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bozodeniro@google.com
2018-07-12 00:35:05 UTC
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Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Peter Young
2018-07-12 06:33:43 UTC
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Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Something to do with its being very hot?

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-12 11:26:34 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Something to do with its being very hot?
Hot, hot, hot .... and gooey so it makes more contact with the tissue and
adheres.
RHDraney
2018-07-12 15:22:23 UTC
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Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Because that's where you put it...if you put it in your shoes, it'll
burn your feet instead....r
Jack
2018-07-12 16:12:30 UTC
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Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Whatever you've melted the cheese onto is cooler, and protects your
tongue, which itself protects the bottom of your mouth.
--
John
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-12 16:16:49 UTC
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Post by Jack
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Whatever you've melted the cheese onto is cooler, and protects your
tongue, which itself protects the bottom of your mouth.
--
Ah, specific heat capacity's a bitch!
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-14 15:52:51 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Jack
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Whatever you've melted the cheese onto is cooler, and protects your
tongue, which itself protects the bottom of your mouth.
--
Ah, specific heat capacity's a bitch!
You're confusing different things. Specific heat and heat capacity are
not the same -- the first is intensive, whereas the second is
extensive. The specific heat of water is the same (more or less)
whether you're talking about a teaspoonful or Lake Superior, but the
heat capacities are very different.
--
athel
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-14 16:27:22 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Jack
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Whatever you've melted the cheese onto is cooler, and protects your
tongue, which itself protects the bottom of your mouth.
--
Ah, specific heat capacity's a bitch!
You're confusing different things. Specific heat and heat capacity are
not the same -- the first is intensive, whereas the second is
extensive. The specific heat of water is the same (more or less)
whether you're talking about a teaspoonful or Lake Superior, but the
heat capacities are very different.
Yup. Evidently my typing fingers ran away with me.
Peter Moylan
2018-07-15 14:02:13 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
On Wed, 11 Jul 2018 17:35:05 -0700 (PDT),
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Whatever you've melted the cheese onto is cooler, and protects
your tongue, which itself protects the bottom of your mouth.
--
Ah, specific heat capacity's a bitch!
You're confusing different things. Specific heat and heat capacity
are not the same -- the first is intensive, whereas the second is
extensive. The specific heat of water is the same (more or less)
whether you're talking about a teaspoonful or Lake Superior, but the
heat capacities are very different.
When it's chili, on the other hand, a teaspoonful can feel like Lake
Superior. I got caught that way yesterday, in an innocent-looking salad.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-15 16:10:29 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
On Wed, 11 Jul 2018 17:35:05 -0700 (PDT),
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Whatever you've melted the cheese onto is cooler, and protects
your tongue, which itself protects the bottom of your mouth.
--
Ah, specific heat capacity's a bitch!
You're confusing different things. Specific heat and heat capacity
are not the same -- the first is intensive, whereas the second is
extensive. The specific heat of water is the same (more or less)
whether you're talking about a teaspoonful or Lake Superior, but the
heat capacities are very different.
When it's chili, on the other hand, a teaspoonful can feel like Lake
Superior. I got caught that way yesterday, in an innocent-looking salad.
I was caught that way many times the first time I was in Turkey, as a
student in the 1960s. We tended to eat salads every day at lunch, as
they were cheaper than shish kebab etc. There would be two chilis in
the salad that would look absolutely identical, but one would be as hot
as a bell pepper and the other as hot as a jalapeño.
--
athel
Ken Blake
2018-07-12 17:45:16 UTC
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Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Because you put the bread in your mouth with the melted cheese side
up. Put it in the other way and it will burn the bottom of your mouth.
John Varela
2018-07-12 21:36:23 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Because you put the bread in your mouth with the melted cheese side
up. Put it in the other way and it will burn the bottom of your mouth.
No, it will burn your tongue. As already pointed out by Jack.

Related question:

It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the roof
of your mouth. That hasn't happened to be in years, even though all
the pizza places these days boast about their fancy brick
mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from Italy.

How come is that?
--
John Varela
the Omrud
2018-07-13 16:53:39 UTC
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Post by John Varela
Post by Ken Blake
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Because you put the bread in your mouth with the melted cheese side
up. Put it in the other way and it will burn the bottom of your mouth.
No, it will burn your tongue. As already pointed out by Jack.
It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the roof
of your mouth. That hasn't happened to be in years, even though all
the pizza places these days boast about their fancy brick
mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from Italy.
How come is that?
The roof of your mouth has got older and tougher.
--
David
John Varela
2018-07-13 23:54:54 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by John Varela
Post by Ken Blake
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Because you put the bread in your mouth with the melted cheese side
up. Put it in the other way and it will burn the bottom of your mouth.
No, it will burn your tongue. As already pointed out by Jack.
It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the roof
of your mouth. That hasn't happened to me in years, even though all
the pizza places these days boast about their fancy brick
mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from Italy.
How come is that?
The roof of your mouth has got older and tougher.
The former is true for sure. I'll have to check with a grandson to
see if he burns the roof of his mouth.

