Discussion:
Diplomacy - from ping-pong to vaccine
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occam
2021-04-28 07:07:36 UTC
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'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.

The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.

I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?

(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
Jack
2021-04-28 08:23:55 UTC
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Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
occam
2021-04-28 08:50:41 UTC
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Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
That falls under the classic 'military diplomacy' definition. The
surprising thing (for me) is that the term seems to go as far back as
cir. 1850s.
J. J. Lodder
2021-04-30 19:49:49 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
That falls under the classic 'military diplomacy' definition. The
surprising thing (for me) is that the term seems to go as far back as
cir. 1850s.
Guess it started in practice, if not in name,
with Commodore Perry's 'friendly' visit to Japan,

Jan
Anders D. Nygaard
2021-04-30 18:27:43 UTC
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Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.

/Anders, Denmark.
occam
2021-04-30 18:58:34 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began.  When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
Jerry Friedman
2021-04-30 20:41:16 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
No one could bear that.
--
Jerry Friedman
bil...@shaw.ca
2021-04-30 21:03:27 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
No one could bear that.
It would certainly bamboozle me.

bill
occam
2021-04-30 23:25:26 UTC
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Post by ***@shaw.ca
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
No one could bear that.
It would certainly bamboozle me.
But would it pander to your needs?
Lewis
2021-04-30 21:21:58 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
No one could bear that.
Oh no, are they bears again?

I wish they'd make up their damn minds on what a panda is. Seems wrong
to classify it as a carnivore, IMO, since it can only eat bamboo.¹

Also, bears are clever and pandas are... well, morons. Cute morons
because of their coloring, but morons nonetheless.

(If you take the spots off a panda is looks a lot like a giant rat,
making it possibly a rodent of unusual size?)

¹ Having been marked down on a biology test in... 1980? for referring to
a panda as a bear, I still hold a bit of a grudge.
--
There are 10 types of people in the world: Those who understand
binary and those who don't.
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-01 01:49:43 UTC
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Post by Lewis
(If you take the spots off a panda is looks a lot like a giant rat,
making it possibly a rodent of unusual size?)
Is that a Sumatra/Holmes reference?

Rats must be like robins, in that your US versions must very different
to those we see here.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
Lewis
2021-05-01 02:05:37 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Lewis
(If you take the spots off a panda is looks a lot like a giant rat,
making it possibly a rodent of unusual size?)
Is that a Sumatra/Holmes reference?
No, a Princess Bride reference.
Post by Sam Plusnet
Rats must be like robins, in that your US versions must very different
to those we see here.
Have you seen what an all-white panda looks like?

Don't bother to search the Internet, all the images are fake pictures
referencing the various Chinese Zoos passing off other animals as things
like lions (a dog) or zebra (pony with painted stripes).
--
“But I don’t understand! I don’t understand how this all happens. How we go
through this. I knew her, and then she’s – there’s just a body, and I don’t
understand why she just can’t get back in it and not be dead…anymore! It’s
stupid! It’s mortal and stupid! And…and Xander’s crying and not talking,
and…and I was having fruit punch, and I thought, well, Joyce will never have
any more fruit punch, ever, and she’ll never have eggs, or yawn, or brush her
hair, not ever, and no one will explain to me why!”
Chrysi Cat
2021-05-01 07:59:36 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
No one could bear that.
Oh no, are they bears again?
I wish they'd make up their damn minds on what a panda is. Seems wrong
to classify it as a carnivore, IMO, since it can only eat bamboo.¹
They HAVE made their mind up, via molecular study, and you're not going
to like it: less than a decade after you were marked off for that
answer, it became accepted truth in some zoological circles and it's now
accepted in all of them [incidentally, Brontosaurus existed after all,
too, just to do MORE damage to the lessons we were taught four decades
ago] and has started becoming mainstream knowledge--this might be partly
because of the Wikipedia article accessible to the general public, which
has the academic citations in its footnotes.

Current understanding is that they're the first of the bear lineage to
diverge from the common line, 19 million years ago, but still bears.
That also makes the panda a living fossil as it hasn't developed all
that much SINCE.

