Discussion:
Annoying printers
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Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-05 23:13:09 UTC
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[snip]
If they can't speak English that's their problem.
I think that knowing English should be a requirement for things like
registering a vehicle (in an English-speaking country). Some people don't.
I'm in the "some people don't" category, although I'm not militant or
hardcore about it. I've spent quite a bit of my adult life in other
countries and was always rather amazed at how I and my fellow travelers
just assumed that everyone we encountered would know English - because
mostly they did, to varying degrees. So in this country, (USA), I'm
willing to do my best to talk to anyone. Today, for example, there's a
crew at the house putting on a new roof. Out of the 7 people, only one
apparently speaks English. For the others, I use my High School Spanish
plus what little I picked up during my frequent visits to Spain back in
the 1980's.
When my grandparents came to this country, none of them spoke English.
They each learned, but I imagine that that took a while. To be fair, the
person who became my paternal grandmother didn't know any languages at
all when she arrived, since she was born aboard ship during the trip.
I think people should learn the language of the country they're in only
to make their own lives easier, not to make my life easier. My life is
already easy enough.
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if it's male or female? Preposterous!
Peter Moylan
2018-10-06 04:13:42 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.

It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peeler
2018-10-06 08:26:42 UTC
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Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 14:13:42 +1000, Peter Moron, another brain damaged,
Post by Peter Moylan
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
And senile idiot no.1 appeared to swallow the abnormal sociopathic attention
whore's latest idiotic troll bait, hook, line and sinker again! <tsk>
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 11:11:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
I might call a ship "she", but a cat is an "it", so is a human baby.
Lewis
2018-10-06 16:42:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
I might call a ship "she", but a cat is an "it", so is a human baby.
Around here people get very angry if you use 'it' for a baby. Or even
MORE angry if you use the wrong gender pronoun.
--
Overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 18:05:11 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
I might call a ship "she", but a cat is an "it", so is a human baby.
Around here people get very angry if you use 'it' for a baby. Or even
MORE angry if you use the wrong gender pronoun.
You can't tell the sex of a human baby without looking in its nappy.
Lewis
2018-10-06 20:14:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
I might call a ship "she", but a cat is an "it", so is a human baby.
Around here people get very angry if you use 'it' for a baby. Or even
MORE angry if you use the wrong gender pronoun.
You can't tell the sex of a human baby without looking in its nappy.
Which is why people are super careful to dress their babies in rigidly
gendered clothing and possibly ribbons or pierced ears for girls.
--
SOURCERERS MAKE THEIR OWN DESTINY. THEY TOUCH THE EARTH LIGHTLY.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 20:27:41 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
I might call a ship "she", but a cat is an "it", so is a human baby.
Around here people get very angry if you use 'it' for a baby. Or even
MORE angry if you use the wrong gender pronoun.
You can't tell the sex of a human baby without looking in its nappy.
Which is why people are super careful to dress their babies in rigidly
gendered clothing and possibly ribbons or pierced ears for girls.
Why is it so important? I've often referred to someone's dog as "he" and simply been corrected to "she". Surely the same can happen with babies?
Lewis
2018-10-06 23:37:27 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
I might call a ship "she", but a cat is an "it", so is a human baby.
Around here people get very angry if you use 'it' for a baby. Or even
MORE angry if you use the wrong gender pronoun.
You can't tell the sex of a human baby without looking in its nappy.
Which is why people are super careful to dress their babies in rigidly
gendered clothing and possibly ribbons or pierced ears for girls.
Why is it so important?
I have no idea. It is one thing I have never understood about Americans.
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've often referred to someone's dog as "he" and simply been corrected
to "she". Surely the same can happen with babies?
Maybe. But sometimes people will be deeply offended or genuinely angry.
--
"A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely
foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.: -
Douglas Adams
Peeler
2018-10-07 09:16:52 UTC
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On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 23:37:27 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, the braindead notorious
troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered:
ns or pierced ears for girls.
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Why is it so important?
I have no idea. It is one thing I have never understood about Americans.
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've often referred to someone's dog as "he" and simply been corrected
to "she". Surely the same can happen with babies?
Maybe. But sometimes people will be deeply offended or genuinely angry.
F'up to alt.idiots where ALL your crap belongs! What a bunch of idiots
indeed! <tsk>
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-07 16:35:13 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for
ease of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of
the more sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true
that in French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if
it's male or female? Preposterous!
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
I might call a ship "she", but a cat is an "it", so is a human baby.
Around here people get very angry if you use 'it' for a baby. Or even
MORE angry if you use the wrong gender pronoun.
You can't tell the sex of a human baby without looking in its nappy.
Which is why people are super careful to dress their babies in rigidly
gendered clothing and possibly ribbons or pierced ears for girls.
Why is it so important?
I have no idea. It is one thing I have never understood about Americans.
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've often referred to someone's dog as "he" and simply been corrected
to "she". Surely the same can happen with babies?
Maybe. But sometimes people will be deeply offended or genuinely angry.
A better way I use is to call the baby ugly, or sometimes I'm slightly more polite and say "I guess it'll look better when it grows older". I really don't understand people who think a thing with an enormous bald head is somehow cute.
Peeler
2018-10-06 21:33:10 UTC
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On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 20:14:57 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally challenged,
notorious troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered.
Post by Lewis
Which is why people are super careful to dress their babies in rigidly
gendered clothing and possibly ribbons or pierced ears for girls.
Just after a few replies to the Scottish sow, you sound as ridiculous and
idiotic as him, you fucked up senile! LOL
Peeler
2018-10-06 19:36:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 16:42:05 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally challenged,
notorious troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered.
Post by Lewis
Around here people get very angry if you use 'it' for a baby. Or even
MORE angry if you use the wrong gender pronoun.
And troll-feeding senile idiot no.3 appeared on the scene to swallow the
abnormal Scottish attention whore's latest idiotic bait, hook, line and
sinker! <tsk> What a bunch of senile cretins!
Peter Moylan
2018-10-07 00:46:50 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out.
I have sometimes thought that that is the most memorable sentence in all
of science fiction.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Lewis
2018-10-07 13:11:43 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Lewis
Overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out.
I have sometimes thought that that is the most memorable sentence in all
of science fiction.
It is a good one, and one that I spent more than a little time thinking
about when I was pretty young.

