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Lazypierrot
2021-01-23 05:09:03 UTC
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I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in the following passage, which is taken from a text about the history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than something " should follow "more similar to a Worcestershire sauce" I wonder what is compared in the sentence.


Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.


Cordially,

LP
Jerry Friedman
2021-01-23 05:19:45 UTC
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I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in the following passage, which is taken from a text about the history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than something " should follow "more similar to a Worcestershire sauce" I wonder what is compared in the sentence.
Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be "As the Chinese
version is somewhat like a Worcestershire sauce" or "As the Chinese
version is more like a Worcestershire sauce than anything else the British
knew" or something like that.
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-01-23 09:26:46 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the Chinese
version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in the following
passage, which is taken from a text about the history of ketchup. I
think a phrase "than something " should follow "more similar to a
Worcestershire sauce" I wonder what is compared in the sentence.>>>
Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights of
this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks tried to
reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese version
is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients
such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create
those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning consisting of
mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be "As the Chinese
version is somewhat like a Worcestershire sauce" or "As the Chinese
version is more like a Worcestershire sauce than anything else the British
knew" or something like that.
In England we mostly call it Worcester sauce, much easier to say than
the Worcestershire sauce that Americans struggle with. Worcester is
indeed in Worcestershire, but the sauce is made in Worcester, so there
is no real need to mention the county (even though Lee and Perrins do
so on their label).

Fun fact: The Dyson Perrins laboratory (where Paul and I spent many
happy hours doing boring practicals in smelly surroundings, with the
prospect of gazing on the future Lady Archer as the only consolation)
was named in honour of the same Perrins.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
Peter Moylan
2021-01-23 10:42:05 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Fun fact: The Dyson Perrins laboratory (where Paul and I spent many
happy hours doing boring practicals in smelly surroundings, with the
prospect of gazing on the future Lady Archer as the only
consolation) was named in honour of the same Perrins.
Boring fact: I grew up living in Perrin Street. For most of that time I
knew nothing about Brownian motion.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW
Lewis
2021-01-23 11:20:00 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In England we mostly call it Worcester sauce, much easier to say than
the Worcestershire sauce that Americans struggle with. Worcester is
indeed in Worcestershire, but the sauce is made in Worcester, so there
is no real need to mention the county (even though Lee and Perrins do
so on their label).
Wuster is not hard to say, and I do not try to add the '-shire' at the
end (didn't even notice it was there until I started doing my own
grocery shopping as an adult). Occasionally someone tries to insist that
it's woorsheshtershushire or something like that, but I ignore them.
--
"Are you pondering what I'm pondering?"
"Wuh, I think so, Brain, but will they let the Cranberry Duchess stay
in the Lincoln Bedroom?"
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-01-23 12:10:50 UTC
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Permalink
On Sat, 23 Jan 2021 09:26:46 GMT, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the Chinese
version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in the
following passage, which is taken from a text about the history of
ketchup. I think a phrase "than something " should follow "more
similar to a Worcestershire sauce" I wonder what is compared in the
sentence.>>> Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered
the delights of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West,
where cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce.
As the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce,
the British used ingredients such as anchovies or oysters,
mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup
came to mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be "As the
Chinese version is somewhat like a Worcestershire sauce" or "As the
Chinese version is more like a Worcestershire sauce than anything
else the British knew" or something like that.
In England we mostly call it Worcester sauce, much easier to say than
the Worcestershire sauce that Americans struggle with. Worcester is
indeed in Worcestershire, but the sauce is made in Worcester, so there
is no real need to mention the county (even though Lee and Perrins do
so on their label).
Fun fact: The Dyson Perrins laboratory (where Paul and I spent many
happy hours doing boring practicals in smelly surroundings, with the
prospect of gazing on the future Lady Archer as the only consolation)
was named in honour of the same Perrins.
Not Reggie? aw.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2021-01-23 13:13:17 UTC
Reply
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sat, 23 Jan 2021 09:26:46 GMT, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the Chinese
version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in the
following passage, which is taken from a text about the history of
ketchup. I think a phrase "than something " should follow "more
similar to a Worcestershire sauce" I wonder what is compared in the
sentence.>>> Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered
the delights of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West,
where cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce.
As the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce,
the British used ingredients such as anchovies or oysters,
mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup
came to mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be "As the
Chinese version is somewhat like a Worcestershire sauce" or "As the
Chinese version is more like a Worcestershire sauce than anything
else the British knew" or something like that.
In England we mostly call it Worcester sauce, much easier to say than
the Worcestershire sauce that Americans struggle with. Worcester is
indeed in Worcestershire, but the sauce is made in Worcester, so there
is no real need to mention the county (even though Lee and Perrins do
so on their label).
Fun fact: The Dyson Perrins laboratory (where Paul and I spent many
happy hours doing boring practicals in smelly surroundings, with the
prospect of gazing on the future Lady Archer as the only consolation)
was named in honour of the same Perrins.
Not Reggie? aw.
He was singular.
--
Athel -- British, living in France for 34 years
musika
2021-01-23 14:25:40 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sat, 23 Jan 2021 09:26:46 GMT, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Fun fact: The Dyson Perrins laboratory (where Paul and I spent many
happy hours doing boring practicals in smelly surroundings, with the
prospect of gazing on the future Lady Archer as the only consolation)
was named in honour of the same Perrins.
Not Reggie? aw.
He was singular.
As was Mr. Ball
--
Ray
UK
CDB
2021-01-23 14:12:34 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the
Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in
the following passage, which is taken from a text about the
history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than something " should
follow "more similar to a Worcestershire sauce" I wonder what is
compared in the sentence.>>> Here, seventeenth-century English
sailors discovered the delights of this Chinese seasoning and
brought it to the West, where cooks tried to reproduce their own
versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese version is more
similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients
such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to
re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a
seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be "As
the Chinese version is somewhat like a Worcestershire sauce" or "As
the Chinese version is more like a Worcestershire sauce than
anything else the British knew" or something like that.
Or "... more like Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as
ketchup"?

