Discussion:
Shit jobs
(too old to reply)
Peter Moylan
2021-05-02 09:07:39 UTC
Permalink
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.

"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."

Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2021-05-02 11:16:13 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 2 May 2021 20:07:39 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Google Translate may have trouble with Finnish as it is not a Romance
language but one of a small group known as Uralic.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uralic_languages
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-02 14:00:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 2 May 2021 20:07:39 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Google Translate may have trouble with Finnish as it is not a Romance
language but one of a small group known as Uralic.
Back when it was introduced, they told us that it worked mostly by
searching for phrases in bilingual texts. There are lots more English-
French, Spanish-English, maybe even Chinese-English parallel texts
than Finnish-English ones available to it on line.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uralic_languages
occam
2021-05-02 18:54:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 2 May 2021 20:07:39 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Google Translate may have trouble with Finnish as it is not a Romance
language but one of a small group known as Uralic.
Back when it was introduced, they told us that it worked mostly by
searching for phrases in bilingual texts. There are lots more English-
French, Spanish-English, maybe even Chinese-English parallel texts
than Finnish-English ones available to it on line.
Finland has been a member state of the EU since 1995. There should be no
shortage of official Finnish-English bilingual documents in the EU's
archives, sufficient for a stable corpus for automatic translation.
(Caveat: most official EU documents contain administrative gobbledegook,
so that may have a bearing on translation quality.)
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-02 20:29:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 2 May 2021 20:07:39 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Google Translate may have trouble with Finnish as it is not a Romance
language but one of a small group known as Uralic.
Back when it was introduced, they told us that it worked mostly by
searching for phrases in bilingual texts. There are lots more English-
French, Spanish-English, maybe even Chinese-English parallel texts
than Finnish-English ones available to it on line.
Finland has been a member state of the EU since 1995. There should be no
shortage of official Finnish-English bilingual documents in the EU's
archives, sufficient for a stable corpus for automatic translation.
(Caveat: most official EU documents contain administrative gobbledegook,
so that may have a bearing on translation quality.)
There are presumably just as many such for the other EU languages,
so _add_ to that number several centuries of literary translation (in a
broad sense) of the more widely spoken languages.
David Kleinecke
2021-05-03 00:37:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 2 May 2021 20:07:39 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Google Translate may have trouble with Finnish as it is not a Romance
language but one of a small group known as Uralic.
Back when it was introduced, they told us that it worked mostly by
searching for phrases in bilingual texts. There are lots more English-
French, Spanish-English, maybe even Chinese-English parallel texts
than Finnish-English ones available to it on line.
Finland has been a member state of the EU since 1995. There should be no
shortage of official Finnish-English bilingual documents in the EU's
archives, sufficient for a stable corpus for automatic translation.
(Caveat: most official EU documents contain administrative gobbledegook,
so that may have a bearing on translation quality.)
Project Gutenberg has been collecting Finnish Translations of all sorts of
things for the last few years.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-05-02 15:23:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 2 May 2021 20:07:39 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Google Translate may have trouble with Finnish as it is not a Romance
language but one of a small group known as Uralic.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uralic_languages
Yes, but Google Translate has done very well for at least seven or
eight years with languages that one might not expect, like Hausa. It
was doing a very creditable job with Hausa at a time when its French
and Spanish were hopeless (those have greatly improved, however). For
the spam message in Finnish that arrived this morning it produced a
fullhy intelligible translation.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Oğuz
2021-05-02 11:24:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Post by Peter Moylan
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
We don't have a word that means both movement and excrement in Turkish.
Post by Peter Moylan
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Peter Moylan
2021-05-02 11:41:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oğuz
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being
found in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive
jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going
through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Excretion is sometimes called "a bowel motion", especially by medical
people. That means that some people, especially those who don't want to
be too explicit, will call the product "a motion".
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Peter T. Daniels
2021-05-02 14:04:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Oğuz
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being
found in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive
jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going
through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Excretion is sometimes called "a bowel motion", especially by medical
people. That means that some people, especially those who don't want to
be too explicit, will call the product "a motion".
?! a bowel movement
a BM (baby-talk, maybe related: "a boom-boom")
number 2
from *How I Met Your Mother*, I learned "drop a deuce," clearly derived
from the latter

Who else says "bowel motion"?