I finally figured out that it was the "without any fuss" that really
made it work/ That and the simplicity of the phrasing.

It is often the case that the most powerful messages are convey with the
simplest words.

"We shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on
the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in
the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall
never surrender."

Every word in there but one is pure Anglo-Saxon English, and it used the
rhetorical trick of repeating a key phrase to drive it home. What's teh
quote about, fighting, what's repeated, "fight".

In Martin Luther King Jr's "I have a Dream" speech he repeats that
phrase 8 times over the course of only a few paragraphs, but he repeats
"Let Freedom ring something like 12 times in the closing minute or two
of his speech.

It's something I think about when I see some nonsense mission statement
using "words" like strategize or phrases like "core competencies".
--
"640K ought to be enough RAM for anybody." - Bill Gates, 1981
Sam E
2018-10-06 16:34:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 10/05/2018 11:13 PM, Peter Moylan wrote:

[snip]
Post by Peter Moylan
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's often hard to tell with cats, unless you lift the tail and look for
testicles.
Post by Peter Moylan
It's not like English, where everyone knows that every cat is "she".
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 18:07:19 UTC
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Permalink
[snip]
Post by Peter Moylan
French has "le chat" for a male cat and "la chatte" for a female one,
but in practice not many people bother checking the sex of the cat
before talking about it.
It's often hard to tell with cats, unless you lift the tail and look for
testicles.
Unless some barbaric owner has removed them. I go by the distance between the two holes.

