Discussion:
[en-DE]"stationery"
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Stefan Ram
2019-11-02 17:24:41 UTC
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Supersedes: <stationary-***@ram.dialup.fu-berlin.de>
[stationary->stationery]

What's written on a sign in a department store
near the Berlin Alexander square (in German):

|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.

. What this means is (as translated by me):

|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.

. What's written on their sign is:

|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.

. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-02 17:50:18 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets

or

The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets

?

What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
--
athel
b***@aol.com
2019-11-02 18:37:12 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets
or
The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets
?
What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-02 23:01:29 UTC
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Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
b***@aol.com
2019-11-03 06:39:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
written on their sign is:

|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 14:23:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?), so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.

Stefan is weird.
b***@aol.com
2019-11-03 16:42:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 18:28:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
b***@aol.com
2019-11-03 19:26:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
of sale"), e.g.:

https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos

That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 19:33:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Have you still not understood that "statione/ary" was a MISTAKE on the
English version of the sign? It was supposed to say "Candy has to be
paid for at the candy counter."
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-04 15:19:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Have you still not understood that "statione/ary" was a MISTAKE on the
English version of the sign? It was supposed to say "Candy has to be
paid for at the candy counter."
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by "stationery
cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile payment is
impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.

Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.

Why would there be different payment systems for German-literates and
English-literates?
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
b***@aol.com
2019-11-04 16:09:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Have you still not understood that "statione/ary" was a MISTAKE on the
English version of the sign? It was supposed to say "Candy has to be
paid for at the candy counter."
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by "stationery
cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile payment is
impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.
Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.
This is not about literary translation, and an "adaptation" is OK as long
as the message is conveyed. To take an example based on a recent AUE topic,
"tennis - what's new in terminology", where the Hawk-Eye system was mentioned,
I noticed, watching the Paris Masters 1000 tennis event that ended yesterday,
that, when a player wanted to confirm whether a call was good, the umpire
successively announced "Mesdames et Messieurs, M. <name of player> veut
faire appel à l'arbitrage vidéo" (= "Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr <name of
player> wants to resort to instant replay) in French and "Ladies and
Gentlemen, Mr <name of player> is challenging the call" in English. As you
can see, the two wordings have apparently nothing in common, but concretely,
they amount to the same meaning.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why would there be different payment systems for German-literates and
English-literates?
Again, you missed my point. The payment system is the same for both: it's
the stationary checkout of the store, which also happens to be the only
payment system available for candy (whereas other goods can be paid using
mobile terminals).
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-04 18:04:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Have you still not understood that "statione/ary" was a MISTAKE on the
English version of the sign? It was supposed to say "Candy has to be
paid for at the candy counter."
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by "stationery
cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile payment is
impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.
Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.
This is not about literary translation, and an "adaptation" is OK as long
as the message is conveyed.
The English does not "convey" the "message" of the German.