I applaud LP for providing context, but I suspect a clue might be found
in even broader context.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
In England we mostly call it Worcester sauce, much easier to say than
the Worcestershire sauce that Americans struggle with. Worcester is
indeed in Worcestershire, but the sauce is made in Worcester, so
there is no real need to mention the county (even though Lee and
Perrins do so on their label).
I have a francophone friend who calls it "Worechestershire
[***@rshaIr] sauce". His English is very good, but his education
was all in French.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Fun fact: The Dyson Perrins laboratory (where Paul and I spent many
happy hours doing boring practicals in smelly surroundings, with the
prospect of gazing on the future Lady Archer as the only
consolation) was named in honour of the same Perrins.
Lazypierrot
2021-01-30 08:02:53 UTC
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I found in WIKIPEDIA the following description:
Worcestershire sauce is a fermented liquid condiment created in the city of Worcester in Worcestershire, England during the first half of the 19th century.

I wonder if the "a Worcestershire sauce" in the following passage is completely different from the one we now know and are using. Is it that the indefinite article "a" implies that one of the sauces used in Worcestershire in seventeenth-century, not the one familiar to us today?


Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.

Cordially,


LP
CDB
2021-01-30 13:45:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I found in WIKIPEDIA the following description: Worcestershire sauce
is a fermented liquid condiment created in the city of Worcester in
Worcestershire, England during the first half of the 19th century.
I wonder if the "a Worcestershire sauce" in the following passage is
completely different from the one we now know and are using. Is it
that the indefinite article "a" implies that one of the sauces used
in Worcestershire in seventeenth-century, not the one familiar to us
today?
Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights of
this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks tried
to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese
version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used
ingredients such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and walnuts to
re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning
consisting of mushrooms.
There are other "Worcestershire" sauces than Lea and Perrins's. See the
list of varieties and ingredients in this article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcestershire_sauce
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-01-30 14:47:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
I found in WIKIPEDIA the following description: Worcestershire sauce
is a fermented liquid condiment created in the city of Worcester in
Worcestershire, England during the first half of the 19th century.
I wonder if the "a Worcestershire sauce" in the following passage is
completely different from the one we now know and are using. Is it
that the indefinite article "a" implies that one of the sauces used
in Worcestershire in seventeenth-century, not the one familiar to us
today?
Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights of
this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks tried
to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese
version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used
ingredients such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and walnuts to
re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning
consisting of mushrooms.
There are other "Worcestershire" sauces than Lea and Perrins's. See the
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcestershire_sauce
I sometimes have "Worcester Sauce" flavour (flavor) crisps (chips); there
can be no anchovies in the flavo[u]ring, as the packet has "Suitable for
Vegans" on it.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
CDB
2021-02-01 13:51:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by CDB
I found in WIKIPEDIA the following description: Worcestershire
sauce is a fermented liquid condiment created in the city of
Worcester in Worcestershire, England during the first half of the
19th century.
I wonder if the "a Worcestershire sauce" in the following passage
is completely different from the one we now know and are using.
Is it that the indefinite article "a" implies that one of the
sauces used in Worcestershire in seventeenth-century, not the one
familiar to us today?
Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights
of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks
tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the
Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the
British used ingredients such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms,
and walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to
mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
There are other "Worcestershire" sauces than Lea and Perrins's.
See
the
Post by CDB