And with my cats at least, the males have wider faces, same goes for African Grey parrots, which some people claim you need a DNA test to sex them. You don't. I can tell their sex as easily as I can an adult human.
Lewis
2018-10-06 06:47:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
[snip]
If they can't speak English that's their problem.
I think that knowing English should be a requirement for things like
registering a vehicle (in an English-speaking country). Some people don't.
I'm in the "some people don't" category, although I'm not militant or
hardcore about it. I've spent quite a bit of my adult life in other
countries and was always rather amazed at how I and my fellow travelers
just assumed that everyone we encountered would know English - because
mostly they did, to varying degrees. So in this country, (USA), I'm
willing to do my best to talk to anyone. Today, for example, there's a
crew at the house putting on a new roof. Out of the 7 people, only one
apparently speaks English. For the others, I use my High School Spanish
plus what little I picked up during my frequent visits to Spain back in
the 1980's.
When my grandparents came to this country, none of them spoke English.
They each learned, but I imagine that that took a while. To be fair, the
person who became my paternal grandmother didn't know any languages at
all when she arrived, since she was born aboard ship during the trip.
I think people should learn the language of the country they're in only
to make their own lives easier, not to make my life easier. My life is
already easy enough.
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for ease
of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of the more
sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true that in
French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if it's male
or female? Preposterous!
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and four"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.

Stupid language.

I was talking to a native French speakers this week it's he said "French
is a dead language that doesn't know it's dead yet."

I said "any language that needs a government committee to try to
preserve it is terrified of being irrelevant." He agreed.

It's pretty though, there is that.
--
"If 386BSD had been available when I started on Linux, Linux would probably never had happened." Linus Torvalds
Peeler
2018-10-06 08:28:37 UTC
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On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 06:47:15 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, yet another mentally
Post by Lewis
I said "any language that needs a government committee to try to
preserve it is terrified of being irrelevant." He agreed.
It's pretty though, there is that.
And blathering senile idiot no.2 appeared to swallow that abnormal
sociopathic attention whore's latest idiotic troll bait, hook, line and
sinker! <tsk>
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 11:09:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[snip]
If they can't speak English that's their problem.
I think that knowing English should be a requirement for things lik=
e
registering a vehicle (in an English-speaking country). Some people=
don't.
I'm in the "some people don't" category, although I'm not militant o=
r
hardcore about it. I've spent quite a bit of my adult life in other
countries and was always rather amazed at how I and my fellow travel=
ers
just assumed that everyone we encountered would know English - becau=
se
mostly they did, to varying degrees. So in this country, (USA), I'm
willing to do my best to talk to anyone. Today, for example, there's=
a
crew at the house putting on a new roof. Out of the 7 people, only o=
ne
apparently speaks English. For the others, I use my High School Span=
ish
plus what little I picked up during my frequent visits to Spain back=
in
the 1980's.
When my grandparents came to this country, none of them spoke Englis=
h.
They each learned, but I imagine that that took a while. To be fair,=
the
person who became my paternal grandmother didn't know any languages =
at
all when she arrived, since she was born aboard ship during the trip=
.
I think people should learn the language of the country they're in o=
nly
to make their own lives easier, not to make my life easier. My life =
is
already easy enough.
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for eas=
e
of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of the mor=
e
sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true that in
French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if it's male=
or female? Preposterous!
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and fou=
r"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
I like =A499.99 on a radio advert: "quatre vingt dix neuf quatre vingt d=
ix neuf" spoken very quickly.
Stupid language.
I was talking to a native French speakers this week it's he said "Fren=
ch
is a dead language that doesn't know it's dead yet."
I said "any language that needs a government committee to try to
preserve it is terrified of being irrelevant." He agreed.
The government is trying to preserve it? I thought all French spoke it =
as their primary language.
It's pretty though, there is that.
I like the accent, but English spoken with a French accent sounds just a=
s sexy.
NY
2018-10-06 11:30:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and four"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
I like €99.99 on a radio advert: "quatre vingt dix neuf quatre vingt dix
neuf" spoken very quickly.
During WWII a spy in Belgium or Switzerland (not sure whether he was British
or German) was unmasked because he used the French counting system soixante
quarante (74) or quatre vignts dix-neuf (99), forgetting that
French-speaking Belgians and Swiss have simplified their counting system and
use septante, huitante and nonante for 70, 80 and 90, together with single
digits un to neuf.

