I don't think there's so much that sort of difference as there is in
England. however, the Cork accent is very different from the Dublin one.
The Arran Island accent sounded to me to be pore akin to the Hebridean
accent od Scots, which in turn has more than a tinge of Irish to me.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Spains Harden
2019-11-30 19:36:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Spains Harden
The Irish accent is a very pleasant one, and one we hear a lot -
both in the horse racing on the TV and in the pubs in London.
Like the Scottish accent it is a confident accent that doesn't
seem to be dwindling - although I suppose it probably must be.
"He hit the fence very heavily, so he did".
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the
"Coeur..." what?
The Irish Accent? - The Scottish accent? There are significant variation
of both across their respective countries
Once I participated in a discussion in which someone referred to a
Scottish accent. As it happened there were two Scottish people in the
room, one from Dundee, the other from Inverness, but they both had
"Scottish accents", about as different from one another as Geordie and
Cockney. Edinburgh and Glasgow are different again (though my
recollection is that Edinburgh and Inverness are reasonably similar).
I know less about Irish accents (despite my Irish mother), but I think
you're right there again. Belfast and Dublin are certainly quite
different, and I suspect that Belfast-Catholic and Belfast-Protestant
are also quite different.
The Northern Irish split between Catholic and Protestant dialects can be a
matter of life and death, as I mentioned elsethread.
This guy (who I posted just recently) seems to my ears to get the
difference just about right - but what do any of us know about
each others' accents?


Peter Moylan
2019-12-01 04:16:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Young
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In both countries I expect that there are significant differences
between city and countryside, as in England.
I don't think there's so much that sort of difference as there is in
England. however, the Cork accent is very different from the Dublin
one. The Arran Island accent sounded to me to be pore akin to the
Hebridean accent od Scots, which in turn has more than a tinge of
Irish to me.
I have a cousin in Kilkenny, so I have, and that's not so far from Cork,
but to my ears her accent is more Dublin than Cork.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Moylan
2019-12-01 04:17:53 UTC
Permalink
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the English
"Coeur..." what?
I'm afraid I was whooshed by the "coeur" reference. Can anyone explain?
I assume that it's not about a horse called Coeur de Lion.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
occam
2019-12-01 13:39:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the English
"Coeur..." what?
I'm afraid I was whooshed by the "coeur" reference. Can anyone explain?
I assume that it's not about a horse called Coeur de Lion.
Yes. Also, Coeur Sublime, Au Coeur, and I wager some others too...


https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/994454/au-coeur/form
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/1940564/coeur-sublime/form
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/994454/au-coeur/form

My money is on Coeur Sublime.
occam
2019-12-01 13:46:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the English
"Coeur..." what?
I'm afraid I was whooshed by the "coeur" reference. Can anyone explain?
I assume that it's not about a horse called Coeur de Lion.
Yes. Also, Coeur Sublime, Au Coeur, and I wager some others too...
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/994454/au-coeur/form
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/1940564/coeur-sublime/form
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/994454/au-coeur/form
My money is on Coeur Sublime.
Change of mind. 'Coeur Blimey' sounds like an English horse.

https://www.racingpost.com/news/we-think-the-world-of-him-family-firm-hoping-for-glory-with-coeur-blimey/319003
Spains Harden
2019-12-01 17:15:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
One expression that made me laugh was a wonderful sop to the English
"Coeur..." what?
I'm afraid I was whooshed by the "coeur" reference. Can anyone explain?
I assume that it's not about a horse called Coeur de Lion.
Yes. Also, Coeur Sublime, Au Coeur, and I wager some others too...
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/994454/au-coeur/form
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/1940564/coeur-sublime/form
https://www.racingpost.com/profile/horse/994454/au-coeur/form
My money is on Coeur Sublime.
Change of mind. 'Coeur Blimey' sounds like an English horse.
https://www.racingpost.com/news/we-think-the-world-of-him-family-firm-hoping-for-glory-with-coeur-blimey/319003
'Coeur Blimey' is an Irish horse and what a great name.

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