Discussion:
Oscar Wilde’s def. of gentleman = [ never insults another unintentionally ]
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Hen Hanna
2018-01-11 20:20:51 UTC
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Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].

AND
note: a common form of "apology" offered today is:

[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........


ALSO:
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended


please comment. Thank you. HH
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-01-11 23:44:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hen Hanna
Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].
AND
[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended
That's no way to apologise. You have to say, "I'm sorry if you
were offended" making it quite clear that it's wholly and
indisputably the other person's fault.
Hen Hanna
2018-01-11 23:51:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Hen Hanna
Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].
AND
[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended
That's no way to apologise. You have to say, "I'm sorry if you
were offended" making it quite clear that it's wholly and
indisputably the other person's fault.
yes, and also:

-- I'm sorry that you took it so personally. or

-- I had no idea that you'd take it so personally. or

-- I didn't think (that) you'd take it so personally. or ...

HH
Pavel Svinchnik
2018-01-12 03:00:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Hen Hanna
Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].
AND
[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended
please comment. Thank you. HH
My favorite definition of a gentleman is one who knows how to play the bagpipes but doesn't.

Paul
RH Draney
2018-01-12 05:07:39 UTC
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Post by Pavel Svinchnik
My favorite definition of a gentleman is one who knows how to play the bagpipes but doesn't.
The only thing wrong with that is that it's then impossible to become a
gentleman without learning to play the bagpipes....r
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-12 05:52:40 UTC
Permalink
Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].
AND
[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended
please comment. Thank you. HH
Other than to point out that Oscar never said it, what is there to
comment on?

Perhaps, that the earliest attested version is from 1905, five years
after Wilde's death.
Sam Plusnet
2018-01-19 00:39:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].
AND
[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended
please comment. Thank you. HH
Other than to point out that Oscar never said it, what is there to
comment on?
Perhaps, that the earliest attested version is from 1905, five years
after Wilde's death.
Second class stamp on the envelope?
--
Sam Plusnet
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-19 12:38:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Horace LaBadie
Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].
AND
[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended
please comment. Thank you. HH
Other than to point out that Oscar never said it, what is there to
comment on?
Perhaps, that the earliest attested version is from 1905, five years
after Wilde's death.
Second class stamp on the envelope?
AIr Mail from France before the invention of the aeroplane.
Sam Plusnet
2018-01-20 00:18:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Horace LaBadie
Oscar Wilde’s famous definition of a gentleman as
[one who never insults another unintentionally].
AND
[ No offense meant. ]
[ No offense (harm) was intended.]
[ I didn't intend any harm by it.] ........
a person who's usually considered
[too sensitive], touchy, ....
is when he/she is
Taking Offense When None Is Intended
please comment. Thank you. HH
Other than to point out that Oscar never said it, what is there to
comment on?
Perhaps, that the earliest attested version is from 1905, five years
after Wilde's death.
Second class stamp on the envelope?
AIr Mail from France before the invention of the aeroplane.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_Channel_crossings_by_air

First crossing of the channel by air was in 1785 - but the service was
somewhat infrequent until around 1910 or so.
--
Sam Plusnet
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