I see how that improves the joke (which worked without knowing the
expression). We couldn't say "Just go through the movements."
Tony Cooper
2021-05-02 14:19:05 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 2 May 2021 22:41:55 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Oğuz
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being
found in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive
jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going
through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Excretion is sometimes called "a bowel motion", especially by medical
people. That means that some people, especially those who don't want to
be too explicit, will call the product "a motion".
I see the joke differently. "Going through the motions" means
appearing as if you are doing something. Anyone who can't swim is
going to drown if they just appear to be swimming but aren't actually
swimming.
--
Tony Cooper Orlando Florida
Quinn C
2021-05-02 14:41:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Oğuz
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being
found in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive
jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going
through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Excretion is sometimes called "a bowel motion", especially by medical
people. That means that some people, especially those who don't want to
be too explicit, will call the product "a motion".
Ah. I only know that as "bowel movement". And not for the product.
--
Where we are, when we are ... nothing but lies told by the senses.
-- Trance Gemini
Ken Blake
2021-05-02 17:16:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Oğuz
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being
found in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive
jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going
through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Excretion is sometimes called "a bowel motion", especially by medical
people. That means that some people, especially those who don't want to
be too explicit, will call the product "a motion".
I also didn't get the joke, since I've never heard of a "bowel motion."
In the US, the term often used is "bowel movement."
--
Ken
occam
2021-05-02 18:57:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Oğuz
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being
found in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive
jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going
through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Excretion is sometimes called "a bowel motion", especially by medical
people. That means that some people, especially those who don't want to
be too explicit, will call the product "a motion".
Oh, can I just say I have seen a lot of "motion" movies recently. The
more they make...
bil...@shaw.ca
2021-05-03 06:36:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Oğuz
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being
found in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive
jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
I didn't get the joke. Is it supposed to be funny because going
through the motions also means literally moving through faeces?
Excretion is sometimes called "a bowel motion", especially by medical
people. That means that some people, especially those who don't want to
be too explicit, will call the product "a motion".
In the English prevalent hereabouts, it is called "a bowel movement". I've never
heard "motion" in that context.

bill

bruce bowser
2021-05-02 17:02:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do,
Then first I would wonder: do all other languages, too?
Ross Clark
2021-05-02 21:10:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Motions Creek, in the suburbs of Auckland, has incurred its share of
jokes along those lines. Actually named for a Scottish settler, William
Motion, who had a mill in the area.

For the moving of the bowels, "motion" is actually quite a bit older
than "movement":

1602 W. Shakespeare Merry Wives of Windsor iii. i. 95 Shall I lose
my doctor? No, he giues me the motions And the potions.

1766 C. Anstey New Bath Guide ii. ii. 14 We must swallow a Potion
For driving out Wind after every Motion.

vs.

1891 New Sydenham Soc. Lexicon Movement,..the act of evacuating the
bowels; as well as the matter resulting therefrom.

"Movement" for the matter resulting therefrom was known to me as a
child. "Motion(s)" was new to me when I arrived in NZ -- perhaps now
used mainly by doctors and nurses.
Sam Plusnet
2021-05-03 01:25:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
Post by Peter Moylan
We've been getting news lately about how covid fragments are being found
in sewage. That triggered a discussion about unattractive jobs.
"George, dive into the pond and grab a turd for me, would you?"
"But I can't swim!"
"Well, just go through the motions."
Do other languages have that sense of "motions"? It seems that all the
Romance languages do, according to Google Translate; but my faith in
Google Translate was shaken by a translation from Finnish that I saw
earlier this evening.
Motions Creek, in the suburbs of Auckland, has incurred its share of
jokes along those lines. Actually named for a Scottish settler, William
Motion, who had a mill in the area.
For the moving of the bowels, "motion" is actually quite a bit older
That motion of the bowels is quite similar to a Mexican Wave.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
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