Discussion:
partyer, partier ???
(too old to reply)
Simon
2007-01-01 23:09:29 UTC
Permalink
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
Both the words partyer and partier are listed by dictionary.com:
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier

However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.

Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?

Happy New Year,
Simon.
Robert Bannister
2007-01-02 00:40:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
I'd call it newspaper-speak, but I'd have no difficulty in understanding
either in context.
--
Rob Bannister
tinwhistler
2007-01-02 04:11:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
I'd call it newspaper-speak, but I'd have no difficulty in understanding
either in context.
--
Rob Bannister
Searching Google-News for "partiers" I got hundreds of hits for the US,
a great many from Canada, some from Australia, India, Cayman Islands,
Taiwan, Pakistan, Kenya -- but none from the UK. Some of the countries
seem to use the term only when speaking of political party members,
while others clearly are referring to reveling boozers or some such
ilk. "Partyers" got about one-sixth as many hits, all from the US and
Canada except for one from New Zealand.

Aloha- ~~~ Ozzie Maland ~~~ San Diego
UC
2007-01-01 23:42:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
I can't imagine why.

Try 'reveler'.
Post by Simon
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
Irrelevant.
Post by Simon
Happy New Year,
Simon.
the Omrud
2007-01-02 10:19:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by UC
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
I can't imagine why.
Try 'reveler'.
Is that a US spelling? I spell it "reveller".
--
David
=====
Skitt
2007-01-02 19:06:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by UC
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other
on-line dictionary.
I can't imagine why.
Try 'reveler'.
Is that a US spelling? I spell it "reveller".
Yup. OK.
--
Skitt
Living in The Heart of the Bay
http://www.ci.hayward.ca.us/
Mike Lyle
2007-01-01 23:52:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
Oxford lists "partyer" only as a variant; I can't tell where its only
"y" example was written, but OED certainly found the word on both sides
the Atlantic.

<Forms: 19- partier, partyer.

A person who enjoys giving or attending parties; a party-goer.

1965 J. HART File for Death xii. 94 Jinsie most certainly did not care
for the 'partiers'. 1973 Daily Colonist (Victoria, Brit. Columbia)
16 Sept. 13/3 Women are generally neater than men, he concedes, and are
not partiers. 1989 Shareware Mag. June-Aug. 23/1 Partyers were on the
dance floor. 2001 Sunday Herald (Glasgow) 12 Aug. (Seven Days section)
5/6 I'm not a big partier, though I'm not a shut-in either.>

As you know, the general rule is to change "y" to "i" before vowels
other than "i"; but in this case I'm hesitant. That's because leaving
it as "y" signals more clearly to the reader what's being done: it's
not common in writing, and my mind half wants to interpret "partier" as
some French word I don't know.
--
Mike.
Martin Ambuhl
2007-01-02 08:06:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
The _Shorter Oxford English Dictionary_ tends to mark words and terms
that are principally North American, but its entry is:

partier, noun. /"pA;tI@/ colloq. M20. [from PARTY noun + -ER1.]
A person who likes to give or attend parties; a person at a party.

There is no such marking as not being BrE.

Nor does MWCD11 mark it as principally AmE or BrE, but it does give both
spellings.
CyberCypher
2007-01-02 09:12:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Simon
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
I've heard only "party-goer", "party-girl", and "party-animal".
"Partier" seems to me to imply that A has more parts than B has or that
A's party is more of a party than B's party. "Partyer" seems a
reasonably objectionable spelling to me. I don't like "partier", but I
would understand the clause "When the partiers arrived".

--
Franke: EFL teacher & medical editor
Native speaker of American English; posting from Taiwan.
"I once asked a senior staffer of a brilliant Senator why the Senator
didn't take a stronger position in favor of Net Neutrality. 'No
Senator remains a Senator opposing an industry with that much money'
was his answer." Lawrence Lessig, Lessig Blog, December 24, 2006
http://www.lessig.org/blog/
m***@gmail.com
2019-11-12 10:28:26 UTC
Permalink
Either spelling is acceptable if you're in America. Now if you're on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean i wouldn't have the foggiest clue. Have a nice day.
Peter Moylan
2019-11-12 11:20:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
Either spelling is acceptable if you're in America. Now if you're on
the other side of the Atlantic Ocean i wouldn't have the foggiest
clue. Have a nice day.
This is the partiest post I've read today. I suppose it would make more
sense if we knew what it was a reply to.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-12 11:26:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
Either spelling is acceptable if you're in America. Now if you're on
the other side of the Atlantic Ocean i wouldn't have the foggiest
clue. Have a nice day.
This is the partiest post I've read today. I suppose it would make more
sense if we knew what it was a reply to.
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
Happy New Year,
Simon.
The following day, eight replies (by various people) were added to the
thread, which then died... until now.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Snidely
2019-11-13 09:39:42 UTC
Permalink
Richard Heathfield pounded on thar keyboard to tell us
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
Either spelling is acceptable if you're in America. Now if you're on
the other side of the Atlantic Ocean i wouldn't have the foggiest
clue. Have a nice day.
This is the partiest post I've read today. I suppose it would make more
sense if we knew what it was a reply to.
Hi,
Being that time of year I have a festive question.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/partier
However I haven't found either of these two words in any other on-line
dictionary.
Does anybody know if they are American English and not British English?
Happy New Year,
Simon.
The following day, eight replies (by various people) were added to the
thread, which then died... until now.
Just in time for holiday season partyiers.

/dps
--
Maybe C282Y is simply one of the hangers-on, a groupie following a
future guitar god of the human genome: an allele with undiscovered
virtuosity, currently soloing in obscurity in Mom's garage.
Bradley Wertheim, theAtlantic.com, Jan 10 2013
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-12 15:18:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
Either spelling is acceptable if you're in America. Now if you're on
the other side of the Atlantic Ocean i wouldn't have the foggiest
clue. Have a nice day.
This is the partiest post I've read today. I suppose it would make more
sense if we knew what it was a reply to.
If you had a decent news-viewer, you would be able to see the header,
where a silly question is asked. (You don't even need to look at the
original message from New Year's Day 2007.)
Ian Jackson
2019-11-13 16:08:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by m***@gmail.com
Either spelling is acceptable if you're in America. Now if you're on
the other side of the Atlantic Ocean i wouldn't have the foggiest
clue. Have a nice day.
This is the partiest post I've read today. I suppose it would make more
sense if we knew what it was a reply to.
A word that is used fairly often these days is "denier". When I see it
in print, I immediately think of ladies' nylon stockings and tights.
[Note that I deny that I'm a sex maniac.]
http://tinyurl.com/ydlv2bhm
--
Ian
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