Commercial translators -- by far the largest portion of translators --
must be ACCURATE. Where did you get "literary translation"?
Post by b***@aol.com
To take an example based on a recent AUE topic,
"tennis - what's new in terminology",
I have quite successfully avoided looking at that thread.
Post by b***@aol.com
where the Hawk-Eye system was mentioned,
I noticed, watching the Paris Masters 1000 tennis event that ended yesterday,
that, when a player wanted to confirm whether a call was good, the umpire
successively announced "Mesdames et Messieurs, M. <name of player> veut
faire appel à l'arbitrage vidéo" (= "Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr <name of
player> wants to resort to instant replay) in French and "Ladies and
Gentlemen, Mr <name of player> is challenging the call" in English. As you
can see, the two wordings have apparently nothing in common, but concretely,
they amount to the same meaning.
"Candy counter" and "statione/ary counter" do not.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why would there be different payment systems for German-literates and
English-literates?
Again, you missed my point. The payment system is the same for both: it's
the stationary checkout of the store, which also happens to be the only
payment system available for candy (whereas other goods can be paid using
mobile terminals).
If that's the French attitude toward translation, it's a good thing the EU
defaults to English.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
b***@aol.com
2019-11-04 18:32:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an explanation.
It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Have you still not understood that "statione/ary" was a MISTAKE on the
English version of the sign? It was supposed to say "Candy has to be
paid for at the candy counter."
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by "stationery
cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile payment is
impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.
Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.
This is not about literary translation, and an "adaptation" is OK as long
as the message is conveyed.
The English does not "convey" the "message" of the German.
Commercial translators -- by far the largest portion of translators --
must be ACCURATE. Where did you get "literary translation"?
Post by b***@aol.com
To take an example based on a recent AUE topic,
"tennis - what's new in terminology",
I have quite successfully avoided looking at that thread.
Post by b***@aol.com
where the Hawk-Eye system was mentioned,
I noticed, watching the Paris Masters 1000 tennis event that ended yesterday,
that, when a player wanted to confirm whether a call was good, the umpire
successively announced "Mesdames et Messieurs, M. <name of player> veut
faire appel à l'arbitrage vidéo" (= "Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr <name of
player> wants to resort to instant replay) in French and "Ladies and
Gentlemen, Mr <name of player> is challenging the call" in English. As you
can see, the two wordings have apparently nothing in common, but
concretely, they amount to the same meaning.
"Candy counter" and "statione/ary counter" do not.
How can one possibly deny the obvious with such aplomb?
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Why would there be different payment systems for German-literates and
English-literates?
Again, you missed my point. The payment system is the same for both: it's
the stationary checkout of the store, which also happens to be the only
payment system available for candy (whereas other goods can be paid using
mobile terminals).
If that's the French attitude toward translation, it's a good thing the EU
defaults to English.
Yet another irrelevant cop-out.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-11-04 19:52:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
Le lundi 4 novembre 2019 16:19:12 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels a écrit
wrot
Le dimanche 3 novembre 2019 20:33:25 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels a
Ã
On Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 2:26:09 PM UTC-5,
Le dimanche 3 novembre 2019 19:28:20 UTC+1, Peter T.
Daniels a
On Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 11:42:36 AM UTC-5,
Le dimanche 3 novembre 2019 15:23:57 UTC+1, Peter T.
Daniel
On Sunday, November 3, 2019 at 1:39:21 AM UTC-5,
Le dimanche 3 novembre 2019 00:01:31 UTC+1, Peter
T. Da
On Saturday, November 2, 2019 at 2:37:15 PM
UTC-4, be
Le samedi 2 novembre 2019 18:50:23 UTC+1, Athel
Cor
On 2019-11-02 17:24:41 +0000, Stefan Ram
up.fu-berlin.de>
[a hundred lines too much]

Please trim. Or avoid getting into an arg^w discussion with PTD.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
CDB
2019-11-04 20:34:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
["I wuv u": nothing sends that message like a gumdrop]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
To take an example based on a recent AUE topic, "tennis - what's
new in terminology",
I have quite successfully avoided looking at that thread.
Sorry for piggyback. Didn't see you there.

[...]
Post by Peter T. Daniels
where the Hawk-Eye system was mentioned, I noticed, watching the
Paris Masters 1000 tennis event that ended yesterday, that, when a
player wanted to confirm whether a call was good, the umpire
successively announced "Mesdames et Messieurs, M. <name of player>
veut faire appel l'arbitrage vidéo" (= "Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr
<name of player> wants to resort to instant replay) in French and
"Ladies and Gentlemen, Mr <name of player> is challenging the call"
in English. As you can see, the two wordings have apparently
nothing in common, but concretely, they amount to the same
meaning.
They're not really that different, except that the French mentions
video. To appeal to another kind of ruling is to challenge the call.

[more candy]
Sam Plusnet
2019-11-04 19:59:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by "stationery
cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile payment is
impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.
Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.
Are you quite sure that a shop must employ the services of a
professional translator to produce their signs?

It seems far more likely for the job to be dumped on someone on their
staff who has (or claims to have) a reasonable grasp of both languages.
--
Sam Plusnet
Stefan Ram
2019-11-04 20:22:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Are you quite sure that a shop must employ the services of a
professional translator to produce their signs?
It seems far more likely for the job to be dumped on someone on their
staff who has (or claims to have) a reasonable grasp of both languages.
It seems obvious to me that this is not a translation by
someone who has been trained as a translator. It must have
been translated by an employee with some superficial
knowledge of English that he overestimated¹ - which had the
consequence of not even having used a dictionary to verify
the translation. Confusing "stationery" with "confectionery"
/after/ the correct word "confectionery" already has been
used is also somewhat bizarr. The actual /stationery checkout/
is a few floors up.

Ok, here it is:

Loading Image...

. ¹ I'm guilty of that too, I know!
Mark Brader
2019-11-04 20:45:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
http://www.purl.org/stefan_ram/jpg/stationery.jpg
Ah. So it has the correct -ery ending both in the right word
"confectionery" and in the wrong word "stationery", but does
omit the "for" after "paid".

I am now struck by another point. In German, customers are asked
to "please" pay for the confectionery at the confectionery checkout,
whereas in English, "please" does not fit, because the sentence has
been converted to the passive. Both sets of customers get thanked
for their compliance, though.