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcestershire_sauce
I sometimes have "Worcester Sauce" flavour (flavor) crisps (chips);
there can be no anchovies in the flavo[u]ring, as the packet has
"Suitable for Vegans" on it.
Chips (saving your presence), I remember those. I preferred the plain
ones, of the thickness usually called "kettle-cooked". Lay's-type chips
remind me of fried airmail-paper.
--
I wonder what a New Zealander would get in Mexico if he asked for chups.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chupa_Chups
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-02-01 14:14:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by CDB
I found in WIKIPEDIA the following description: Worcestershire
sauce is a fermented liquid condiment created in the city of
Worcester in Worcestershire, England during the first half of the
19th century.
I wonder if the "a Worcestershire sauce" in the following passage
is completely different from the one we now know and are using.
Is it that the indefinite article "a" implies that one of the
sauces used in Worcestershire in seventeenth-century, not the one
familiar to us today?
Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights
of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks
tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark sauce. As the
Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the
British used ingredients such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms,
and walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to
mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
There are other "Worcestershire" sauces than Lea and Perrins's.
See
the
Post by CDB
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worcestershire_sauce
I sometimes have "Worcester Sauce" flavour (flavor) crisps (chips);
there can be no anchovies in the flavo[u]ring, as the packet has
"Suitable for Vegans" on it.
Chips (saving your presence), I remember those. I preferred the plain
ones, of the thickness usually called "kettle-cooked". Lay's-type chips
remind me of fried airmail-paper.
Not available in France? Do you have "Flips" (peanut flavoured puffed um
snacks)? We don't (in general, sometimes as a special in Lidl).
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
CDB
2021-02-01 14:45:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[wooster-flavoured treats]
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by CDB
Chips (saving your presence), I remember those. I preferred the
plain ones, of the thickness usually called "kettle-cooked".
Lay's-type
chips
Post by CDB
remind me of fried airmail-paper.
Not available in France?
Not last time I was there (1947).

Do you have "Flips" (peanut flavoured puffed um
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
snacks)? We don't (in general, sometimes as a special in Lidl).
I am happy to report that I have never seen them.
--
I might have been tempted.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-02-01 15:25:36 UTC
Reply
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Post by CDB
[wooster-flavoured treats]
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by CDB
Chips (saving your presence), I remember those. I preferred the
plain ones, of the thickness usually called "kettle-cooked".
Lay's-type
chips
Post by CDB
remind me of fried airmail-paper.
Not available in France?
Not last time I was there (1947).
Sorry! I thought you were Athel, my apologies to you both.
Post by CDB
Do you have "Flips" (peanut flavoured puffed um
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
snacks)? We don't (in general, sometimes as a special in Lidl).
I am happy to report that I have never seen them.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Lazypierrot
2021-02-01 13:51:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the
Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in
the following passage, which is taken from a text about the
history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than something " should
follow "more similar to a Worcestershire sauce" I wonder what is
compared in the sentence.>>> Here, seventeenth-century English
sailors discovered the delights of this Chinese seasoning and
brought it to the West, where cooks tried to reproduce their own
versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese version is more
similar to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients
such as anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to
re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a
seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be "As
the Chinese version is somewhat like a Worcestershire sauce" or "As
the Chinese version is more like a Worcestershire sauce than
anything else the British knew" or something like that.
Or "... more like Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as
ketchup"?
...
Now that you mention it, that does seem more likely than my
suggestions.
--
Jerry Friedman
I am interested in the interpretation:
Or "... more like Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as ketchup"?

Would you explain it in more detail? I cannot figure out why you think so.