ObAUE: I would have written "has gotten" but you already knew that.
--
John Varela
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-07-16 10:30:43 UTC
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Post by John Varela
Post by the Omrud
Post by John Varela
Post by Ken Blake
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Because you put the bread in your mouth with the melted cheese
side up. Put it in the other way and it will burn the bottom of
your mouth.
No, it will burn your tongue. As already pointed out by Jack.
It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the
roof of your mouth. That hasn't happened to me in years, even
though all the pizza places these days boast about their fancy
brick mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from
Italy.
How come is that?
The roof of your mouth has got older and tougher.
The former is true for sure. I'll have to check with a grandson to
see if he burns the roof of his mouth.
ObAUE: I would have written "has gotten" but you already knew that.
In BrE "has gotten" looks and sounds dreadful; "has become", perhaps
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-16 11:30:47 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by John Varela
Post by the Omrud
Post by John Varela
Post by Ken Blake
Post by ***@google.com
Why does melted cheese burn the top of your Mouth?
Because you put the bread in your mouth with the melted cheese
side up. Put it in the other way and it will burn the bottom of
your mouth.
No, it will burn your tongue. As already pointed out by Jack.
It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the
roof of your mouth. That hasn't happened to me in years, even
though all the pizza places these days boast about their fancy
brick mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from
Italy.
How come is that?
The roof of your mouth has got older and tougher.
The former is true for sure. I'll have to check with a grandson to
see if he burns the roof of his mouth.
ObAUE: I would have written "has gotten" but you already knew that.
In BrE "has gotten" looks and sounds dreadful; "has become", perhaps
Nonsense. BrE is more than robust enough. Tales of 'gotten' extinction
in BrE are wildly exaggerated. Don't tar us all with your own
snowflakiness.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-07-16 20:19:52 UTC
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On Mon, 16 Jul 2018 11:30:47 GMT, Madrigal Gurneyhalt
[]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by John Varela
ObAUE: I would have written "has gotten" but you already knew that.
In BrE "has gotten" looks and sounds dreadful; "has become", perhaps
Nonsense. BrE is more than robust enough. Tales of 'gotten' extinction
in BrE are wildly exaggerated. Don't tar us all with your own
snowflakiness.
Snowflakes are so last year. IIRC the leftpondian Dr Seuss railed against
"Got".
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
RHDraney
2018-07-16 13:50:46 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
In BrE "has gotten" looks and sounds dreadful; "has become", perhaps
"The time has came, the Walrus said"....r
John Dunlop
2018-07-17 11:35:35 UTC
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In BrE "has gotten" looks and sounds dreadful; [...]
To some, maybe, not to everyone. I think it's fine colloquial English.

Many people seem to regard "gotten" as an Americanism, which might
colour their judgement.
--
John
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-14 16:03:36 UTC
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[ … ]
Post by John Varela
It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the roof
of your mouth. That hasn't happened to be in years, even though all
the pizza places these days boast about their fancy brick
mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from Italy.
We went to a brand-new Italian restaurant last night (second day of its
existence). We had their "speciality", lasagna. It was OK, but nothing
to write home about. We didn't have a pizza, but the people at the next
table did, and we asked them how it was (I forgot to ask if it burned
the roofs of their mouths): they said it was OK but no better than the
take-away pizza place down the road. They have away to go if they're
going to succeed. I don't think anyone working there is Italian.

Incidentally, for Quinn's benefit I should add that I asked for "un
café", not "une tasse de café". Has he understood yet that the terms
one uses for ordering coffee in a restaurant are different from those
one uses when buying an espresso machine?
--
athel
charles
2018-07-14 17:21:02 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ Π]
Post by John Varela
It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the roof
of your mouth. That hasn't happened to be in years, even though all
the pizza places these days boast about their fancy brick
mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from Italy.
We went to a brand-new Italian restaurant last night (second day of its
existence). We had their "speciality", lasagna. It was OK, but nothing
to write home about. We didn't have a pizza, but the people at the next
table did, and we asked them how it was (I forgot to ask if it burned
the roofs of their mouths): they said it was OK but no better than the
take-away pizza place down the road. They have away to go if they're
going to succeed. I don't think anyone working there is Italian.
Incidentally, for Quinn's benefit I should add that I asked for "un
café", not "une tasse de café".
I thought you said an "Italian "restaurant. Those would be French terms,
but, I suppose, one foreign language is very like another.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
--
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-15 07:33:08 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ Π]
Post by John Varela
It used to be that a pizza fresh out of the oven would burn the roof
of your mouth. That hasn't happened to be in years, even though all
the pizza places these days boast about their fancy brick
mesquite-burning super pizza super-hot ovens imported from Italy.
We went to a brand-new Italian restaurant last night (second day of its
existence). We had their "speciality", lasagna. It was OK, but nothing
to write home about. We didn't have a pizza, but the people at the next
table did, and we asked them how it was (I forgot to ask if it burned
the roofs of their mouths): they said it was OK but no better than the
take-away pizza place down the road. They have away to go if they're
going to succeed. I don't think anyone working there is Italian.
Incidentally, for Quinn's benefit I should add that I asked for "un
café", not "une tasse de café".
I thought you said an "Italian "restaurant.
That's what it claims to be. Once we had eaten there we realized that
that is a misnomer. However, even if it were really Italian they'd need
to be able to communicate with their customers in French. We have an
Armenian restaurant very close (run by real Armenians) but they talk to
us in French.
Post by charles
Those would be French terms,
but, I suppose, one foreign language is very like another.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
--
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2018-07-15 16:43:57 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
I thought you said an "Italian "restaurant.
That's what it claims to be. Once we had eaten there we realized that
that is a misnomer. However, even if it were really Italian they'd
need to be able to communicate with their customers in French. We
have an Armenian restaurant very close (run by real Armenians) but
they talk to us in French.
When I lived for a short time in Paris, there was a Turkish restaurant
on the ground floor of my apartment building. I ate there a couple of
times. It was interesting having a conversation where French was a
foreign language for the two of us. The shared foreignness was probably
the factor that allowed him to explain the problems of being a Turk in
France.

