Discussion:
his friend's name
(too old to reply)
a***@gmail.com
2019-01-17 20:16:10 UTC
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1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.

Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?

Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?


Gratefully,
Navi
David Kleinecke
2019-01-17 22:09:15 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?
(3) is impossible - name ... worked
(2) is clumsy - ? who
(3) gives "that friend of his" unusual emphasis but is not,
in my speech derogatory
Jack
2019-01-17 23:13:21 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
3) is clumsy, because 'name' tends to attach to the clause that
follows, rather than 'friend'. But it's understandable.
Post by a***@gmail.com
Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?
No.

--
J
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-18 16:48:59 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?
Why make it more clunky than it needs to be?

He had a friend who worked with you, but I've forgotten her* name.

*or "his" or "their" as appropriate.
Post by a***@gmail.com
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-01-18 17:59:07 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?
Why make it more clunky than it needs to be?
Because this is arthur-Navi. Need anything more be said?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
He had a friend who worked with you, but I've forgotten her* name.
*or "his" or "their" as appropriate.
h***@gmail.com
2019-01-18 18:04:43 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?
Gratefully,
Navi
(3) is very natural BrE. The others are good as well but (3) puts
it into a nutshell. (1) is not derogatory.
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-18 18:21:49 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
3 sounds pretty weird to me, though people do say such things. 1 and 2
are fine. Another choice is "...the friend of his who..."
Post by a***@gmail.com
Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?
Not necessarily, but it's more adapted to ironic emphasis and a sneer.
--
Jerry Friedman
h***@gmail.com
2019-01-18 18:38:41 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I have forgotten the name of that friend of his who worked for you.
2) I have forgotten the name of his friend who worked for you.
3) I have forgotten his friend's name who worked for you.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
Is '1' derogatory towards 'that friend of his'?
The language can be pushed very far, so don't beat yourself up
about it navi :)

When most I wink, then do mine eyes best see,
For all the day they view things unrespected;
But when I sleep, in dreams they look on thee,
And darkly bright are bright in dark directed.
Then thou, whose shadow shadows doth make bright,
How would thy shadow's form form happy show
To the clear day with thy much clearer light,
When to unseeing eyes thy shade shines so!
How would, I say, mine eyes be blessed made
By looking on thee in the living day,
When in dead night thy fair imperfect shade
Through heavy sleep on sightless eyes doth stay!
All days are nights to see till I see thee,
And nights bright days when dreams do show thee me.

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