Mind you the Germans use the four-and-twenty-blackbirds system for counting:
83 is drei-und-achtzig. The French and Germans have the habit of treating
phone numbers as strings of two-digit numbers (so they say the equivalent of
"forty-five, thirty-seven" rather than "four five three seven"). It is weird
to watch Germans writing down a phone number as someone dictates it because
they write the digits out of sequence: funf-und-vierzig [they write down a
five and then a four to the left of it] sieben-und-dreizig [they write down
a seven and then a three to the left of it]. You'd think that they'd buffer
the two digits of each pair and then write them down in normal left-to-right
order, but I've seen some Germans who don't do this.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 15:28:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and f=
our"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
I like =A499.99 on a radio advert: "quatre vingt dix neuf quatre ving=
t dix
neuf" spoken very quickly.
During WWII a spy in Belgium or Switzerland (not sure whether he was B=
ritish
or German) was unmasked because he used the French counting system soi=
xante
quarante (74) or quatre vignts dix-neuf (99), forgetting that
French-speaking Belgians and Swiss have simplified their counting syst=
em and
use septante, huitante and nonante for 70, 80 and 90, together with si=
ngle
digits un to neuf.
Mind you the Germans use the four-and-twenty-blackbirds system for cou=
83 is drei-und-achtzig. The French and Germans have the habit of treat=
ing
phone numbers as strings of two-digit numbers (so they say the equival=
ent of
"forty-five, thirty-seven" rather than "four five three seven"). It is=
weird
to watch Germans writing down a phone number as someone dictates it be=
cause
they write the digits out of sequence: funf-und-vierzig [they write do=
wn a
five and then a four to the left of it] sieben-und-dreizig [they write=
down
a seven and then a three to the left of it]. You'd think that they'd b=
uffer
the two digits of each pair and then write them down in normal left-to=
-right
order, but I've seen some Germans who don't do this.
The UK way is far easier. 01234, spoken as one word. Then 567890 spoke=
n as one word, or sometimes two - 567 890. It's been worked out that mo=
st people can remember 7 digits easily, so 5 and 6 works well. It does =
confuse me though when someone gives me their phone number in an odd seq=
uence, like 0123 4567 890. Mind you, we always used to have freephone n=
umbers beginning 0800, some of which now seem to be 08000. Not sure if =
the size of the area codes changed or not, I do remember when I was a ki=
d our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges together. I used to=
be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
Mark Lloyd
2018-10-06 17:14:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 10/06/2018 10:28 AM, Jimmy Wilkinson Knife wrote:

[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together.  I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
--
80 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2018 12:00:00 AM for 1
day).

Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"Access denied. Thought you could get in?"
NY
2018-10-06 17:46:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together. I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town with
5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS exchange).
But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you had to dial
14 digits.
Party lines were a pain in the arse. My friend when I was at primary school
had a party line and he and his parents were often prevented from making a
phone call because the woman next door could talk for England on the phone!
It was only a few years ago that I learned that party lines were imposed on
customers in specific areas because of lack of wires from the exchange to
the houses; I used to accuse him of having cheapskate parents who paid for a
lower standard of service, thinking that it was a matter of customer choice.

I didn't know that it was possible to dial the person on the party line. I
thought that was the one case where you still had to invoke the help of the
operator. I presume the call didn't actually go via the exchange and simply
used the exchange wire to power the two phones which were connected together
for the duration of the call.

A more modern equivalent of the party line was the DACS (digital access
carrier system) which sent two phone calls (simultaneously, if both people
wanted to use their phones) down the same wire, by frequency-multiplexing
them (like modulating two radio signals on different carriers), and both
people had a small multiplxer/demultiplexer by the master socket.