It reminded me of a time I was in Tunisia, and (because of an accident)
had to take a taxi to find a pharmacy. The taxi driver explained to me
that for him "l'arabe est le francais" (Arabic is French), i.e. he knew
Arabic as an international language, so again we were speaking in a
language that was foreign to the two of us.

Elsewhere, I've only had serious language problems in Korea. (Where I
found that sign language isn't all that it's cracked up to be.) In
Hungary and Czechoslovakia I found people who could understand English.
Likewise for the Netherlands, where everyone seems to speak English. In
Germany I got by with a mixture of German and English words. In northern
Belgium ... well, I'll admit that was a bit of a problem. Ik spreek een
klein beetje nederlands, but it was not enough to survive in that region
where they detest you if you have even the slightest French accent. But
I survived anyway.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Moylan
2018-07-15 16:14:04 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
We went to a brand-new Italian restaurant last night (second day of
its existence).
As it happened (AIWMTH) we also went to an Italian restaurant last
night. It was in Taree, several hours' drive north of here. We just
happened to be in the area after visiting friends.

When delivering the food, the waiter (who was, I suspect, the owner)
said "Prego", so I automatically said "Grazie". What is it in us that
automatically switches us to the language of our interlocuteur?

We found that restaurant because my wife asked someone, in another town
along our route, to recommend a restaurant in Taree. She recommended the
"Silicone". I was the one who later noticed that the "Siciliano" had a
similar name.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-16 20:58:33 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
We went to a brand-new Italian restaurant last night (second day of
its existence).
As it happened (AIWMTH) we also went to an Italian restaurant last
night. It was in Taree, several hours' drive north of here. We just
happened to be in the area after visiting friends.
When delivering the food, the waiter (who was, I suspect, the owner)
said "Prego", so I automatically said "Grazie". What is it in us that
automatically switches us to the language of our interlocuteur?
Whatever it is, it was avoided by the man at a really Mexican restaurant
here the other day. When I picked up my take-out order, it was wrapped
in anonymous foil, so I said, "¿Burrito de deshebrada?" He said, in
tones perhaps suggesting annoyance, "Yeah." I automatically said
"Gracias" anyway.
Post by Peter Moylan
We found that restaurant because my wife asked someone, in another town
along our route, to recommend a restaurant in Taree. She recommended the
"Silicone". I was the one who later noticed that the "Siciliano" had a
similar name.
:-)
--
Jerry Friedman
B***@37.com
2018-07-17 01:03:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
We went to a brand-new Italian restaurant last night (second day of
its existence).
As it happened (AIWMTH) we also went to an Italian restaurant last
night. It was in Taree, several hours' drive north of here. We just
happened to be in the area after visiting friends.
When delivering the food, the waiter (who was, I suspect, the owner)
said "Prego", so I automatically said "Grazie". What is it in us that
automatically switches us to the language of our interlocuteur?
Whatever it is, it was avoided by the man at a really Mexican restaurant
here the other day. When I picked up my take-out order, it was wrapped
in anonymous foil, so I said, "¿Burrito de deshebrada?" He said, in
tones perhaps suggesting annoyance, "Yeah." I automatically said
"Gracias" anyway.
Post by Peter Moylan
We found that restaurant because my wife asked someone, in another town
along our route, to recommend a restaurant in Taree. She recommended the
"Silicone". I was the one who later noticed that the "Siciliano" had a
similar name.
:-)
--
Jerry Friedman
Speaking of anonymous aluminum foil, what do they call those really tiny but upscale aluminum "doggy bags" that hold your fillets and fries shaped so deftly into elegant little swans?
b***@gmail.com
2018-07-17 07:28:01 UTC
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always come last?
jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
2018-07-17 18:20:03 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
always come last?
Hay bonzo, you illiterate demented jew a"h...in soc.culture.israel you
don't post any more?