Cordially,

LP
CDB
2021-02-01 14:54:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As
the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire
sauce, " in the following passage, which is taken from a
text about the history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than
something " should follow "more similar to a Worcestershire
sauce" I wonder what is compared in the sentence.>>> Here,
seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights
of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where
cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark
sauce. As the Chinese version is more similar to a
Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients such as
anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create
those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning
consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be
"As the Chinese version is somewhat like a Worcestershire
sauce" or "As the Chinese version is more like a
Worcestershire sauce than anything else the British knew" or
something like that.
Or "... more like Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as ketchup"?
...
Now that you mention it, that does seem more likely than my
suggestions.
I am interested in the interpretation: Or "... more like
Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as ketchup"?
Would you explain it in more detail? I cannot figure out why you think so.
Although the word "ketchup" is still sometimes used, especually in Great
Britain, for something like the original in phrases like "mushroom
ketchup", the word "ketchup" by itself almost always means a thick sauce
made of tomato paste, vinegar, sugar, and spices. That is "what we know
today as ketchup".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketchup
charles
2021-02-01 14:59:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Lazypierrot
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As
the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire
sauce, " in the following passage, which is taken from a
text about the history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than
something " should follow "more similar to a Worcestershire
sauce" I wonder what is compared in the sentence.>>> Here,
seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights
of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where
cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark
sauce. As the Chinese version is more similar to a
Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients such as
anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create
those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning
consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be
"As the Chinese version is somewhat like a Worcestershire
sauce" or "As the Chinese version is more like a
Worcestershire sauce than anything else the British knew" or
something like that.
Or "... more like Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as ketchup"?
...
Now that you mention it, that does seem more likely than my
suggestions.
I am interested in the interpretation: Or "... more like
Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as ketchup"?
Would you explain it in more detail? I cannot figure out why you think so.
Although the word "ketchup" is still sometimes used, especually in Great
Britain, for something like the original in phrases like "mushroom
ketchup", the word "ketchup" by itself almost always means a thick sauce
made of tomato paste, vinegar, sugar, and spices. That is "what we know
today as ketchup".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketchup
A great many years ago, one of the 'Antiques' shows on BBC tv produced a
bottle of 100 year old claret. With great ceremony the botted was opened
an the poured into glasses for each of the panel. Th camera cut to one of
of them - we has making faces. "Tour views, Clement" asked the host. "I
don't like drinking mushroom ketchup."
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Ken Blake
2021-02-01 16:18:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by CDB
Post by CDB
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As
the Chinese version is more similar to a Worcestershire
sauce, " in the following passage, which is taken from a
text about the history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than
something " should follow "more similar to a Worcestershire
sauce" I wonder what is compared in the sentence.>>> Here,
seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights
of this Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where
cooks tried to reproduce their own versions of the dark
sauce. As the Chinese version is more similar to a
Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients such as
anchovies or oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create
those flavors. In turn, ketchup came to mean a seasoning
consisting of mushrooms.
It's not great writing, in my opinion. It should probably be
"As the Chinese version is somewhat like a Worcestershire
sauce" or "As the Chinese version is more like a
Worcestershire sauce than anything else the British knew" or
something like that.
Or "... more like Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know
today as ketchup"?
...
Now that you mention it, that does seem more likely than my
suggestions.
I am interested in the interpretation: Or "... more like
Worcestershire sauce than [like] what we know today as ketchup"?
Would you explain it in more detail? I cannot figure out why you think so.
Although the word "ketchup" is still sometimes used, especually in Great
Britain, for something like the original in phrases like "mushroom
ketchup", the word "ketchup" by itself almost always means a thick sauce
made of tomato paste, vinegar, sugar, and spices. That is "what we know
today as ketchup".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketchup
A great many years ago, one of the 'Antiques' shows on BBC tv produced a
bottle of 100 year old claret. With great ceremony the botted was opened
an the poured into glasses for each of the panel. Th camera cut to one of
of them - we has making faces. "Tour views, Clement" asked the host. "I
don't like drinking mushroom ketchup."
There's an occasional exception for a very great Château in an
outstanding vintage, but the great majority of clarets anywhere near
that old are going to be terrible.
--
Ken
Horace LaBadie
2021-01-23 14:02:20 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Lazypierrot
I would like to know what is meant by the sentence, "As the Chinese version
is more similar to a Worcestershire sauce, " in the following passage, which
is taken from a text about the history of ketchup. I think a phrase "than
something " should follow "more similar to a Worcestershire sauce" I wonder
what is compared in the sentence.
Here, seventeenth-century English sailors discovered the delights of this
Chinese seasoning and brought it to the West, where cooks tried to reproduce
their own versions of the dark sauce. As the Chinese version is more similar
to a Worcestershire sauce, the British used ingredients such as anchovies or
oysters, mushrooms, and *walnuts to re-create those flavors. In turn, ketchup
came to mean a seasoning consisting of mushrooms.
Cordially,
LP
The comparison is between "this Chinese seasoning" and some other
version of ketchup.
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