Discussion:
Vincent Bugliosi tries to coin a phrase
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Paul
2020-02-12 11:12:48 UTC
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I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.

Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2020-02-12 15:18:55 UTC
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Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
Paul
2020-02-12 16:37:30 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
I just like the imagery. Observe how popular the "elephant in the room"
saying is, but elephants are not often in rooms.

I would think that forests are good environments for flies but I'm not
an expert. It's the sort of thing Athel probably knows though I don't
think he's a specialist expert in entomology.

I think there's a need for a saying like that because I don't see a
prominent substitute. Bugliosi writes things like "It didn't attract any
more attention than a new fly in the forest."
It has some similarity to "elephant in the room" but the elephant saying
involves something noticed but not talked about, whereas the fly saying
refers to events that are not sufficiently noticed.

One way it's apt is that I think we have an expectation in a forest of
nature events happening. If flies are copulating in your room to produce
a new fly, it might attract your attention but in a forest it wouldn't.

Paul
Tony Cooper
2020-02-12 22:57:09 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
I just like the imagery. Observe how popular the "elephant in the room"
saying is, but elephants are not often in rooms.
I would think that forests are good environments for flies but I'm not
an expert. It's the sort of thing Athel probably knows though I don't
think he's a specialist expert in entomology.
Anyone who has traveled to certain states in the US during Black Fly
season knows that this variety of fly is found in the forest. Vicious
little blood-sucking creatures.

https://www.mosquitomagnet.com/articles/get-rid-of-black-flies
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
b***@aol.com
2020-02-13 17:25:58 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
I just like the imagery. Observe how popular the "elephant in the room"
saying is, but elephants are not often in rooms.
I would think that forests are good environments for flies but I'm not
an expert. It's the sort of thing Athel probably knows though I don't
think he's a specialist expert in entomology.
I think there's a need for a saying like that because I don't see a
prominent substitute.
"The devil is in the detail(s)"?
Post by Paul
Bugliosi writes things like "It didn't attract any
more attention than a new fly in the forest."
It has some similarity to "elephant in the room" but the elephant saying
involves something noticed but not talked about, whereas the fly saying
refers to events that are not sufficiently noticed.
However, not knowing Bugliosi's intent behind the phrase, one might more
likely think, on the contrary, that "a fly in the forest" is quite
insignificant and therefore unworthy of attention.
Post by Paul
One way it's apt is that I think we have an expectation in a forest of
nature events happening. If flies are copulating in your room to produce
a new fly, it might attract your attention but in a forest it wouldn't.
Paul
David Kleinecke
2020-02-13 19:40:55 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Paul
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
I just like the imagery. Observe how popular the "elephant in the room"
saying is, but elephants are not often in rooms.
I would think that forests are good environments for flies but I'm not
an expert. It's the sort of thing Athel probably knows though I don't
think he's a specialist expert in entomology.
I think there's a need for a saying like that because I don't see a
prominent substitute.
"The devil is in the detail(s)"?
Post by Paul
Bugliosi writes things like "It didn't attract any
more attention than a new fly in the forest."
It has some similarity to "elephant in the room" but the elephant saying
involves something noticed but not talked about, whereas the fly saying
refers to events that are not sufficiently noticed.
However, not knowing Bugliosi's intent behind the phrase, one might more
likely think, on the contrary, that "a fly in the forest" is quite
insignificant and therefore unworthy of attention.
Like butterflies in Sumatra?
Paul
2020-02-13 21:38:38 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Paul
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
I just like the imagery. Observe how popular the "elephant in the room"
saying is, but elephants are not often in rooms.
I would think that forests are good environments for flies but I'm not
an expert. It's the sort of thing Athel probably knows though I don't
think he's a specialist expert in entomology.
I think there's a need for a saying like that because I don't see a
prominent substitute.
"The devil is in the detail(s)"?
Post by Paul
Bugliosi writes things like "It didn't attract any
more attention than a new fly in the forest."
It has some similarity to "elephant in the room" but the elephant saying
involves something noticed but not talked about, whereas the fly saying
refers to events that are not sufficiently noticed.
However, not knowing Bugliosi's intent behind the phrase, one might more
likely think, on the contrary, that "a fly in the forest" is quite
insignificant and therefore unworthy of attention.
Bugliosi writes things like "They took no more notice of my review than
of a new fly in the forest." So the fact that "a fly in the forest" is
insignificant is exactly what makes the saying work.