- -

" I don't even have the heart to tell him I've never infested
Arizona."
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), acknowledging that he lied
from the very beginning, A jew scam, as expected

" My real name's McGill. The jew thing I just do for the homeboys.
They all want a pipe hitting member of the tribe, so to speak."
- Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk). "Better Call Saul" (2015)

"Die Juden sind unser Unglück!"
- Heinrich von Treitschke (1834 - 1896)

"But vhere vill ve be able to vatch gay jews taking black cock up ze
ass?"
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), bemoaning the depletion of jews
in Hollyvood and the effect on his viewing preferences
Message-ID: <***@4ax.com>
Peeler
2018-07-17 18:45:20 UTC
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On Tue, 17 Jul 2018 11:20:03 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by b***@gmail.com
always come last?
Hay bonzo, you illiterate demented jew a"h...in soc.culture.israel you
don't post any more?
Hey, Retardovic, you got a hang-up about Jews? How come? <VBG>
--
Dumb anal Razovic's talking about her experience, on July 2nd, 2018:
"Suck a jew rectum hard enough and diarrhoea will come out!"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
bozodeniro@gmail.com
2018-07-16 20:46:28 UTC
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Why do people avoid perfectly good leftovers of prepared food like pizza, sandwiches, and foie gras in specially prepared little boxes that used to be called doggie Bags?
b***@gmail.com
2018-07-18 05:32:21 UTC
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Alt.Sausage.English?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-18 10:51:23 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Alt.Sausage.English?
That's the wurst idea you've ever had!
jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
2018-07-19 14:20:44 UTC
Reply
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Alt.Sausage.English?
Piss orf, bonzo, you meshuggah AIDS-ridden jew a"h!

- -

" I don't even have the heart to tell him I've never infested
Arizona."
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), acknowledging that he lied
from the very beginning, A jew scam, as expected

" My real name's McGill. The jew thing I just do for the homeboys.
They all want a pipe hitting member of the tribe, so to speak."
- Saul Goodman (Bob Odenkirk). "Better Call Saul" (2015)

"Die Juden sind unser Unglück!"
- Heinrich von Treitschke (1834 - 1896)

"But vhere vill ve be able to vatch gay jews taking black cock up ze
ass?"
- Klaun Shittinb'ricks (1940 - ), bemoaning the depletion of jews
in Hollyvood and the effect on his viewing preferences
Message-ID: <***@4ax.com>
Peeler
2018-07-19 16:24:57 UTC
Reply
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On Thu, 19 Jul 2018 07:20:44 -0700, serbian bitch Razovic, the resident
psychopath of sci and scj and Usenet's famous sexual cripple, making an ass
of herself as "jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry'
Post by jew pedophile Ron Jacobson (jew pedophile Baruch 'Barry' Shein's jew aliash)
Post by b***@gmail.com
Alt.Sausage.English?
Piss orf, bonzo, you meshuggah AIDS-ridden jew a"h!
He can piss in your shiteating gob, if you want, dreckserb Razovic!
--
Dumb anal Razovic's confession on June 30th, 2018:
"Oh no I got a jew hair in my mouth from sucking jew ani"
MID: <***@4ax.com>
b***@gmail.com
2018-07-22 20:37:20 UTC
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Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to assure a questionably engaged listener they understand precisely what's being said or has it always been just a Beatles lyric?

Stefan Ram
2018-07-22 20:52:28 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to
assure a questionably engaged listener they understand
precisely what's being said or has it always been just a
Beatles lyric?
"Yeah, yeah, yeah" is a fortifying pronunciation of "yeah"
(meaning "yes").

It sounds more cheerful and exited than depressed, because
the repetition seems to express a raised level of energy.
Joseph C. Fineman
2018-07-22 21:19:43 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to
assure a questionably engaged listener they understand
precisely what's being said or has it always been just a
Beatles lyric?
"Yeah, yeah, yeah" is a fortifying pronunciation of "yeah"
(meaning "yes").
It sounds more cheerful and exited than depressed, because
the repetition seems to express a raised level of energy.
That would surely depend on the tone of voice. Spoken with declining
volume, it would strike me as sarcastic.
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: Penis envy: the theory that a woman wishes she had a prick :||
||: until she marries one. :||
Tak To
2018-07-23 19:43:05 UTC
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Post by Joseph C. Fineman
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to
assure a questionably engaged listener they understand
precisely what's being said or has it always been just a
Beatles lyric?
"Yeah, yeah, yeah" is a fortifying pronunciation of "yeah"
(meaning "yes").
It sounds more cheerful and exited than depressed, because
the repetition seems to express a raised level of energy.
That would surely depend on the tone of voice. Spoken with declining
volume, it would strike me as sarcastic.
The slow "yeah, yeah" is sarcastic[1] but the quick three "yeah yeah
yeah" is a brush-off.