I'm not bothered about the use or non-use of "please" on this sort of
sign, but when it disappears in translation, that seems weird.

Also, it's now clear that the sign is in the confectionery department,
so how far from the confectionery checkout is it anyway? I'm inclined
to wonder whether a suitably placed sign reading

"Please pay *here* for confectionery."

would suffice.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "In my case, self-absorption is
***@vex.net completely justified." -- LAURA

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Stefan Ram
2019-11-04 21:12:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Also, it's now clear that the sign is in the confectionery department,
so how far from the confectionery checkout is it anyway?
I was cursorily looking for the confectionery checkout,
but did not find it. I bought some food there, but not
confectionery, so I paid at the general grocery checkout.
Tony Cooper
2019-11-04 20:53:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by "stationery
cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile payment is
impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.
Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.
Are you quite sure that a shop must employ the services of a
professional translator to produce their signs?
It seems far more likely for the job to be dumped on someone on their
staff who has (or claims to have) a reasonable grasp of both languages.
In a photo forum that I follow there is a perpetual thread titled
"Signs". Followers of that forum post photographs of signs they have
seen. Quite a few of the photographs are of signs in some non-English
speaking country where the sign is in English.

And, most of *those* signs are awkward, wrong, or humorous attempts at
English. There are hundreds of such photographs in that thread.

Obviously, no "translator" was involved. Some employee or owner of
the place who thinks they know the English word or spelling is the
culprit.

God bless 'em, and may they continue to mangle our language. We need
the laughs.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-04 21:16:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by "stationery
cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile payment is
impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.
Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.
Are you quite sure that a shop must employ the services of a
professional translator to produce their signs?
It seems far more likely for the job to be dumped on someone on their
staff who has (or claims to have) a reasonable grasp of both languages.
If they're on the staff of the store, then they probably already know
that you don't pay for candy in the stationery department. It simply
makes no sense.
charles
2019-11-04 21:32:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Have you still not understood that my claim is that the translator may
have deliberately replaced what is "candy counter" in German by
"stationery cashpoint" in English to underline the fact that mobile
payment is impossible for candy?
No, I have not, because that is utterly absurd, ridiculous, etc. etc. etc.
Any translator who did such a thing would not long be a professional
translator.
Are you quite sure that a shop must employ the services of a
professional translator to produce their signs?
even professional translators ( or their customers) get it wrong sometimes.

The was recently a business site in Wales which needed a sign in Welsh, so
they sent their English text to a translation firm by email. They got a
quick response and had the sign made and erected. it read "Out of office
auto-reply. We will be back in the office next week."
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-03 22:07:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
What's unusual only seems to be the English wording of the sign.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a
specific> > > clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be
nearer the front of> > > the store (less shoplifter-worthy?),
But that would be incompatible with the German wording of the sign.
Stefan claims that that's what the sign says. Stefan wanted an
explanation.> It is not so absurd as Stefan seemed to think. See last
line below.
If you google it, you'll find there are thousands of pages about payment
in stores where "mobile" is contrasted with "stationary", including with
terms such as "mobile POS" vs "stationary POS" (where POS means "point
https://www.gk-software.com/en/products/productfinder/mobile-pos
That tends to hint at a simple misspelling rather than a cock-and-bull
scenario of the candy checkout being located in the stationery department.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
so the customer would be passing that> > > "cashpoint" (not an AmE
term) in any case.
Stefan is weird.
Well yes. That's what Rey thought.
--
athel
Quinn C
2019-11-04 19:38:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
But from where in the German would he have gotten either of those words?
From nowhere. I gather (but that's unclear reading the OP) that "What's
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint." refers to a
second sign intended for English-speakers in the store - in which case
"stationery cashpoint" could be used (improperly) for "stationary
checkout" and "Süßwaren"(kasse) could be arbitrarily omitted and replaced
by "stationery" (as distinct from mobile payment options) in the English
translation.
And what would be unusual about specifying where to pay for a purchase?
Maybe they don't do enough business in candy to justify hiring a specific
clerk for that area, whereas the stationery might be nearer the front of
the store (less shoplifter-worthy?), so the customer would be passing that
"cashpoint" (not an AmE term) in any case.
Nothing would be unusual about specifying where to pay, as in fact the
sign does. But it would be unusual to direct customers that read German
to one place (the candy checkout), but customers who read only English
to another one (the stationery checkout.) One can invent a scenario
where this makes sense - the stationery checkout is staffed by
English-speaking people -, but I find it much more likely that there
was a translation mixup of some kind.
--
... man muss oft schon Wissenschaft infrage stellen bei den Wirt-
schaftsmenschen [...] das Denken wird haeufig blockiert von einem
ideologischen Ueberbau [...] Es ist halt in vielen Teilen eher
eine Religion als eine Wissenschaft. -- Heiner Flassbeck
Adam Funk
2019-11-04 11:44:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets
or
The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets
?
What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
--
athel
--
In Fortran, GOD is REAL (unless declared INTEGER).
charles
2019-11-04 12:31:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
I'd use 'cash desk' or 'cashier'. Some shops call them 'paypoints'.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Ken Blake
2019-11-04 15:46:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint" used for anything at all. It's
a new term to me. The only terms I know are "ATM" (in the US) and
"Bancomat" (in much of Europe).
--
Ken
charles
2019-11-04 17:43:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Adam Funk
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint" used for anything at all. It's
a new term to me. The only terms I know are "ATM" (in the US) and
"Bancomat" (in much of Europe).
"hole in the wall" is another
Post by Ken Blake
--
Ke
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Lewis
2019-11-04 19:24:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Adam Funk
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint" used for anything at all. It's
a new term to me. The only terms I know are "ATM" (in the US) and
"Bancomat" (in much of Europe).
I know I've heard cashpoint. Probably form a Brit or on a British TV
show.
--
Wherever the worm turns, he is still a worm.
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-04 17:23:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
...