It also means that the corollary to what you were told in 1980, namely
"They are instead close relatives to the LESSER panda after all", is NOT
true. The convergent evolution WAS of "panda's thumbs" after all, not to
a raccoon-like and a bear-like form.
Post by Lewis
Also, bears are clever and pandas are... well, morons. Cute morons
because of their coloring, but morons nonetheless.
(If you take the spots off a panda is looks a lot like a giant rat,
making it possibly a rodent of unusual size?)
¹ Having been marked down on a biology test in... 1980? for referring to
a panda as a bear, I still hold a bit of a grudge.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Lewis
2021-05-01 09:35:37 UTC
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Post by Chrysi Cat
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by occam
'Vaccine diplomacy' has been making the rounds since the covid-19
vaccination programme began. When I tried to think of other specialized
forms, the only other genre that came to mind was ping-pong diplomacy.
This term was bouncing around a lot in the 1970s.
The Britannica definition(*) fails to mention 'ping-pong'. I suspect
'vaccine' will not get a mention either, given the nature of Britannica.
I am interested in other forms of diplomacy that may emerge in the
future. The currency of such diplomacy would be a scarce resource.
Could, for example, the foreseen water crisis result in 'water
diplomacy'? How about carbon-offset diplomacy?
(*)https://www.britannica.com/topic/diplomacy
There was "gunboat diplomacy", once.
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
No one could bear that.
Oh no, are they bears again?
I wish they'd make up their damn minds on what a panda is. Seems wrong
to classify it as a carnivore, IMO, since it can only eat bamboo.¹
They HAVE made their mind up,
Sure sure, and the HAD made their minds up when they decided they weren't
bears too.¹
Post by Chrysi Cat
via molecular study, and you're not going to like it: less than a
decade after you were marked off for that answer,
It was a US public school so probably 40 years after our text book was
published.
Post by Chrysi Cat
Current understanding is that they're the first of the bear lineage to
diverge from the common line, 19 million years ago, but still bears.
That also makes the panda a living fossil as it hasn't developed all
that much SINCE.
That certainly tracks.

¹ Yes yes, I am mostly joking here, and venting. But would I be
surprised to see them suddenly classified into a new family, distinct
from other bears? Or some other shenanigans? I would not.
--
"Are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"I think so, Brain. But Trojans won’t arrive on the scene for another
300 years."
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 09:08:24 UTC
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Post by Lewis
¹ Having been marked down on a biology test in... 1980? for
referring to a panda as a bear, I still hold a bit of a grudge.
I know the feeling. I was laughed at in primary school by a teacher for
insisting that "perpendicular" meant "at right angles". She told me that
it meant "vertical".

Many years later, I learnt in this very newsgroup that "vertical" was
indeed one of the meanings, although it's probably less common than the
mathematical definition.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-05-01 12:21:09 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Lewis
[ … ]
I wish they'd make up their damn minds on what a panda is. Seems wrong
to classify it as a carnivore, IMO, since it can only eat bamboo.¹
Also, bears are clever and pandas are... well, morons. Cute morons
because of their coloring, but morons nonetheless.
(If you take the spots off a panda is looks a lot like a giant rat,
making it possibly a rodent of unusual size?)
A few years ago I was in a small park in Blumenau (Brazil) when I
suddenly noticed a couple of capybaras munching away at the grass a
metre or so away from me. They took no notice at all of me and I tried
to ignore them, but a rodent as big as a pig isn't easy to ignore.
Post by Lewis
¹ Having been marked down on a biology test in... 1980? for referring to
a panda as a bear, I still hold a bit of a grudge.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Ken Blake
2021-05-01 15:34:40 UTC
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Post by Lewis
(If you take the spots off a panda is looks a lot like a giant rat,
making it possibly a rodent of unusual size?)
Not all pandas have spots. The giant panda does, but the red panda (aka
lesser panda) does not.
--
Ken
Lewis
2021-05-01 17:42:51 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Lewis
(If you take the spots off a panda is looks a lot like a giant rat,
making it possibly a rodent of unusual size?)
Not all pandas have spots. The giant panda does, but the red panda (aka
lesser panda) does not.
Panda without a modifier is a large white with black spots animal. The
red panda is an entirely unrelated animal and must always be a "red
panda" as to distinguish it from a panda.

Red pandas look a look like raccoons, only cuter and without the evil
tendencies, the toxic feces, or the wanton destruction.
--
“What’s a little boy like you doing with big boy smut like this?”
Stefan Ram
2021-05-01 18:55:51 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Not all pandas have spots. The giant panda does, but the red panda (aka
lesser panda) does not.
Despite its name, the red panda is not closely related to
the giant panda.

The red panda has previously been placed in the raccoon and
bear families, but the results of phylogenetic analysis
provide strong support for its taxonomic classification in
its own family, Ailuridae, which is part of the superfamily
Musteloidea, along with the weasel, raccoon and skunk families.

Jerry Friedman
2021-05-01 18:14:02 UTC
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...
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
Yes! Better than giving each other black eyes.
No one could bear that.
Oh no, are they bears again?
I actually didn't know that when I posted. Anything for a pun.
Post by Lewis
I wish they'd make up their damn minds on what a panda is.
Try having a hobby like birdwatching or botany.
Post by Lewis
Seems wrong
to classify it as a carnivore, IMO, since it can only eat bamboo.¹
...

According to Wikipedia, only 99+% of their diet is bamboo. They do
occasionally eat animal food (that is, food of animal origin).
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2021-05-01 04:19:07 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
"Panda diplomacy" also appears to be a thing.
A gentler alternative to panda monium.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
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