Discussion:
Abhominacioun (excitingly innovative)
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Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-01-21 19:20:24 UTC
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These are the opening sentences of a post at
The University of Leicester will stop teaching Geoffrey Chaucer's work
and other medieval literature in favour of modules on race and
sexuality, according to new proposals.
Management told the English department that courses on canonical works
will be dropped for modules “students expect” as part of plans now
under consultation.
Foundational texts like The Canterbury Tales and Anglo-Saxon epic
Beowulf would no longer be taught under proposals to scrap medieval
literature.
Instead the English faculty will be refocused to drop centuries of the
literary canon and deliver a “decolonised” curriculum devoted to
diversity.
Academics now facing redundancy were told via email: “The aim of our
proposals (is) to offer a suite of undergraduate degrees that provide
modules which students expect of an English degree.”
New modules described as “excitingly innovative” would cover: “A
chronological literary history, a selection of modules on race,
ethnicity, sexuality and diversity, a decolonised curriculum, and new
employability modules.”
For the moment I add no comment of my own, but I may add one later.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Peter Moylan
2021-01-22 00:20:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
These are the opening sentences of a post at
The University of Leicester will stop teaching Geoffrey Chaucer's
work and other medieval literature in favour of modules on race and
sexuality, according to new proposals.
Management told the English department that courses on canonical
works will be dropped for modules “students expect” as part of
plans now under consultation.
Foundational texts like The Canterbury Tales and Anglo-Saxon epic
Beowulf would no longer be taught under proposals to scrap medieval
literature.
Instead the English faculty will be refocused to drop centuries of
the literary canon and deliver a “decolonised” curriculum devoted
to diversity.
Academics now facing redundancy were told via email: “The aim of
our proposals (is) to offer a suite of undergraduate degrees that
provide modules which students expect of an English degree.”
New modules described as “excitingly innovative” would cover: “A
chronological literary history, a selection of modules on race,
ethnicity, sexuality and diversity, a decolonised curriculum, and
new employability modules.”
For the moment I add no comment of my own, but I may add one later.
I see that as being in the same basket as another unfortunate
development in UK universities: the politically motivated redefinition
of antisemitism, leading to the suppression of any commentary on settler
atrocities in Israel's occupied territories.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW
Arindam Banerjee
2021-01-22 09:29:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
These are the opening sentences of a post at
The University of Leicester will stop teaching Geoffrey Chaucer's work
and other medieval literature in favour of modules on race and
sexuality, according to new proposals.
Management told the English department that courses on canonical works
will be dropped for modules “students expect” as part of plans now
under consultation.
Foundational texts like The Canterbury Tales and Anglo-Saxon epic
Beowulf would no longer be taught under proposals to scrap medieval
literature.
Instead the English faculty will be refocused to drop centuries of the
literary canon and deliver a “decolonised” curriculum devoted to
diversity.
Academics now facing redundancy were told via email: “The aim of our
proposals (is) to offer a suite of undergraduate degrees that provide
modules which students expect of an English degree.”
New modules described as “excitingly innovative” would cover: “A
chronological literary history, a selection of modules on race,
ethnicity, sexuality and diversity, a decolonised curriculum, and new
employability modules.”
For the moment I add no comment of my own, but I may add one later.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
According to a RKNarayan character, that of a teacher of English Literature, nothing good in English Literature happened after the 19th century.
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