You can do that at a cash register these days, though. Could Germans
use the same word for the two kinds of machines?
--
Jerry Friedman
b***@aol.com
2019-11-04 17:44:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Adam Funk
Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
It may be that "stationery" is a misspelling for "stationary", so
that "stationery cashpoint" refers to the store checkout and the
sentence means that sweets can only be paid at the checkout, as opposed
to via mobile payment terminals (e.g. smartphones or tablets) as is now
possible in some stores.
Also, "cashpoint" is BrE for ATM (machine that lets you withdraw cash
from your bank account). I don't think I've ever heard "cashpoint"
used for anything else.
...
You can do that at a cash register these days, though. Could Germans
use the same word for the two kinds of machines?
What I thought too. I don't speak German, but google-imaging "Bargeldpunkt"
(a literal translation of "cashpoint") returns images of both, e.g.:

https://de.dreamstime.com/stockfotos-atm-geldmaschine-automatisierter-bargeldpunkt-image12432043

and

https://de.dreamstime.com/lizenzfreie-stockbilder-bargeldpunkt-im-supermarktspeicher-image30101929
Post by Jerry Friedman
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-02 22:58:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
[stationary->stationery]
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
|Please pay our sweets only at the candy checkout.
|Confectionary has to be paid at our stationery cashpoint.
. "Stationery cashpoint" for the candy checkout?
Can "stationery" mean "candies"/"confectionery"?
No, but you need to rethink and rewrite the whole message if you want
it to be answerable.
Post by Stefan Ram
Please pay
for
Post by Stefan Ram
our sweets only at the candy checkout.
The candy checkout only deals with sweets
or
The candy checkout is the only one where you can buy sweets
?
What difference do you intend between "sweets" and "candy"?
BrE vs. AmE? How cosmopolitan!

There also seems to be or to have been some confusion about stationary/
stationery. (That's easy. papER ~ stationERy)
Stefan Ram
2019-11-03 10:23:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
What's written on a sign in a department store
|Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere Süßwarenartikel nur an der
|Süßwarenkasse.
Notes about my errors are highly appreciated! I am keeping a
log with my errors and am re-reading it from time to time.
I'm also sorry to bother you all with my mistakes.

If you are using an UTF-8-enabled newsreader and
a monospaced font to read this post, the sign was a printout,
apparently from a laser printer, in a kind of metal frame:

------------------------------------.
| |
| Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere |
| Süßwarenartikel nur an der |
| Süßwarenkasse. |
| Danke. |
| |
| Confectionery has to be paid at |
| our stationery cashpoint. |
| Thank you. |
| |
'------------------------------------'

. ("Süßwarenartikel" and "Süßwarenkasse" were printed in bold.)
Peter Moylan
2019-11-03 11:46:33 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
If you are using an UTF-8-enabled newsreader and
a monospaced font to read this post, the sign was a printout,
------------------------------------.
| |
| Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere |
| Süßwarenartikel nur an der |
| Süßwarenkasse. |
| Danke. |
| |
| Confectionery has to be paid at |
| our stationery cashpoint. |
| Thank you. |
| |
'------------------------------------'
. ("Süßwarenartikel" and "Süßwarenkasse" were printed in bold.)
This does have the appearance of being a machine translation screw-up,
so I tried submitting the German sentence to Google Translate. The
result in English was "Please pay for our sweets only at the candy box."
OK, the incorrect word "stationery" did not appear.

