Discussion:
the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins
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Lazypierrot
2019-11-04 05:28:43 UTC
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I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer origins.


Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural identity.


Cordially,

LP
Jack
2019-11-04 06:00:48 UTC
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On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is
Katy Jennison
2019-11-04 09:30:21 UTC
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Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
Also that hunting can be seen (by the author of the passage, at any
rate, and/or the supposed audience for it) as more exciting, sexier,
etc, as opposed to the dull and boring activity of gathering stuff.
--
Katy Jennison
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-04 13:01:15 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
Also that hunting can be seen (by the author of the passage, at any
rate, and/or the supposed audience for it) as more exciting, sexier,
etc, as opposed to the dull and boring activity of gathering stuff.
The latter, of course, being mere women's work -- which also, as it
happens, usually provides more calories for the band's nutrition.
Quinn C
2019-11-04 22:55:04 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer
origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective
"juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of
our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the
juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote
forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential
part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
Also that hunting can be seen (by the author of the passage, at any
rate, and/or the supposed audience for it) as more exciting, sexier,
etc, as opposed to the dull and boring activity of gathering stuff.
I wasn't able to guess that from the part in quotes alone, though.
"Juicy" let's me think of fruit before meat. So I don't think it's a
great choice of word.
--
In the old days, the complaints about the passing of the
golden age were much more sophisticated.
-- James Hogg in alt.usage.english
Quinn C
2019-11-05 17:35:56 UTC
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On Mon, 4 Nov 2019 17:55:04 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer
origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective
"juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of
our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the
juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote
forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential
part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
Also that hunting can be seen (by the author of the passage, at any
rate, and/or the supposed audience for it) as more exciting, sexier,
etc, as opposed to the dull and boring activity of gathering stuff.
I wasn't able to guess that from the part in quotes alone, though.
"Juicy" let's me think of fruit before meat. So I don't think it's a
great choice of word.
Both "juicy" and "meaty" are used in AmE without any reference to
anything edible. Someone may discuss the "juicy details" of another
couple's marriage problems, and the lawyers will get down to the
"meaty details" of the division of property.
Exactly - therefore "the juicier half of our hunter-gather origins"
could not only be hunting, or gathering, but also the sex that was had
during either of those activities. It's very open to interpretation.
--
In the old days, the complaints about the passing of the
golden age were much more sophisticated.
-- James Hogg in alt.usage.english
Tony Cooper
2019-11-05 18:58:07 UTC
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On Tue, 5 Nov 2019 12:35:56 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
On Mon, 4 Nov 2019 17:55:04 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer
origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective
"juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of
our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the
juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote
forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential
part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
Also that hunting can be seen (by the author of the passage, at any
rate, and/or the supposed audience for it) as more exciting, sexier,
etc, as opposed to the dull and boring activity of gathering stuff.
I wasn't able to guess that from the part in quotes alone, though.
"Juicy" let's me think of fruit before meat. So I don't think it's a
great choice of word.
Both "juicy" and "meaty" are used in AmE without any reference to
anything edible. Someone may discuss the "juicy details" of another
couple's marriage problems, and the lawyers will get down to the
"meaty details" of the division of property.
Exactly - therefore "the juicier half of our hunter-gather origins"
could not only be hunting, or gathering, but also the sex that was had
during either of those activities. It's very open to interpretation.
You have a vivid, if not lurid, imagination. I would say the "jucier
half" could simply be the more interesting half.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-04 14:09:41 UTC
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Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
--
Jerry Friedman
David Kleinecke
2019-11-04 20:00:53 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
There are a number of "tribes" in the Amazon basin in South
America where the women stayed home and gardened while the men
hunted. They weren't nomadic but did tend to move into new
quarters every few years. The Amazon lowlands may be full of
life but it not well-supplied with potential foodstuff for
humans.
Peter Moylan
2019-11-05 06:07:56 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer
origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective
"juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half
of our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done,
"the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote
forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential
part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter'
half juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is
juicier than vegetables.
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
In my case it's hunting. This growing season I'm determined not to let
the snails destroy all my vegetables, so each evening, after dark, I go
out with a torch to hunt them down.