"The devil is in the details" has absolutely no connection whatsoever to
anything that has been discussed on this thread.

Paul
b***@aol.com
2020-02-15 06:42:29 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Paul
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
I just like the imagery. Observe how popular the "elephant in the room"
saying is, but elephants are not often in rooms.
I would think that forests are good environments for flies but I'm not
an expert. It's the sort of thing Athel probably knows though I don't
think he's a specialist expert in entomology.
I think there's a need for a saying like that because I don't see a
prominent substitute.
"The devil is in the detail(s)"?
Post by Paul
Bugliosi writes things like "It didn't attract any
more attention than a new fly in the forest."
It has some similarity to "elephant in the room" but the elephant saying
involves something noticed but not talked about, whereas the fly saying
refers to events that are not sufficiently noticed.
However, not knowing Bugliosi's intent behind the phrase, one might more
likely think, on the contrary, that "a fly in the forest" is quite
insignificant and therefore unworthy of attention.
Bugliosi writes things like "They took no more notice of my review than
of a new fly in the forest." So the fact that "a fly in the forest" is
insignificant is exactly what makes the saying work.
But you also said "I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest"
to refer to something people don't (but should) pay attention to and
"I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to the fly
saying refers to events that are not *sufficiently* noticed" (emphasis
mine), which is what I was responding to and exactly what wouldn't make
the saying work.
Post by Paul
"The devil is in the details" has absolutely no connection whatsoever
to anything that has been discussed on this thread.
??? On the contrary, the saying is quite evocative of "something people
don't but should pay attention to" (see above).
Post by Paul
Paul
b***@aol.com
2020-02-15 16:38:55 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Paul
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Paul
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
Why is it apt? Are forests particularly known for flies?
I just like the imagery. Observe how popular the "elephant in the room"
saying is, but elephants are not often in rooms.
I would think that forests are good environments for flies but I'm not
an expert. It's the sort of thing Athel probably knows though I don't
think he's a specialist expert in entomology.
I think there's a need for a saying like that because I don't see a
prominent substitute.
"The devil is in the detail(s)"?
Post by Paul
Bugliosi writes things like "It didn't attract any
more attention than a new fly in the forest."
It has some similarity to "elephant in the room" but the elephant saying
involves something noticed but not talked about, whereas the fly saying
refers to events that are not sufficiently noticed.
However, not knowing Bugliosi's intent behind the phrase, one might more
likely think, on the contrary, that "a fly in the forest" is quite
insignificant and therefore unworthy of attention.
Bugliosi writes things like "They took no more notice of my review than
of a new fly in the forest." So the fact that "a fly in the forest" is
insignificant is exactly what makes the saying work.
But you also said "I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest"
to refer to something people don't (but should) pay attention to and
"I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to the fly
saying refers to events that are not *sufficiently* noticed" (emphasis
mine), which is what I was responding to and exactly what wouldn't make
the saying work.
Oops, it seems I messed up the cut and paste. CORRECTION:

But you also said "I really liked the phrase 'new fly in the forest'
to refer to something people don't *(but should)* pay attention to"
and "the fly saying refers to events that are not *sufficiently*
noticed" (emphasis mine), which is what I was responding to and
exactly what wouldn't make the saying work.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Paul
"The devil is in the details" has absolutely no connection whatsoever
to anything that has been discussed on this thread.
??? On the contrary, it's quite evocative of "something people don't
but should pay attention to" (see above).
Post by Paul
Paul
occam
2020-02-12 16:58:02 UTC
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Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
I'm sure that it is Bugliosi's fantasy also. I don't agree with you that
it creates a lasting image (as 'the elephant in the room'). "A new mole
on the golem's arse" is my suggestion.
Quinn C
2020-02-12 18:17:56 UTC
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Post by Paul
I really liked the phrase "new fly in the forest" to refer to
something people don't (but should) pay attention to.
I just googled it, expecting many hits, but there are very few, and all
of them refer to Bugliosi's books. So he must be the only one that's using
this phrase. It's a good one (in my opinion) and I would like to see it
catch on.
German has a nice and common phrase for the opposite, something that
people pay too much attention to: a new sow being chased through the
village. I don't know of a good English equivalent of that either.
--
Bring home one dismembered body part, once, mind you, once,
and people get twitchy about checking your luggage ever after.
-- Vicereine Cordelia
in L. McMaster Bujold, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen
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