Still, it was a bit disconcerting to see the BrE word "sweets" and the
AmE word "candy" in the same sentence. An English speaker would be
unlikely to mix the two. On top of that, what is a candy box? "Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-03 14:26:21 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Stefan Ram
If you are using an UTF-8-enabled newsreader and
a monospaced font to read this post, the sign was a printout,
------------------------------------.
| |
| Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere |
| Süßwarenartikel nur an der |
| Süßwarenkasse. |
| Danke. |
| |
| Confectionery has to be paid at |
| our stationery cashpoint. |
| Thank you. |
| |
'------------------------------------'
. ("Süßwarenartikel" and "Süßwarenkasse" were printed in bold.)
This does have the appearance of being a machine translation screw-up,
so I tried submitting the German sentence to Google Translate. The
result in English was "Please pay for our sweets only at the candy box."
OK, the incorrect word "stationery" did not appear.
Still, it was a bit disconcerting to see the BrE word "sweets" and the
AmE word "candy" in the same sentence. An English speaker would be
unlikely to mix the two. On top of that, what is a candy box? "Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
Moreover, "candy box" would mean only the empty box that candy had come in.
What you give your girlfriend is a "box of candy." (Cf. Forrest Gump's
"Life is like a box of chocolates.")
Tony Cooper
2019-11-03 16:17:22 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 22:46:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
"Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
Candy is the contents of the box, and not all candy comes in a box. We
can buy a box of candy, a bag of candy, or loose units of candy.

A pretty woman can be described as "eye candy". A person who is
afraid to do something can be called a "candy ass". I don't think
"sweet" would work as a substitute for "candy" in either expression.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ken Blake
2019-11-03 17:08:43 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 22:46:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
"Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
Candy is the contents of the box, and not all candy comes in a box. We
can buy a box of candy, a bag of candy, or loose units of candy.
A pretty woman can be described as "eye candy". A person who is
afraid to do something can be called a "candy ass". I don't think
"sweet" would work as a substitute for "candy" in either expression.
And "candy" wouldn't work as a substitute for "sweet" in "You bet your
sweet ass I am."
--
Ken
Peter Moylan
2019-11-04 00:34:58 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 22:46:33 +1100, Peter Moylan
"Candy" isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the
AmE meaning is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy.
(Probably a mixed assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse,
which in my understanding is a place where you hand over some
money.
Candy is the contents of the box, and not all candy comes in a box.
We can buy a box of candy, a bag of candy, or loose units of candy.
Yes, but you snipped the part that said that the term under discussion
wasn't "candy", but "candy box".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Quinn C
2019-11-04 19:35:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Stefan Ram
If you are using an UTF-8-enabled newsreader and
a monospaced font to read this post, the sign was a printout,
------------------------------------.
| |
| Bitte bezahlen Sie unsere |
| Süßwarenartikel nur an der |
| Süßwarenkasse. |
| Danke. |
| |
| Confectionery has to be paid at |
| our stationery cashpoint. |
| Thank you. |
| |
'------------------------------------'
. ("Süßwarenartikel" and "Süßwarenkasse" were printed in bold.)
This does have the appearance of being a machine translation screw-up,
so I tried submitting the German sentence to Google Translate. The
result in English was "Please pay for our sweets only at the candy box."
OK, the incorrect word "stationery" did not appear.
Still, it was a bit disconcerting to see the BrE word "sweets" and the
AmE word "candy" in the same sentence. An English speaker would be
unlikely to mix the two. On top of that, what is a candy box? "Candy"
isn't really in my vocabulary, but my understanding of the AmE meaning
is that it's a small cardboard box containing candy. (Probably a mixed
assortment.) Nothing to do with a German Kasse, which in my
understanding is a place where you hand over some money.
A "Kasse" in general is where money is kept. When I buy sweets in our
company kitchen, I put money in a box which could be called "Kasse" in
German. It's a cognate of "cash". We've talked before about how in
Canada, you can pay "at the cash". That's a very similar usage to the
German in the sign.

A human translator would understand that inside a store, the "Kasse"
would be a Registerkasse, a cash register, not just a box.
--
... it might be nice to see ourselves reflected in TV shows and
Pride season campaigns, but the cis white men who invented the
gender binary still own the damn mirror.
-- Delilah Friedler at slate.com
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