We had that at my parents' holiday cottage. DACS fell into disfavour (and
extra wires had to be installed by BT) when broadband was launched, because
AFAIK it wasn't compatible with a DACS demultiplexer box.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 18:00:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NY
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together. I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town with
5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS exchange).
But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you had to dial
14 digits.
Party lines were a pain in the arse. My friend when I was at primary school
had a party line and he and his parents were often prevented from making a
phone call because the woman next door could talk for England on the phone!
It was only a few years ago that I learned that party lines were imposed on
customers in specific areas because of lack of wires from the exchange to
the houses; I used to accuse him of having cheapskate parents who paid for a
lower standard of service, thinking that it was a matter of customer choice.
I didn't know that it was possible to dial the person on the party line. I
thought that was the one case where you still had to invoke the help of the
operator. I presume the call didn't actually go via the exchange and simply
used the exchange wire to power the two phones which were connected together
for the duration of the call.
A more modern equivalent of the party line was the DACS (digital access
carrier system) which sent two phone calls (simultaneously, if both people
wanted to use their phones) down the same wire, by frequency-multiplexing
them (like modulating two radio signals on different carriers), and both
people had a small multiplxer/demultiplexer by the master socket.
We had that at my parents' holiday cottage. DACS fell into disfavour (and
extra wires had to be installed by BT) when broadband was launched, because
AFAIK it wasn't compatible with a DACS demultiplexer box.
I had a DACS with myself once. I asked for a second line so I could multiplex two modems together and get double speed. Since the DACS halved the bandwidth before I joined it back together, I gained nothing. I complained and they removed it free of charge, with some grumbling about me not telling them it was for modems. Since I'd never heard of DACS, I didn't know I had to tell them.
Peeler
2018-10-06 19:40:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 12:14:49 -0500, Mark Lloyd, the notorious, troll-feeding
Post by Mark Lloyd
together.  I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
And troll-feeding senile idiot no.4 appeared on the scene, sounding as
retarded as the troll he keeps feeding! LOL
David Kleinecke
2018-10-07 00:12:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together.  I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-07 16:34:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together. I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
You mean they both rang at once and you ignored it if it was your neighbour's code? That would be annoying in the middle of the night.
Lewis
2018-10-07 17:59:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together. I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
You mean they both rang at once and you ignored it if it was your
neighbour's code? That would be annoying in the middle of the night.
Everything about party lines was annoying.
--
The most perfidious way of harming a cause consists of defending it
deliberately with faulty arguments.
Peeler
2018-10-07 19:26:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 17:59:37 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally challenged,
notorious troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered.
Post by Lewis
Everything about party lines was annoying.
What could be more annoying than pesky Usenet trolls and their corresponding
troll-feeding senile idiots, you senile troll-feeding idiot?
Joy Beeson
2018-10-08 01:15:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 17:59:37 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Everything about party lines was annoying.
Except the time my uncle's barn caught fire and *everybody* showed up
to help put it out.

Literally -- they carried the fire out into the gravel road.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-08 15:54:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peeler
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 17:59:37 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Everything about party lines was annoying.
Except the time my uncle's barn caught fire and *everybody* showed up
to help put it out.
Literally -- they carried the fire out into the gravel road.
How did the party line help with that?
Joy Beeson
2018-10-09 02:49:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:54:41 +0100, "Jimmy Wilkinson Knife"
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
How did the party line help with that?
When they heard the emergency ring, everybody picked up.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Peeler
2018-10-09 10:00:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 22:49:27 -0400, Joy Beeson, another mentally challenged
Post by Joy Beeson
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
How did the party line help with that?
When they heard the emergency ring, everybody picked up.
The Scottish troll and attention whore asks, and the senile Yankietard
delivers, instantly! Always the same old story with you senile Yanks! <tsk>
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-09 17:30:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joy Beeson
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:54:41 +0100, "Jimmy Wilkinson Knife"
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
How did the party line help with that?
When they heard the emergency ring, everybody picked up.
What is an "emergency ring"?
Lewis
2018-10-09 22:57:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Joy Beeson
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 16:54:41 +0100, "Jimmy Wilkinson Knife"
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
How did the party line help with that?
When they heard the emergency ring, everybody picked up.
What is an "emergency ring"?
On a party line it was possible to ring every phone. This was normally
used for emergencies, since a party line would be your closest
neighbors. I don't know if it was a standard number you dialed on any
party line or not. I wouldn't be surprised if it was one of the X11
codes, but I really have no idea how that worked since we never had one
and I only occasionally ran into them.

There's a somewhat amusing Doris Day/Rock Hudson movie involving a party
line,. It is not, oddly, called Party Line. It also has a pre-The Odd
Couple Tony Randall in it.

In the US party lines were common through the 1950s, and in rural areas
they were still common in the 1980s. I remember having to deal with a
party line in 1983 because the house I was at was just slightly outside
the Boulder city limits.

This was only a three-party party line (might have been technically 4,
but the 4th house was largely unoccupied), but in some areas party lines
were shared by as many as 16 different numbers.

