Discussion:
snail mail?
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Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-13 21:18:01 UTC
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A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
beginning some contemporary examples:

"Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."

*Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
given.
**The letter is addressed to Norwich..
***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.

Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-13 21:33:45 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
"Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
*Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
given.
**The letter is addressed to Norwich..
***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..

<Loading Image...>

or foliage ...

<Loading Image...>
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-13 21:50:43 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
"Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
*Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
given.
**The letter is addressed to Norwich..
***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
Adam Funk
2018-09-14 07:57:05 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.

"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"

<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
--
I don't quite understand this worship of objectivity in
journalism. Now, just flat-out lying is different from being
subjective. --- Hunter S Thompson
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 12:12:07 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
two months after the item in question

"The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
collections planning manager."

What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
responsible for???
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-14 12:27:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
two months after the item in question
"The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
collections planning manager."
What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
responsible for???
But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 14:38:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:27:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
two months after the item in question
"The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
collections planning manager."
What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
responsible for???
But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!
There's something wrong there. If envelopes were left overnight in
the addressee's mailbox, and snail damage occurred, the postie
wouldn't notice the damage or bag the envelope. It's not logical to
think that he would go through the mail left earlier and check for
damage. He, or she, is certainly not going to carry a rubber stamp
along on his route.

For the envelope to be noticed and bagged, it would have to be prior
to delivery. The snail damage would be either at the sender's end or
in a Royal Mail post box.

The Royal Mail was charging the wrong party, but that's government for
you.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Janet
2018-09-14 15:23:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@invalid.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
For the envelope to be noticed and bagged, it would have to be prior
to delivery. The snail damage would be either at the sender's end or
in a Royal Mail post box.
The Royal Mail was charging the wrong party, but that's government for
you.
The govt doesn't own Royal Mail.

If a letter has no stamp then the royal mail will invite the
recipient to pay for its transport and delivery.

There's a surcharge for that service. If the recipient declines to pay
up, they won't get the letter.

Janet.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 18:14:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:27:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
two months after the item in question
"The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
collections planning manager."
What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
responsible for???
But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!
There's something wrong there. If envelopes were left overnight in
the addressee's mailbox, and snail damage occurred, the postie
wouldn't notice the damage or bag the envelope. It's not logical to
think that he would go through the mail left earlier and check for
damage. He, or she, is certainly not going to carry a rubber stamp
along on his route.
I _hope_ that was intended as a "joke." There is no hint, anywhere, either
in the original story or in Maddie's comment, that the snails were in any
individual's mailbox (which, you might recall, though I suppose you don't,
they don't call a "mailbox" but something involving the slot that the
letters are pushed through to fall either onto the floor or into a
container intended for the purpose). They were in the postboxes in which
letters are deposited for the Royal Mail to pick up on a set schedule,
and Maddie's advice was to only mail letters shortly before the scheduled
pickup time.
Post by Tony Cooper
For the envelope to be noticed and bagged, it would have to be prior
to delivery. The snail damage would be either at the sender's end or
in a Royal Mail post box.
The Royal Mail was charging the wrong party, but that's government for
you.
Tak To
2018-09-14 16:31:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
two months after the item in question
"The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
collections planning manager."
What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
responsible for???
But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!
They can install collars around the inlet[1]. They can clean
the exterior to get rid of the slime trail so that other
snails would not follow. Etc.

[1] E.g.,
Loading Image...
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 14:25:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
So far, no snails have appeared in our mailbox. It's fairly common,
though, for an anole (those small lizard-like creatures that abound in
Florida) to be found in our mailbox. They don't chew on mail, but it
can be quite unsettling to pull out the mail and have one of them jump
out.

Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though. Plucking vs
salting is a common discussion point.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2018-09-14 16:42:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
So far, no snails have appeared in our mailbox. It's fairly common,
though, for an anole (those small lizard-like creatures that abound in
Florida)
They are lizards.
Post by Tony Cooper
to be found in our mailbox. They don't chew on mail, but it
can be quite unsettling to pull out the mail and have one of them jump
out.
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though. Plucking vs
salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-18 08:04:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
So far, no snails have appeared in our mailbox. It's fairly common,
though, for an anole (those small lizard-like creatures that abound in
Florida)
They are lizards.
Post by Tony Cooper
to be found in our mailbox. They don't chew on mail, but it
can be quite unsettling to pull out the mail and have one of them jump
out.
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though. Plucking vs
salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.

Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the mists
of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just thought it
was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague who works on
diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that have been
ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious but
apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
--
athel
Peter Moylan
2018-10-18 11:32:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.

I've heard about the beer approach, but I've never been much of a beer
drinker, so I rarely have beer on hand. I have no idea how snails would
react to wine or whisky, which are my preferred poisons.

Snails are definitely a problem at my present home. In past years I used
to produce good supplies of lettuce, but I've never managed to grow
lettuce since moving here. The snails invariably consume all of the
seedlings. In compensation, I do manage to get a few tomatoes. At a
previous address, the fruit flies got them all.

As a child I used to go out after a rainstorm, and collect a hundred or
so snails from the front garden to feed to the chooks. Here I don't find
snails after rain; not that we get much rain anyway. I think the snails
sneak out at night, and I don't have the patience to take a torch out in
the middle of the night.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
s***@gmail.com
2018-10-19 01:51:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.
Possibly, but also at pool supply stores ... is, or was, a very common
filter filler.

There's a lot of it quarried on the mid-south California Coast
(environs of Santa Barbara and Ventura).
Or at least, that was a common source in the '60s.
I'm not sure about white cliff supplies.
Post by Peter Moylan
I've heard about the beer approach, but I've never been much of a beer
drinker, so I rarely have beer on hand. I have no idea how snails would
react to wine or whisky, which are my preferred poisons.
Snails are definitely a problem at my present home. In past years I used
to produce good supplies of lettuce, but I've never managed to grow
lettuce since moving here. The snails invariably consume all of the
seedlings. In compensation, I do manage to get a few tomatoes. At a
previous address, the fruit flies got them all.
As a child I used to go out after a rainstorm, and collect a hundred or
so snails from the front garden to feed to the chooks. Here I don't find
snails after rain; not that we get much rain anyway. I think the snails
sneak out at night, and I don't have the patience to take a torch out in
the middle of the night.
Domesticated gees will do the hunting without a torch, won't they?

/dps "maybe ducks, too, but you don't hear of farmers putting ducks in their fields"
David Kleinecke
2018-10-19 02:53:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.
Possibly, but also at pool supply stores ... is, or was, a very common
filter filler.
There's a lot of it quarried on the mid-south California Coast
(environs of Santa Barbara and Ventura).
Or at least, that was a common source in the '60s.
I'm not sure about white cliff supplies.
I think you mean the mines (more like quarries) near
Lompoc. Closed many years and and probably forgotten
except by a few old-timers. I think the earth is
far from all removed and the mines closed for health
reasons.
J. J. Lodder
2018-10-19 08:57:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.
Possibly, but also at pool supply stores ... is, or was, a very common
filter filler.
There's a lot of it quarried on the mid-south California Coast
(environs of Santa Barbara and Ventura).
Or at least, that was a common source in the '60s.
I'm not sure about white cliff supplies.
I think you mean the mines (more like quarries) near
Lompoc. Closed many years and and probably forgotten
except by a few old-timers. I think the earth is
far from all removed and the mines closed for health
reasons.
It can't have been for lack of demand for dynamite,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2018-10-19 03:56:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Moylan
As a child I used to go out after a rainstorm, and collect a
hundred or so snails from the front garden to feed to the chooks.
Here I don't find snails after rain; not that we get much rain
anyway. I think the snails sneak out at night, and I don't have the
patience to take a torch out in the middle of the night.
Domesticated gees will do the hunting without a torch, won't they?
An interesting idea, but I think it would traumatise our cats. They
already get upset enough when a bird sits on the fence.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-19 11:04:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.
Possibly, but also at pool supply stores ... is, or was, a very common
filter filler.
There's a lot of it quarried on the mid-south California Coast
(environs of Santa Barbara and Ventura).
Or at least, that was a common source in the '60s.
I'm not sure about white cliff supplies.
Post by Peter Moylan
I've heard about the beer approach, but I've never been much of a beer
drinker, so I rarely have beer on hand. I have no idea how snails would
react to wine or whisky, which are my preferred poisons.
Snails are definitely a problem at my present home. In past years I used
to produce good supplies of lettuce, but I've never managed to grow
lettuce since moving here. The snails invariably consume all of the
seedlings. In compensation, I do manage to get a few tomatoes. At a
previous address, the fruit flies got them all.
As a child I used to go out after a rainstorm, and collect a hundred or
so snails from the front garden to feed to the chooks. Here I don't find
snails after rain; not that we get much rain anyway. I think the snails
sneak out at night, and I don't have the patience to take a torch out in
the middle of the night.
Domesticated gees will do the hunting without a torch, won't they?
/dps "maybe ducks, too, but you don't hear of farmers putting ducks in their fields"
You might not hear of it but it's certainly done. Vineyards have been
adopting a South African farmer's wizard wheeze of letting Indian
runner ducks charge about his estate since 2016 with great success.
They'd be a better choice for domestic gardens than geese certainly.
There's really not that much difference between a lettuce seedling
consumed by slugs and snails and one stood on by a goose. The
lighter and narrower of foot duck might give it a fighting chance.
Joy Beeson
2018-10-20 02:03:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 18 Oct 2018 22:32:39 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
As a child I used to go out after a rainstorm, and collect a hundred or
so snails from the front garden to feed to the chooks. Here I don't find
snails after rain; not that we get much rain anyway. I think the snails
sneak out at night, and I don't have the patience to take a torch out in
the middle of the night.
I used to lay a board in the garden in the evening, and in the morning
I would put it in the chicken pen with the other side up.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-20 02:39:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.
I've heard about the beer approach, but I've never been much of a beer
drinker, so I rarely have beer on hand. I have no idea how snails would
react to wine or whisky, which are my preferred poisons.
...