It rained a couple of days ago, and I managed to catch about 20 snails.
Usually it's only one or two.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2019-11-05 12:14:05 UTC
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On Tue, 5 Nov 2019 17:07:56 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer
origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective
"juicier." I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half
of our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done,
"the juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote
forests and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential
part of the cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter'
half juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half. He's saying meat is
juicier than vegetables.
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
In my case it's hunting. This growing season I'm determined not to let
the snails destroy all my vegetables, so each evening, after dark, I go
out with a torch to hunt them down.
According to the OED the earliest sense of "hunt" is:

1.a. To go in pursuit of wild animals or game; to engage in the
chase. Also of animals: to pursue their prey.
c1000....

This sense is a couple of centuries later:

3.a. To search, seek (after or for anything), esp. with eagerness
and exertion.
Post by Peter Moylan
It rained a couple of days ago, and I managed to catch about 20 snails.
Usually it's only one or two.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-05 18:13:34 UTC
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...
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
In my case it's hunting. This growing season I'm determined not to let
the snails destroy all my vegetables, so each evening, after dark, I go
out with a torch to hunt them down.
It rained a couple of days ago, and I managed to catch about 20 snails.
Usually it's only one or two.
Do they supplement your tribe's calorie intake?

Sorry, stupid question. Of course Australian snails are poisonous.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2019-11-06 00:29:17 UTC
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On Monday, November 4, 2019 at 11:08:01 PM UTC-7, Peter Moylan
...
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
In my case it's hunting. This growing season I'm determined not to
let the snails destroy all my vegetables, so each evening, after
dark, I go out with a torch to hunt them down.
It rained a couple of days ago, and I managed to catch about 20
snails. Usually it's only one or two.
Do they supplement your tribe's calorie intake?
Sorry, stupid question. Of course Australian snails are poisonous.
I step on them, cruel person that I am. The magpies clean up the residue
the next day. The magpies appear to be healthy.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
occam
2019-11-05 08:01:48 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jack
On Sun, 3 Nov 2019 21:28:43 -0800 (PST), Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer
origins" in the following passage means, especially the adjective
"juicier."  I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of
our hunter-gatherer origins.
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the
juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests
and fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the
cultural identity.
The "hunter/gatherer" origins. The author is calling the 'hunter' half
juicier, compared to the 'gatherer' half.  He's saying meat is juicier
than vegetables.
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
It's gathering if you are human. You pick them up as you would fruit.
It's hunting if you are a slow moving animal (relative to the snail),
involving a chase.

To anticipate your next question, the description of the resulting meal
should be "juicy" rather than "meaty".
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-05 08:28:14 UTC
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<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
It's gathering if you are human. You pick them up as you would fruit.
It's hunting if you are a slow moving animal (relative to the snail),
involving a chase.
Consider a spherical snail in a vacuum.

The snail makes one orbit around the earth every 93 minutes. Its apogee
and perigee are 6881km and 6879km respectively from the earth's centre.

You may assume that the snail's shell protects it from the deleterious
consequences of the high-altitude and low-pressure aspects of its
environment.

You are in the same orbit, but you are 1km behind the snail. You are hungry.

Q1: what is your best strategy for capturing the snail?
Q2: does your answer to Q1 make you a hunter, a gatherer, both, or neither?
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-11-05 11:09:19 UTC
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Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
It's gathering if you are human. You pick them up as you would fruit.
It's hunting if you are a slow moving animal (relative to the snail),
involving a chase.
Consider a spherical snail in a vacuum.
The snail makes one orbit around the earth every 93 minutes. Its
apogee and perigee are 6881km and 6879km respectively from the earth's
centre.
You may assume that the snail's shell protects it from the deleterious
consequences of the high-altitude and low-pressure aspects of its
environment.
You are in the same orbit, but you are 1km behind the snail. You are hungry.
Q1: what is your best strategy for capturing the snail?
Q2: does your answer to Q1 make you a hunter, a gatherer, both, or neither?
This kind of question makes my blood boil.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-05 11:28:32 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
It's gathering if you are human. You pick them up as you would fruit.
It's hunting if you are a slow moving animal (relative to the snail),
involving a chase.
Consider a spherical snail in a vacuum.
The snail makes one orbit around the earth every 93 minutes. Its
apogee and perigee are 6881km and 6879km respectively from the earth's
centre.
You may assume that the snail's shell protects it from the deleterious
consequences of the high-altitude and low-pressure aspects of its
environment.
You are in the same orbit, but you are 1km behind the snail. You are hungry.
Q1: what is your best strategy for capturing the snail?
Q2: does your answer to Q1 make you a hunter, a gatherer, both, or neither?
This kind of question makes my blood boil.
If it helps, you can have a spacesuit too.