[1] and has been as an example of "double positive indicating
negative".

The happy three "yeah yeah yeah" seems to be more common in
lyrics or otherwise written down than in conversations. The
Turtles had "Let's get together yeah-yeah-yeah".
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
RHDraney
2018-07-23 22:25:42 UTC
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Post by Tak To
The happy three "yeah yeah yeah" seems to be more common in
lyrics or otherwise written down than in conversations. The
Turtles had "Let's get together yeah-yeah-yeah".
Are you thinking of the Youngbloods' "Get Together", the Beatles "Come
Together", or Canned Heat's "Let's Work Together"?...surely not "Let's
Get Together" sung by Hayley Mills in "The Parent Trap" (and reprised by
Lindsay Lohan in the remake)?...r
Tak To
2018-07-24 23:01:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RHDraney
Post by Tak To
The happy three "yeah yeah yeah" seems to be more common in
lyrics or otherwise written down than in conversations. The
Turtles had "Let's get together yeah-yeah-yeah".
Are you thinking of the Youngbloods' "Get Together", the Beatles "Come
Together", or Canned Heat's "Let's Work Together"?...surely not "Let's
Get Together" sung by Hayley Mills in "The Parent Trap" (and reprised by
Lindsay Lohan in the remake)?...r
You're right, it's the Sherman Brothers/Hayley Mills song.
For some reason I conflated it with The Turtles' "Happy
Together".
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
RHDraney
2018-07-25 06:16:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by RHDraney
Post by Tak To
The happy three "yeah yeah yeah" seems to be more common in
lyrics or otherwise written down than in conversations. The
Turtles had "Let's get together yeah-yeah-yeah".
Are you thinking of the Youngbloods' "Get Together", the Beatles "Come
Together", or Canned Heat's "Let's Work Together"?...surely not "Let's
Get Together" sung by Hayley Mills in "The Parent Trap" (and reprised by
Lindsay Lohan in the remake)?...r
You're right, it's the Sherman Brothers/Hayley Mills song.
For some reason I conflated it with The Turtles' "Happy
Together".
In addition to these cases where the word appears in the title, I've
been known to assert that the word used most in excess of statistical
likelihood in songs of my youth is not "love" but "together"....r
CDB
2018-07-22 22:28:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to assure
a questionably engaged listener they understand precisely what's
being said or has it always been just a Beatles lyric?
http://youtu.be/BOuu88OwdK8
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Stefan Ram
2018-07-22 22:41:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
CDB
2018-07-23 01:33:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break,
the TA was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah,
yeah, yeah", but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
There are people here who can answer you, being familiar with Japanese,
as I am not. "Shi" means "it is", I suppose, or maybe "so be it" (like
English "yes" from "gea swa"); but it is used for "yes".
the Omrud
2018-07-23 09:34:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
OTOH, there seems to be no Japanese word for "no", at least not one they
are prepared to use. This leaks into English, where they don't like to
say "no". We had to learn that phrases such as: "We will consider your
suggestion" and "That may be difficult" were actually refusals.
--
David
Tak To
2018-07-23 19:52:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
OTOH, there seems to be no Japanese word for "no", at least not one they
are prepared to use.
There is いえ.
Post by the Omrud
This leaks into English, where they don't like to
say "no". We had to learn that phrases such as: "We will consider your
suggestion" and "That may be difficult" were actually refusals.
This is not an issue of having words that mean "no" but one of
avoiding direct contradiction with peers and superiors.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
the Omrud
2018-07-23 21:32:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by the Omrud
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
OTOH, there seems to be no Japanese word for "no", at least not one they
are prepared to use.
There is いえ.
Post by the Omrud
This leaks into English, where they don't like to
say "no". We had to learn that phrases such as: "We will consider your
suggestion" and "That may be difficult" were actually refusals.
This is not an issue of having words that mean "no" but one of
avoiding direct contradiction with peers and superiors.
With almost anybody, IME.
--
David
Tak To
2018-07-25 18:12:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Tak To
Post by the Omrud
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
OTOH, there seems to be no Japanese word for "no", at least not one they
are prepared to use.
There is いえ.
Post by the Omrud
This leaks into English, where they don't like to
say "no". We had to learn that phrases such as: "We will consider your
suggestion" and "That may be difficult" were actually refusals.
This is not an issue of having words that mean "no" but one of
avoiding direct contradiction with peers and superiors.
With almost anybody, IME.
Even to one's own kids?
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
the Omrud
2018-07-25 18:44:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by the Omrud
Post by Tak To
Post by the Omrud
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
OTOH, there seems to be no Japanese word for "no", at least not one they
are prepared to use.
There is いえ.
Post by the Omrud
This leaks into English, where they don't like to
say "no". We had to learn that phrases such as: "We will consider your
suggestion" and "That may be difficult" were actually refusals.
This is not an issue of having words that mean "no" but one of
avoiding direct contradiction with peers and superiors.
With almost anybody, IME.
Even to one's own kids?
My Japanese colleagues never introduced me to their children.
--
David
RHDraney
2018-07-23 22:27:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
Post by the Omrud
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by CDB
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
Like the japanese "はい" ("hai")?
OTOH, there seems to be no Japanese word for "no", at least not one they
are prepared to use.
There is いえ.
More idiomatically perhaps, there's "chigau" (lit. "it differs") when
you disagree with what has been said....r
Tak To
2018-07-23 19:34:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to assure
a questionably engaged listener they understand precisely what's
being said or has it always been just a Beatles lyric?
http://youtu.be/BOuu88OwdK8
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the TA
was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah, yeah",
but more decorous and engaged.
"Shi-shi-shi-shi-shi" is not a common Chinese expression. My
guess is that the Chinese TA's were saying a series of
是 <shi4>'s (meaning "yes", not "yeah"). However, more than
two in a row sound marginally obsequious and five is definitely
excessively.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
RHDraney
2018-07-23 22:34:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tak To
"Shi-shi-shi-shi-shi" is not a common Chinese expression. My
guess is that the Chinese TA's were saying a series of
是 <shi4>'s (meaning "yes", not "yeah"). However, more than
two in a row sound marginally obsequious and five is definitely
excessively.
And fifteen in a row gets "I'll have what she's having" from the next
table....r
CDB
2018-07-24 05:44:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to
assure a questionably engaged listener they understand precisely
what's being said or has it always been just a Beatles lyric?
http://youtu.be/BOuu88OwdK8
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the
TA was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah,
yeah", but more decorous and engaged.
"Shi-shi-shi-shi-shi" is not a common Chinese expression. My guess
is that the Chinese TA's were saying a series of 是 <shi4>'s (meaning
"yes", not "yeah"). However, more than two in a row sound marginally
obsequious and five is definitely excessively.
Yes, I assumed the TA was saying "yes", and that was the only time I
observed such a string of them. She did seem nervous, and I assumed
tentatively that the prof had been in the classroom to evaluate her
performance.