I was told that in Texas the party lines were carried on barbed wire,
and for many years I thought this was a tall tale, but it turns out
that barbed wire was used in some cases to care phone lines.
--
"Remember -- that which does not kill us can only make us stronger."
"And that which *does* kill us leaves us *dead*!"
Joy Beeson
2018-10-10 22:23:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 22:57:25 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
On a party line it was possible to ring every phone. This was normally
used for emergencies, since a party line would be your closest
neighbors. I don't know if it was a standard number you dialed on any
party line or not. I wouldn't be surprised if it was one of the X11
codes, but I really have no idea how that worked since we never had one
and I only occasionally ran into them.
On a party line, one cranked a generator which rang all phones. If
you wanted another person on the same line, you cranked his
combination of short rings and long rings. If you wanted someone not
on the line, you cranked one long ring, which summoned the operator.

If you wanted the operator to connect you with the far-distant fire
company, you cranked one very long ring.
--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.





---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
https://www.avg.com
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-10 23:20:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joy Beeson
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 22:57:25 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
On a party line it was possible to ring every phone. This was normally
used for emergencies, since a party line would be your closest
neighbors. I don't know if it was a standard number you dialed on any
party line or not. I wouldn't be surprised if it was one of the X11
codes, but I really have no idea how that worked since we never had one
and I only occasionally ran into them.
On a party line, one cranked a generator which rang all phones. If
you wanted another person on the same line, you cranked his
combination of short rings and long rings. If you wanted someone not
on the line, you cranked one long ring, which summoned the operator.
If you wanted the operator to connect you with the far-distant fire
company, you cranked one very long ring.
Did the phones somehow recognise these rings, or was that up to the occupant? It would piss me off to constantly have to ignore rings to my neighbour.
Lewis
2018-10-11 05:45:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Joy Beeson
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 22:57:25 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
On a party line it was possible to ring every phone. This was normally
used for emergencies, since a party line would be your closest
neighbors. I don't know if it was a standard number you dialed on any
party line or not. I wouldn't be surprised if it was one of the X11
codes, but I really have no idea how that worked since we never had one
and I only occasionally ran into them.
On a party line, one cranked a generator which rang all phones. If
you wanted another person on the same line, you cranked his
combination of short rings and long rings. If you wanted someone not
on the line, you cranked one long ring, which summoned the operator.
If you wanted the operator to connect you with the far-distant fire
company, you cranked one very long ring.
Did the phones somehow recognise these rings, or was that up to the occupant? It would piss me off to constantly have to ignore rings to my neighbour.
All the phones rang, and the people were supposed to listen for their
ting pattern before answering.

A large problem with party lines was people eavesdropping, and worse
people refusing to clear the line for an emergency. This was such a
problem that states had to criminalize this.
--
"Love is the triumph of imagination over intelligence." - H. L. Mencken
Peeler
2018-10-11 09:09:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 05:45:16 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally deficient,
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Did the phones somehow recognise these rings, or was that up to the
occupant? It would piss me off to constantly have to ignore rings to my
neighbour.
All the phones rang, and the people were supposed to listen for their
ting pattern before answering.
What's the problem with you, you troll-feeding idiot? Are you another one of
those many seniles who don't have anyone to talk to in RL and are thankful
when a troll comes along who allows them to suck him off?
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-11 14:05:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Joy Beeson
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 22:57:25 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
On a party line it was possible to ring every phone. This was normally
used for emergencies, since a party line would be your closest
neighbors. I don't know if it was a standard number you dialed on any
party line or not. I wouldn't be surprised if it was one of the X11
codes, but I really have no idea how that worked since we never had one
and I only occasionally ran into them.
On a party line, one cranked a generator which rang all phones. If
you wanted another person on the same line, you cranked his
combination of short rings and long rings. If you wanted someone not
on the line, you cranked one long ring, which summoned the operator.
If you wanted the operator to connect you with the far-distant fire
company, you cranked one very long ring.
Did the phones somehow recognise these rings, or was that up to the occupant? It would piss me off to constantly have to ignore rings to my neighbour.
All the phones rang, and the people were supposed to listen for their
ting pattern before answering.
A large problem with party lines was people eavesdropping, and worse
people refusing to clear the line for an emergency. This was such a
problem that states had to criminalize this.
A bigger problem I think would be someone phoning my neighbour at 3am and waking up me and everyone else on the party line.
charles
2018-10-11 07:19:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Joy Beeson
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 22:57:25 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
On a party line it was possible to ring every phone. This was normally
used for emergencies, since a party line would be your closest
neighbors. I don't know if it was a standard number you dialed on any
party line or not. I wouldn't be surprised if it was one of the X11
codes, but I really have no idea how that worked since we never had one
and I only occasionally ran into them.
On a party line, one cranked a generator which rang all phones. If
you wanted another person on the same line, you cranked his
combination of short rings and long rings. If you wanted someone not
on the line, you cranked one long ring, which summoned the operator.
If you wanted the operator to connect you with the far-distant fire
company, you cranked one very long ring.
not all party lines were on operator connected exchanges. My party line,
in the 1960s, behaved like a normal automatic exchange line - except you
couldn't use if if the other party was doing so.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peeler
2018-10-10 23:34:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Tue, 9 Oct 2018 22:57:25 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally deficient,
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
What is an "emergency ring"?
On a party line it was possible to ring every phone.
<FLUSH another heap of idiotic troll fodder>