Alas, the temptation to write "consider a spherical snail" was too great
to resist.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Peter Moylan
2019-11-05 12:05:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
It's gathering if you are human. You pick them up as you would
fruit. It's hunting if you are a slow moving animal (relative to
the snail), involving a chase.
Consider a spherical snail in a vacuum.
The snail makes one orbit around the earth every 93 minutes. Its
apogee and perigee are 6881km and 6879km respectively from the
earth's centre.
You may assume that the snail's shell protects it from the
deleterious consequences of the high-altitude and low-pressure
aspects of its environment.
You are in the same orbit, but you are 1km behind the snail. You are hungry.
Q1: what is your best strategy for capturing the snail? Q2: does your
answer to Q1 make you a hunter, a gatherer, both, or neither?
May I change orbit by throwing away the snails I've already caught?

There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-05 12:14:46 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
It's gathering if you are human. You pick them up as you would
fruit. It's hunting if you are a slow moving animal (relative to
the snail), involving a chase.
Consider a spherical snail in a vacuum.
The snail makes one orbit around the earth every 93 minutes. Its
apogee and perigee are 6881km and 6879km respectively from the
earth's centre.
You may assume that the snail's shell protects it from the
deleterious consequences of the high-altitude and low-pressure
aspects of its environment.
You are in the same orbit, but you are 1km behind the snail. You are
 hungry.
Q1: what is your best strategy for capturing the snail? Q2: does your
answer to Q1 make you a hunter, a gatherer, both, or neither?
May I change orbit by throwing away the snails I've already caught?
Yes, you can change orbit (either in that way or in more traditional ways).
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.

But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
occam
2019-11-05 12:37:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
It's gathering if you are human. You pick them up as you would
fruit. It's hunting if you are a slow moving animal (relative to
the snail), involving a chase.
Consider a spherical snail in a vacuum.
The snail makes one orbit around the earth every 93 minutes. Its
apogee and perigee are 6881km and 6879km respectively from the
earth's centre.
You may assume that the snail's shell protects it from the
deleterious consequences of the high-altitude and low-pressure
aspects of its environment.
You are in the same orbit, but you are 1km behind the snail. You are
 hungry.
Q1: what is your best strategy for capturing the snail? Q2: does your
answer to Q1 make you a hunter, a gatherer, both, or neither?
May I change orbit by throwing away the snails I've already caught?
Yes, you can change orbit (either in that way or in more traditional ways).
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
What about Australian XXXX beer, or Newcastle Brown Ale (oops, wrong
Newcastle!).
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-05 13:16:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
What about Australian XXXX beer, or Newcastle Brown Ale (oops, wrong
Newcastle!).
I never tried. I, too, have standards.
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
charles
2019-11-05 13:49:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
What about Australian XXXX beer, or Newcastle Brown Ale (oops, wrong
Newcastle!).
I never tried. I, too, have standards.
what's wrong with 'Newky' - apart from the fact it's not brewed in Newcastle
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Richard Heathfield
2019-11-05 15:09:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by charles
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
What about Australian XXXX beer, or Newcastle Brown Ale (oops, wrong
Newcastle!).
I never tried. I, too, have standards.
what's wrong with 'Newky' - apart from the fact it's not brewed in Newcastle
https://xkcd.com/1534/
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Quinn C
2019-11-05 17:35:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
What about Australian XXXX beer, or Newcastle Brown Ale (oops, wrong
Newcastle!).
I never tried. I, too, have standards.
what's wrong with 'Newky' - apart from the fact it's not brewed in Newcastle
I've had it once at a place where it was the only thing on tap. I've
not ad it since, when there were other choices.
--
Who would know aught of art must learn and then take his ease.
charles
2019-11-05 17:59:42 UTC
Reply
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Post by charles
Post by Richard Heathfield
<snip>
Post by occam
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in
a box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails
will arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by
putting down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that
they dive in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and
then they drown, a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere
near Tesco own-brand.
What about Australian XXXX beer, or Newcastle Brown Ale (oops, wrong
Newcastle!).
I never tried. I, too, have standards.
what's wrong with 'Newky' - apart from the fact it's not brewed in Newcastle
I've had it once at a place where it was the only thing on tap. I've not
ad it since, when there were other choices.
never seen it on tap, it's always bottled, but I suppose in its home
territory it could be a draught beer, but the Wiki article implies it was
always a bottled product at home, but can be got in the USA from a keg..
Now brewed in the Nethrlands
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter Moylan
2019-11-05 13:43:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in
a box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails
will arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by
putting down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that
they dive in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and
then they drown, a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere
near Tesco own-brand.
Now I see where I went wrong. I tried Aldi beer. My theory was that if
it was a beer that I'd be willing to drink myself, I shouldn't waste it
on the snails. It turns out that not even slugs and snails will drink
Aldi beer.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-11-05 15:46:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 05 Nov 2019 13:43:53 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in
a box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails
will arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by
putting down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that
they dive in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and
then they drown, a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere
near Tesco own-brand.
Now I see where I went wrong. I tried Aldi beer. My theory was that if
it was a beer that I'd be willing to drink myself, I shouldn't waste it
on the snails. It turns out that not even slugs and snails will drink
Aldi beer.
Our Aldi (UK) does "Harpers" which is either Shepherd Neame or Marston's
in disguise, depending on who got the contract recently. The Marston ones
are quite fine, IMHO.