As for "yeah", please note that I was responding to the boso, whose word
it was. His questions are rarely put seriously, and I don't feel
obliged to treat them as if they were.
b***@gmail.com
2018-07-26 07:53:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to
assure a questionably engaged listener they understand precisely
what's being said or has it always been just a Beatles lyric?
http://youtu.be/BOuu88OwdK8
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the
TA was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah,
yeah", but more decorous and engaged.
"Shi-shi-shi-shi-shi" is not a common Chinese expression. My guess
is that the Chinese TA's were saying a series of 是 <shi4>'s (meaning
"yes", not "yeah"). However, more than two in a row sound marginally
obsequious and five is definitely excessively.
Yes, I assumed the TA was saying "yes", and that was the only time I
observed such a string of them. She did seem nervous, and I assumed
tentatively that the prof had been in the classroom to evaluate her
performance.
As for "yeah", please note that I was responding to the boso, whose word
it was. His questions are rarely put seriously, and I don't feel
obliged to treat them as if they were.
Yeah yeah yeah but why is Tosca a scorned woman, and why do all the best roles in opera always go to the people who can sing?
Snidely
2018-07-28 08:19:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by CDB
Post by CDB
Post by b***@gmail.com
Is yeah-yeah-yeah just an emotional expression people use to
assure a questionably engaged listener they understand precisely
what's being said or has it always been just a Beatles lyric?
http://youtu.be/BOuu88OwdK8
I once observed a teaching assistant getting instructions from a
professor, both of them Chinese. Every time there was a break, the
TA was all "shi-shi-shi-shi-shi". That's Chinese for "Yeah, yeah,
yeah", but more decorous and engaged.
"Shi-shi-shi-shi-shi" is not a common Chinese expression. My guess
is that the Chinese TA's were saying a series of 是 <shi4>'s (meaning
"yes", not "yeah"). However, more than two in a row sound marginally
obsequious and five is definitely excessively.
Yes, I assumed the TA was saying "yes", and that was the only time I
observed such a string of them. She did seem nervous, and I assumed
tentatively that the prof had been in the classroom to evaluate her
performance.
As for "yeah", please note that I was responding to the boso, whose word
it was. His questions are rarely put seriously, and I don't feel
obliged to treat them as if they were.
Yeah yeah yeah but why is Tosca a scorned woman, and why do all the best
roles in opera always go to the people who can sing?
She isn't a scorned woman. Her problem is her boyfriend's enemy is the
chief of police, who thinks Tosca is a spoil of war.

/dps
--
Who, me? And what lacuna?
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-01 02:42:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Compelling questions about TIME as in...