The abnormal sociopathic Scottish wanker, troll and attention whore demands
his daily feed, and this mentally deficient senile idiot actually delivers!
<tsk>
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-07 20:25:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together.  I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line. The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.

I never heard of more than two customer's being served by a party line
in the UK. That doesn't mean it didn't happen in very rural areas.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-07 21:34:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together. I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line. The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.
I never heard of more than two customer's being served by a party line
in the UK. That doesn't mean it didn't happen in very rural areas.
I take it the voice had to go on both wires or you'd get interference?
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-07 23:07:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 22:34:54 +0100, "Jimmy Wilkinson Knife"
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together. I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line. The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.
I never heard of more than two customer's being served by a party line
in the UK. That doesn't mean it didn't happen in very rural areas.
I take it the voice had to go on both wires or you'd get interference?
Yes.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peeler
2018-10-07 23:40:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Mon, 08 Oct 2018 00:07:03 +0100, Peter Dunce, yet another mentally
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I take it the voice had to go on both wires or you'd get interference?
Yes.
Dunce, you must feel so honoured to have drawn a reply from the gay Scottish
wanker, troll and attention whore! Fucked up bunch of brain damaged senile
idiots all of you! LOL
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-08 07:12:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they
lumped exchanges >>> together.  I used to be able to phone next door
with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town>>
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS>>
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line),
you>> had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line.
My experience too. We had a party line in the 1950s (ALTrincham 1696).
Looking back on it, and thinking about how much telephoning people do
today, it caused amazingly few problems: it was very rare to pick up
the phone and find someone was talking on it.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.
--
athel
bill van
2018-10-08 08:04:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they
lumped exchanges >>> together.  I used to be able to phone next door
with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town>>
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS>>
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line),
you>> had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line.
My experience too. We had a party line in the 1950s (ALTrincham 1696).
Looking back on it, and thinking about how much telephoning people do
today, it caused amazingly few problems: it was very rare to pick up
the phone and find someone was talking on it.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.
My family went from no telephone in the Netherlands until 1959, to a
single line in Canada later that year.
I eventually heard about party lines, but never experienced them.

bill
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-08 15:52:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they
lumped exchanges >>> together. I used to be able to phone next door
with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town>>
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS>>
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line),
you>> had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line.
My experience too. We had a party line in the 1950s (ALTrincham 1696).
Looking back on it, and thinking about how much telephoning people do
today, it caused amazingly few problems: it was very rare to pick up
the phone and find someone was talking on it.
how did the billing work?
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.
Janet
2018-10-08 13:47:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together.  I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line. The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.
In our house, if party A picked up their phone to make a call while
party B was on the line, A could listen in on B's conversation. We were
taught to immediately put down the receiver if the line was in use.
The other household sharing our line often didn't; they were notorious
eavesdroppers.