https://www.aldi.co.uk/medusa-ruby-red-ale/p/071810110551600

(Specially designed to make you want to pay £1.25 for proper Hobgoblin.)


You might also find your Aldi beer is contracted down to a price with a
local big brewer.

[If it comes in a can I can't help you].
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
charles
2019-11-05 17:29:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Tue, 05 Nov 2019 13:43:53 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in
a box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails
will arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by
putting down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that
they dive in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and
then they drown, a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere
near Tesco own-brand.
Now I see where I went wrong. I tried Aldi beer. My theory was that if
it was a beer that I'd be willing to drink myself, I shouldn't waste it
on the snails. It turns out that not even slugs and snails will drink
Aldi beer.
Our Aldi (UK) does "Harpers"
Perhaps I should stock some at the Edinburgh International Harp Festival
Bar? Is it drinkable?
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-11-05 19:24:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Tue, 05 Nov 2019 13:43:53 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden
(in a box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The
snails will arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by
putting down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much
that they dive in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)...
and then they drown, a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere
near Tesco own-brand.
Now I see where I went wrong. I tried Aldi beer. My theory was that
if it was a beer that I'd be willing to drink myself, I shouldn't
waste it on the snails. It turns out that not even slugs and snails
will drink Aldi beer.
Our Aldi (UK) does "Harpers"
Perhaps I should stock some at the Edinburgh International Harp
Festival Bar? Is it drinkable?
'Medusa' is the 'Hobgoblin' equivalent ('Dark Ruby') and "Wild Bill's" is
the supposed American IPA. I can handle both, as the price is right.
Slugs might prefer the lesser hopped Medusa.
https://www.aldi.co.uk/wild-bill%27s-ipa-ale/p/071808107966300


The "Harpers" label isn't very prominent.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-05 18:12:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[stalking snails]
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
Wow. The ones in my mother's garden liked Rolling Rock.
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-05 18:30:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
[stalking snails]
Post by Richard Heathfield
Post by Peter Moylan
There is of course one simple solution. Prepare a small garden (in a
box, or somewhere) and plant some lettuce seedlings. The snails will
arrive almost immediately.
I was once told that the best way to cure a slug problem was by putting
down bowls of beer for them. They love the beer so much that they dive
in (well, crawl in, but they're *thinking* dive)... and then they drown,
a la Duke of Clarence.
But it turns out that slugs have standards. They won't go anywhere near
Tesco own-brand.
Wow. The ones in my mother's garden liked Rolling Rock.
The slugs in my garden in Birmingham seem to have liked the beer I
brewed myself.
--
athel
Madhu
2019-11-05 13:35:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
I assume There was no collective noun for snails in the original
document which enumerated them,
Peter Moylan
2019-11-05 13:46:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madhu
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
I assume There was no collective noun for snails in the original
document which enumerated them,
That is easily checked. Does the original document contain the character
'@'?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Madhu
2019-11-06 03:10:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Madhu
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
I assume There was no collective noun for snails in the original
document which enumerated them,
That is easily checked. Does the original document contain the
I had to look this up. If I have the correct document it is at
https://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/PR-INC-00003-J-00004-00001-03636/1

But that doesn't show any images for me even when I turn on javascript.