"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"

OR

"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-01 03:23:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
The former.
bill van
2018-08-01 03:57:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Neither. "Is it effing Wednesday already?"

bill
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-01 10:48:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Neither. "Is it effing Wednesday already?"
bill
I've heard of Fish Fridays and Taco Tuesdays, but effing Wednesdays?! -- Man where do I go to sign up?
CDB
2018-08-01 15:06:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by bill van
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Neither. "Is it effing Wednesday already?"
I've heard of Fish Fridays and Taco Tuesdays, but effing Wednesdays?!
-- Man where do I go to sign up?
As it happens, the barrel is unoccupied right now.
RHDraney
2018-08-01 15:15:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by bill van
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Neither. "Is it effing Wednesday already?"
I've heard of Fish Fridays and Taco Tuesdays, but effing Wednesdays?! -- Man where do I go to sign up?
You've never heard of "hump day"?...r
Jack
2018-08-01 18:57:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Post by bill van
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Neither. "Is it effing Wednesday already?"
bill
I've heard of Fish Fridays and Taco Tuesdays, but effing Wednesdays?! -- Man where do I go to sign up?
It's either uptown or downtown. In either case, go to town.
--
John
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-02 20:32:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
            OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Neither. "Is it effing Wednesday already?"
bill
False.
Wednesdays are ineffable.
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter Moylan
2018-08-03 02:23:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by bill van
Post by b***@gmail.com
Compelling questions about TIME as in...
"Is it already effing Wednesday?!"
OR
"Is it effing already Wednesday!?"
Neither. "Is it effing Wednesday already?"
False.
Wednesdays are ineffable.
Inscrutable, even.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-02 00:57:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Do it be Queer Anonymous or Q-Clarence? Inquiring minds wanna Know.
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-02 01:14:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
Do it be Queer Anonymous or Q-Clarence? Inquiring minds wanna Know.
https://www.dailydot.com/layer8/who-is-q-anon/
b***@gmail.com
2018-08-02 01:42:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I discovered after all these years I had conflated Thomas Jefferson with Ben Franklin; and what with Sally Hemings in the news and all, it just conflated and consolidated even more. I knew what the two revolutionary white guys looked like from their portraits, but I just figured the short squat Ben Franklin would be the one to take up with Sally Hemings and not the more good looking TJ? -- Just shows you how much history I know, eh -- Go figure.
RHDraney
2018-08-02 05:37:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
I discovered after all these years I had conflated Thomas Jefferson with Ben Franklin; and what with Sally Hemings in the news and all, it just conflated and consolidated even more. I knew what the two revolutionary white guys looked like from their portraits, but I just figured the short squat Ben Franklin would be the one to take up with Sally Hemings and not the more good looking TJ? -- Just shows you how much history I know, eh -- Go figure.
Jefferson was the good-looking one...among figures now on US currency,
the only other one who was even a little bit presentable was Andrew
Jackson, and that's just because he had really good hair....

(Franklin was a notorious horndog, and apparently a very successful
one)....r
B***@37.com
2018-08-26 06:23:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
and does it apply to the movies?
CDB
2018-08-26 12:41:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
and does it apply to the movies?
"Tell me about it," George said, meaning the opposite. -- John Crowley
B***@37.com
2018-08-27 08:28:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"Forget about it" Mean?
Peter Young
2018-08-27 10:51:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?
It means forget about it.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Au)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-08-27 13:52:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?
Here some definitions:
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/forget-about-it

forget (about) it

informal used to say that something that happened was not important
or not something to worry about:
"I’m sorry I was late." "Forget it."

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/forget-it

You say 'Forget it' in reply to someone as a way of telling them not
to worry or bother about something, or as an emphatic way of saying
no to a suggestion.
[spoken, formulae]
'Sorry, Liz. I think I was a bit rude to you.'—'Forget it, but don't
do it again!'
COBUILD Advanced English Dictionary. Copyright © HarperCollins
Publishers

forget it! in American
US
never mind! it doesn't matter!
Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition. Copyright ©
2010 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2018-08-27 13:56:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?
If you enunciate it that way, it means you are not from New York or
New Jersey.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ken Blake
2018-08-27 15:16:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 27 Aug 2018 09:56:00 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?
If you enunciate it that way, it means you are not from New York or
New Jersey.
Don't you mean New Yawk or New Joisy?
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-27 15:20:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?

B***@37.com
2018-08-28 04:59:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?
http://youtu.be/44PfcCmfY-0
Oh oh oh! You mean "Fuggetaboutit" —— why intchusayso!
bill van
2018-08-28 06:28:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?
http://youtu.be/44PfcCmfY-0
Oh oh oh! You mean "Fuggetaboutit" —— why intchusayso!
There's a whole nother meme from the movie Chinatown. At the end of the
movie, the cop says to Jack Nicholson's private eye: "Forget it, Jake.
It's Chinatown."