Beer is cheap, especially, I guess, if you're buying it for reasons
other than human consumption. I don't know how it compares with the
other methods in snails for the buck.
--
Jerry Friedman
Lewis
2018-10-20 09:15:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.
I've heard about the beer approach, but I've never been much of a beer
drinker, so I rarely have beer on hand. I have no idea how snails would
react to wine or whisky, which are my preferred poisons.
...
Beer is cheap, especially, I guess, if you're buying it for reasons
other than human consumption. I don't know how it compares with the
other methods in snails for the buck.
Diatomaceous earth probably kills slugs because of its properties as a
desiccant, and not so much because of its sharp point bits. It is
effective on (most?) insects as well and we've used it to control the
occasional ant invasion.

We don't get much in the way of slug or snail infestations here, but
when we did as a kid, beer was the go to solution since salt would
damage the plants, though it was far more effective.

At least one teacher used the fact that beer killed slugs and snails as
"proof" people shouldn't drink it.
--
@notallmikaylas Any man who is genuinely scared that feminism means female
dominance pictures a world where men are treated like women. Think about that.
RHDraney
2018-10-20 09:35:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
At least one teacher used the fact that beer killed slugs and snails as
"proof" people shouldn't drink it.
Insert old joke about the temperance lecturer demonstrating that a worm
dropped into a tumbler of gin dies almost instantly and asking "Now what
does that tell us?"...

And from the back comes a slurred voice: "if you have worms, drink gin!"...r
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-20 14:26:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Tony Cooper
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though.
Plucking vs salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the
mists of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just
thought it was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague
who works on diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that
have been ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious
but apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
Lately I've been sprinkling crushed eggshells on my vegetable garden,
but that's too coarse a solution. I'll have to look up diatomaceous
earth. No doubt our garden supply people sell it.
I've heard about the beer approach, but I've never been much of a beer
drinker, so I rarely have beer on hand. I have no idea how snails would
react to wine or whisky, which are my preferred poisons.
...
Beer is cheap, especially, I guess, if you're buying it for reasons
other than human consumption. I don't know how it compares with the
other methods in snails for the buck.
Diatomaceous earth probably kills slugs because of its properties as a
desiccant, and not so much because of its sharp point bits. It is
effective on (most?) insects as well and we've used it to control the
occasional ant invasion.
Most crawling insects, that is.
Post by Lewis
We don't get much in the way of slug or snail infestations here, but
when we did as a kid, beer was the go to solution since salt would
damage the plants, though it was far more effective.
At least one teacher used the fact that beer killed slugs and snails as
"proof" people shouldn't drink it.
The teacher should have known that beer isn't rated in proof.

