Discussion:
Ambiguity
(too old to reply)
David Kleinecke
2018-07-09 19:47:25 UTC
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The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
this morning:

Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
with Outstanding Warrants
Mark Brader
2018-07-09 19:53:37 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
with Outstanding Warrants
I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
"with" also works in that reading.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Normal caution suffices. In almost 70 years here,
***@vex.net | I have not been killed even once." --Peter Moylan

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Garrett Wollman
2018-07-09 21:11:01 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
with Outstanding Warrants
I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
"with" also works in that reading.
In old-style Headlinese, where space is at a premium, you might have
seen instead:

HED: Women Sought by Humboldt DA
DEK: Warrants outstanding for both on charges of [crime]

But that style of headline is "not SEO-friendly" as they say, so
nowadays headlines are less compressed.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Quinn C
2018-07-09 22:57:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
with Outstanding Warrants
I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
"with" also works in that reading.
The two readings I see are that
- they are looking for two specific women
- any two women with outstanding warrants will do

It being the DA in practice disambiguates for the former. If it was an
investigative journalist's request, both make sense.
--
Ice hockey is a form of disorderly conduct
in which the score is kept.
-- Doug Larson
David Kleinecke
2018-07-09 23:06:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by Mark Brader
Post by David Kleinecke
The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
with Outstanding Warrants
I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
"with" also works in that reading.
The two readings I see are that
- they are looking for two specific women
- any two women with outstanding warrants will do
It being the DA in practice disambiguates for the former. If it was an
investigative journalist's request, both make sense.
Perhaps a man must have a dirty mind to imagine "warrant"
is a euphemism.

PS: A hit-amd-run and a thief.
Mark Brader
2018-07-10 06:20:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
The two readings I see are that
- they are looking for two specific women
- any two women with outstanding warrants will do
Ah, good point.
--
Mark Brader "God help us if [the Nazis]'d won;
Toronto I cannot imagine their sitcoms."
***@vex.net --James Lileks
Paul Wolff
2018-07-10 13:18:08 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
with Outstanding Warrants
A Financial Times article headline yesterday:
"Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"

"Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
article and read the awful truth.
--
Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-10 14:18:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
"Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"
"Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
article and read the awful truth.
Passives Often Found In Headlines
Paul Wolff
2018-07-10 20:32:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
"Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"
"Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
article and read the awful truth.
Passives Often Found In Headlines
But they aren't the first choice of a reader.
--
Paul
Quinn C
2018-07-10 22:22:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
"Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"
"Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
article and read the awful truth.
Passives Often Found In Headlines
But they aren't the first choice of a reader.
I hate to be co-opted like that.
--
We say, 'If any lady or gentleman shall buy this article _____ shall
have it for five dollars.' The blank may be filled with he, she, it,
or they; or in any other manner; and yet the form of the expression
will be too vulgar to be uttered. -- Wkly Jrnl of Commerce (1839)
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