A great noir moment, even in colour.

bill
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-28 15:32:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by B***@37.com
"Forget about it" Mean?
http://youtu.be/44PfcCmfY-0
Oh oh oh! You mean "Fuggetaboutit" —— why intchusayso!
There's a whole nother meme from the movie Chinatown. At the end of the
movie, the cop says to Jack Nicholson's private eye: "Forget it, Jake.
It's Chinatown."
A great noir moment, even in colour.
Best line is from the sequel, "The Two Jakes".

Gittes: "I'm trying to be a gentleman here. Now, get on your knees,
put your ass in the air, and don't move until I say to."
B***@37.com
2018-09-06 20:05:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
...and can you be skinned alive for your Pleather?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-06 21:22:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
...and can you be skinned alive for your Pleather?
Pleather comes from a breed of cattle kept by Scottish farmers under
licence from the Thane of Polyura.
b***@aol.com
2018-09-09 14:21:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
...and can you be skinned alive for your Pleather?
For your displeather, rather.
B***@37.com
2018-09-07 20:54:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
what would happen if they only got paid for one or the Other?
B***@37.com
2018-09-09 05:02:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
How do you know what looks like a "recent" movie is before cells Phones?
B***@37.com
2018-09-09 05:47:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
What's the difference between Blunt Force Trauma and Blunt Force Drama?
b***@gmail.com
2018-09-16 02:48:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
what does the M mean?
RHDraney
2018-09-16 04:12:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
Six....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-16 12:51:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RHDraney
Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
Six....r
If one had paid attention while watching the movie last night -- Bozo has
just revealed that s/he's within the NYC media market, since Thirteen
doesn't carry PBS's Saturday night network programming -- one would have
noticed that the telephone number in the plot begins with "6."

Or else it's an amazing coincidence; this isn't the first time Bozo has
referenced something on local NYC TV.
Peter Moylan
2018-09-16 10:28:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
One thousand.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
charles
2018-09-16 10:48:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
One thousand.
no, that 'm'; 'M' is a million in SI units. But you were right if it was
in Latin
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
B***@37.com
2018-09-16 13:35:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
and why would anybody wanna kill their wife, least of all if she was Grace Kelly?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-16 13:44:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by B***@37.com
Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
and why would anybody wanna kill their wife, least of all if she was Grace Kelly?
Did you really not pay attention at all? For the money! And it's just
possible that Ray Milland was more unhappy than he let on about her
affair with Bob Cummings.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-16 15:37:27 UTC
Reply
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Post by B***@37.com
Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
and why would anybody wanna kill their wife, least of all if she was Grace Kelly?
I'd have been much better off killing mine rather than letting her divorce me,
Grace Kelly or not!
GordonD
2018-09-16 16:35:38 UTC
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Post by b***@gmail.com
what does the M mean?
James Bond's boss. If you want somebody killed, ring M and s/he'll
assign Bond to deal with it.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
B***@37.com
2018-09-22 08:23:30 UTC
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Why is Shit Disturber so Funny?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-22 11:49:54 UTC
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Post by B***@37.com
Why is Shit Disturber so Funny?
Funny to whom? Zero effect on me, and I could use a good laugh!
B***@37.com
2018-09-24 13:05:49 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by B***@37.com
Why is Shit Disturber so Funny?
Funny to whom? Zero effect on me, and I could use a good laugh!
Okay then how about unrectified shit disturber?

Or rectum fired cluster fuck?
B***@37.com
2018-09-25 00:22:20 UTC
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What does Murders & Acquisitions Mean?
Tony Cooper
2018-09-25 01:04:35 UTC
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Post by B***@37.com
What does Murders & Acquisitions Mean?
Posts like the above should be ignored, but curiosity leads to Google.
It is the name of a game described as: Murders & Acquisitions is a
light, fun RPG of espionage, subterfuge, theft, intrigue, and murder
in an absurd corporate world. The world of M&A mimics our contemporary
world but with a healthy dose of humor and exaggeration layered over
it. Players portray characters who want to rise up the corporate
ladder by any means necessary. Thievery. Political intrigue.
Espionage. Sabotage. Killing your rivals. It's all fair game in an
over-the-top corporate world.

That, then, leads me to Google "RPG" in this context. It is,
evidently, "Role Playing Game".

I am not, though, better off for this knowledge.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-25 01:49:15 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by B***@37.com
What does Murders & Acquisitions Mean?
Posts like the above should be ignored, but curiosity leads to Google.
It is the name of a game described as: Murders & Acquisitions is a
light, fun RPG of espionage, subterfuge, theft, intrigue, and murder
in an absurd corporate world. The world of M&A mimics our contemporary
world but with a healthy dose of humor and exaggeration layered over
it. Players portray characters who want to rise up the corporate
ladder by any means necessary. Thievery. Political intrigue.
Espionage. Sabotage. Killing your rivals. It's all fair game in an
over-the-top corporate world.
That, then, leads me to Google "RPG" in this context. It is,
evidently, "Role Playing Game".
I am not, though, better off for this knowledge.
And neither Bozo nor Tony Cooper makes the association with the phrase
"mergers and acquisitions"?

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