I've been known to remark to my students, if the subject of slugs (as a
unit of mass) comes up, that slugs are so attracted to beer that they'll
drown in it, and there are people like that. My students seem to know
what I'm talking about.
--
Jerry Friedman
Adam Funk
2018-10-18 14:42:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.
"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
So far, no snails have appeared in our mailbox. It's fairly common,
though, for an anole (those small lizard-like creatures that abound in
Florida)
They are lizards.
Post by Tony Cooper
to be found in our mailbox. They don't chew on mail, but it
can be quite unsettling to pull out the mail and have one of them jump
out.
Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though. Plucking vs
salting is a common discussion point.
Beer!
Yes! When I had a garden I used to kill slugs with beer.
Apparently it produces impressive-looking (gross, but impressive)
results, but doesn't really make a dent in the number of slugs per m^3
of dirt (someone has measured that).
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Diatomaceous earth is also supposed to be effective. Back in the mists
of time I had no idea what diatomaceous earth was and just thought it
was a strange term. However, now that I have a colleague who works on
diatoms I have learned that it consists of diatoms that have been
ground up into a powder. On a human scale it isn't obvious but
apparently it contains lots of sharp edges that cut up a slug's
digestive tract.
ISTR it's quite dangerous (for humans) to breathe that stuff, although
it's safe enough when wet. (It is, or used to be, used in aquarium
filtration.)
--
You're a brave man. Go and break through the lines. And remember,
while you're out there risking your life and limb through shot and
shell, we'll be in be in here thinking what a sucker you are.
--- President Rufus T Firefly
occam
2018-09-14 14:35:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
"Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
*Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
given.
**The letter is addressed to Norwich..
***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..
<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
or foliage ...
<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
for British Rail.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 15:13:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
for British Rail.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.

I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
reporting on a British Rail stoppage."

That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-09-14 15:58:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:13:39 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by occam
I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
for British Rail.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.
I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
reporting on a British Rail stoppage."
That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.
In a broadcast you might not recognise his name when spoken.
He is Scottish. The "augh" in "Naughtie" rhymes with the "och" in
"Loch".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Janet
2018-09-14 16:32:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@invalid.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by occam
I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
for British Rail.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.
which is not pronounced naughty, so it isn't funny either.

Janet.
Post by Tony Cooper
I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
reporting on a British Rail stoppage."
That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 16:58:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:13:39 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by occam
I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
for British Rail.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.
I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
reporting on a British Rail stoppage."
I don't know what's going on with me. I leave out words and don't
notice. "This *is*..."
Post by Tony Cooper
That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Paul Carmichael
2018-09-14 16:43:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
We have them here in southern Spain.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-18 08:05:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
We have them here in southern Spain.
And in Provence.
--
athel
b***@aol.com
2018-09-13 21:45:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
"Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
*Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
given.
**The letter is addressed to Norwich..
***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
The bottomline is the issue must have been addressed sluggishly.
Richard Tobin
2018-09-13 22:20:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
added, like this:

Loading Image...

The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:

https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835

-- Richard
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 02:43:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018

The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Adam Funk
2018-09-14 07:58:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
--
Java is kind of like kindergarten. There are lots of rules you have to
remember. If you don't follow them, the compiler makes you sit in the
corner until you do. --- Don Raab
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 12:07:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-09-14 14:17:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
It let me behind the paywall.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 18:10:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
It let me behind the paywall.
Only members, then, need to sign in to access it -- so long as anyone else
knows the url. (Which doesn't incorporate the APS's url, stamps.org)
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 14:29:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
No problem opening it and going through pages here. No paywall at
all.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Adam Funk
2018-09-14 15:57:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
No problem opening it and going through pages here. No paywall at
all.
Same here.
--
I have a natural revulsion to any operating system that shows so
little planning as to have to named all of its commands after
digestive noises (awk, grep, fsck, nroff).
_The UNIX-HATERS Handbook_
soup
2018-09-14 19:03:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
No problem opening it and going through pages here. No paywall at
all.
+1
Tak To
2018-09-14 16:38:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[...]
I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Far out!
+1
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
Yes.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
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