Discussion:
[en-DE]"stationery"
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Stefan Ram
2019-11-02 17:24:41 UTC
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Supersedes: <stationary-***@ram.dialup.fu-berlin.de>
[stationary->stationery]

What's written on a sign in a department store
near the Berlin Alexander square (in German):

|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.

. What this means is (as translated by me):

|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.

. What's written on their sign is:

|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.

. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-02 17:50:18 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets

or

The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets

?

What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
--
athel
b***@aol.com
2019-11-02 18:37:12 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets
or
The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets
?
What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-02 23:01:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
b***@aol.com
2019-11-03 06:39:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
written on their sign is:

|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 14:23:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?), so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.

Stefan is weird.
b***@aol.com
2019-11-03 16:42:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 18:28:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
b***@aol.com
2019-11-03 19:26:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
of sale"), e.g.:

https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos

That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 19:33:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Have you still not understood that "statione/ary" was a MISTAKE on the
English version of the sign? It was supposed to say "Candy has to be
paid for at the candy counter."
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-03 22:07:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a
specific> > > clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be
nearer the front of> > > the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an
explanation.> It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last
line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that> > > "cashpoint" (not an AmE
term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Well yes. That's what Rey thought.
--
athel
Adam Funk
2019-11-04 11:44:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets
or
The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets
?
What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
--
athel
--
In Fortran, GOD is REAL (unless declared INTEGER).
charles
2019-11-04 12:31:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
I'd use 'cash desk' or 'cashier'. Some shops call them 'paypoints'.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-02 22:58:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets
or
The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets
?
What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
BrE vs. AmE? How cosmopolitan!

There also seems to be or to have been some confusion about stationary/
stationery. (That's easy. papER ~ stationERy)
Stefan Ram
2019-11-03 10:23:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
Notes about my errors are highly appreciated! I am keeping a
log with my errors and am re-reading it from time to time.
I'm also sorry to bother you all with my mistakes.

If you are using an UTF-8-enabled newsreader and
a monospaced font to read this post, the sign was a printout,
apparently from a laser printer, in a kind of metal frame:

------------------------------------.
| |
| Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere |
| Süßwarenartikel nur an der |
| Süßwarenkasse. |
| Danke. |
| |
| Confectionery has to be paid at |
| our stationery cashpoint. |
| Thank you. |
| |
'------------------------------------'

. ("Süßwarenartikel" and "Süßwarenkasse" were printed in bold.)
Peter Moylan
2019-11-03 11:46:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
If you are using an UTF-8-enabled newsreader and
a monospaced font to read this post, the sign was a printout,
------------------------------------.
| |
| Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere |
| Süßwarenartikel nur an der |
| Süßwarenkasse. |
| Danke. |
| |
| Confectionery has to be paid at |
| our stationery cashpoint. |
| Thank you. |
| |
'------------------------------------'
. ("Süßwarenartikel" and "Süßwarenkasse" were printed in bold.)
This does have the appearance of being a machine translation screw-up,
so I tried submitting the German sentence to Google Translate. The
result in English was "Please pay for our sweets only at the candy box."
OK, the incorrect word "stationery" did not appear.

Still, it was a bit disconcerting to see the BrE word "sweets" and the
AmE word "candy" in the same sentence. An English speaker would be
unlikely to mix the two. On top of that, what is a candy box? "Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 14:26:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Stefan Ram
If you are using an UTF-8-enabled newsreader and
a monospaced font to read this post, the sign was a printout,
------------------------------------.
| |
| Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere |
| Süßwarenartikel nur an der |
| Süßwarenkasse. |
| Danke. |
| |
| Confectionery has to be paid at |
| our stationery cashpoint. |
| Thank you. |
| |
'------------------------------------'
. ("Süßwarenartikel" and "Süßwarenkasse" were printed in bold.)
This does have the appearance of being a machine translation screw-up,
so I tried submitting the German sentence to Google Translate. The
result in English was "Please pay for our sweets only at the candy box."
OK, the incorrect word "stationery" did not appear.
Still, it was a bit disconcerting to see the BrE word "sweets" and the
AmE word "candy" in the same sentence. An English speaker would be
unlikely to mix the two. On top of that, what is a candy box? "Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
Moreover, "candy box" would mean only the empty box that candy had come in.
What you give your girlfriend is a "box of candy." (Cf. Forrest Gump's
"Life is like a box of chocolates.")
Tony Cooper
2019-11-03 16:17:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 22:46:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
"Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
Candy is the contents of the box, and not all candy comes in a box. We
can buy a box of candy, a bag of candy, or loose units of candy.

A pretty woman can be described as "eye candy". A person who is
afraid to do something can be called a "candy ass". I don't think
"sweet" would work as a substitute for "candy" in either expression.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ken Blake
2019-11-03 17:08:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 22:46:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
"Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
Candy is the contents of the box, and not all candy comes in a box. We
can buy a box of candy, a bag of candy, or loose units of candy.
A pretty woman can be described as "eye candy". A person who is
afraid to do something can be called a "candy ass". I don't think
"sweet" would work as a substitute for "candy" in either expression.
And "candy" wouldn't work as a substitute for "sweet" in "You bet your
sweet ass I am."
--
Ken
Peter Moylan
2019-11-04 00:34:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 22:46:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
"Candy" isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the
AmE meaning is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy.
(Probably a mixed assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse,
which in my understanding is a place where you hand over some
money.
Candy is the contents of the box, and not all candy comes in a box.
We can buy a box of candy, a bag of candy, or loose units of candy.
Yes, but you snipped the part that said that the term under discussion
wasn't "candy", but "candy box".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
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