There is an 1881 pdf at https://archive.org/details/cu31924031031184

The orthography for T looks like @
Madhu
2019-11-07 01:55:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madhu
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Madhu
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
I assume There was no collective noun for snails in the original
document which enumerated them,
That is easily checked. Does the original document contain the
I'm still wooshed. The only @ association I have is for array syntax in
some languages. What did you mean?

My comment (which admittedly was stupid) was that snail-gathering could
be deemed hunting if there was a collective noun for it - they could
then be deemed venery

The links [snipped] were to the book which apparently listed them first
in old english
Post by Madhu
I had to look this up. If I have the correct document it is at
https://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/PR-INC-00003-J-00004-00001-03636/1
But that doesn't show any images for me even when I turn on javascript.
There is an 1881 pdf at https://archive.org/details/cu31924031031184
Madhu
2019-11-07 02:06:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madhu
Post by Madhu
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Madhu
Post by Jerry Friedman
I wonder whether picking up snails is hunting or gathering.
I assume There was no collective noun for snails in the original
document which enumerated them,
That is easily checked. Does the original document contain the
some languages. What did you mean?
My comment (which admittedly was stupid) was that snail-gathering could
be deemed hunting if there was a collective noun for it - they could
then be deemed venery
The links [snipped] were to the book which apparently listed them first
in old english
Post by Madhu
I had to look this up. If I have the correct document it is at
https://cudl.lib.cam.ac.uk/view/PR-INC-00003-J-00004-00001-03636/1
But that doesn't show any images for me even when I turn on javascript.
There is an 1881 pdf at https://archive.org/details/cu31924031031184
Nevermind. @ is the orthography for a snail

Mark Brader
2019-11-04 06:03:16 UTC
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Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins"
in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier."
More appealing. It's a food metaphor.
Post by Lazypierrot
I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer
origins.
Besides hunting, the "other half" of being a hunter-gatherer is gathering
(wild plants that you can eat).
Post by Lazypierrot
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the
juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and
fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural
identity.
--
Mark Brader | "Reality aside, we would like to deploy a methodology
***@vex.net | for how Rooter might behave in theory."
Toronto | -- scigen.pl (Stribling, Krohn, and Aguayo)
Lazypierrot
2019-11-04 08:27:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins"
in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier."
More appealing. It's a food metaphor.
Post by Lazypierrot
I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer
origins.
Besides hunting, the "other half" of being a hunter-gatherer is gathering
(wild plants that you can eat).
Post by Lazypierrot
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the
juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and
fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural
identity.
--
Mark Brader | "Reality aside, we would like to deploy a methodology
Toronto | -- scigen.pl (Stribling, Krohn, and Aguayo)
I wonder if eating meat is more appealing than plants.
Or, hunting animals is more appealing than gathering plants.

Cordially,

LP
J. J. Lodder
2019-11-04 09:27:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what "juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins"
in the following passage means, especially the adjective "juicier."
More appealing. It's a food metaphor.
Post by Lazypierrot
I also wonder what is supposed to be the other half of our hunter-gatherer
origins.
Besides hunting, the "other half" of being a hunter-gatherer is gathering
(wild plants that you can eat).
Post by Lazypierrot
Hunting for dinner is of course what humans have always done, "the
juicier half of our hunter-gatherer origins". In many remote forests and
fishing villages, moreover, it remains an essential part of the cultural
identity.
--
Mark Brader | "Reality aside, we would like to deploy a methodology
Toronto | -- scigen.pl (Stribling, Krohn, and Aguayo)
I wonder if eating meat is more appealing than plants.
Or, hunting animals is more appealing than gathering plants.
You may ask the Chimps how they feel about it,

Jan
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