Janet
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-08 15:48:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 17:12:07 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
Post by David Kleinecke
[snip]
I do remember > when I was a kid our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges >
together. I used to be able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
I grew up on a farm 5 miles from town. You could call someone in town
with 5 digits (that lasted until about 1989 when they put in the ESS
exchange). But to call someone in the next house (on a party line), you
had to dial 14 digits.
We had it easy - no dial on the party line - only an
operator. We were one long and four shorts.
The party-line arrangement I had experience of in the UK was just two
houses on a single line. The "single line" had two wires. The phones
also had an earth/ground connection. The ringing signal was sent on one
of the wires and earth/ground. A phone's bell was onnected to one wire
and ground. The other customer's phone bell was connected to the other
wire and ground. That meant that the phone would ring only in the house
for which the call was intended.
In our house, if party A picked up their phone to make a call while
party B was on the line, A could listen in on B's conversation. We were
taught to immediately put down the receiver if the line was in use.
The other household sharing our line often didn't; they were notorious
eavesdroppers.
It's only human nature to be inquisitive. If you connect a pair of headphones directly to the line (I think I included a series capacitor to filter the DC), you can listen in without picking up.
NY
2018-10-06 17:33:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The UK way is far easier. 01234, spoken as one word. Then 567890 spoken
as one word, or sometimes two - 567 890. It's been worked out that most
people can remember 7 digits easily, so 5 and 6 works well. It does
confuse me though when someone gives me their phone number in an odd
sequence, like 0123 4567 890. Mind you, we always used to have freephone
numbers beginning 0800, some of which now seem to be 08000. Not sure if
the size of the area codes changed or not, I do remember when I was a kid
our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges together. I used to be
able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
My parents' number changed from a 6-digit STD code and a 4-digit phone
number to the same digits but parsed as 4-digit STD code and 6-digit phone
number. The only difference was that if you were phoning another phone on
the same exchange, you needed to dial 6 rather than 4 digits.

The PhONEday happened and 0xxx changed to 01xxx.

At least they weren't in one of the cities that got a brand new STD code. My
grandpa lived in Leeds and his number changed from 0532 xxxxxx to 0113
2xxxxxx. He answered his phone with a pause between the new 2 and the number
that he was used to, whereas I think the "approved" way is "2xx xxxx"
(according to BT purists).

I lived near Reading at the time of PhONEday and Reading's code changed from
0734 to 0118. I was forever seeing shop fronts or headed notepaper giving
the new number as 01734 xxxxxx. So many people made that mistake (and
invested a lot of money in new signwriting or printed letterheads) that I
think BT were toying with creating 01734 as an alternative code in all their
routing tables.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 18:03:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NY
The UK way is far easier. 01234, spoken as one word. Then 567890 spoken
as one word, or sometimes two - 567 890. It's been worked out that most
people can remember 7 digits easily, so 5 and 6 works well. It does
confuse me though when someone gives me their phone number in an odd
sequence, like 0123 4567 890. Mind you, we always used to have freephone
numbers beginning 0800, some of which now seem to be 08000. Not sure if
the size of the area codes changed or not, I do remember when I was a kid
our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges together. I used to be
able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
My parents' number changed from a 6-digit STD code and a 4-digit phone
number to the same digits but parsed as 4-digit STD code and 6-digit phone
number. The only difference was that if you were phoning another phone on
the same exchange, you needed to dial 6 rather than 4 digits.
The PhONEday happened and 0xxx changed to 01xxx.
At least they weren't in one of the cities that got a brand new STD code. My
grandpa lived in Leeds and his number changed from 0532 xxxxxx to 0113
2xxxxxx. He answered his phone with a pause between the new 2 and the number
that he was used to, whereas I think the "approved" way is "2xx xxxx"
(according to BT purists).
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their name, not their fucking number. What use is that?!
NY
2018-10-06 18:58:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by NY
At least they weren't in one of the cities that got a brand new STD code. My
grandpa lived in Leeds and his number changed from 0532 xxxxxx to 0113
2xxxxxx. He answered his phone with a pause between the new 2 and the number
that he was used to, whereas I think the "approved" way is "2xx xxxx"
(according to BT purists).
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd
thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their name,
not their fucking number. What use is that?!
When I grew up in the 1960s, it seemed to be the common practice for
everyone to answer their phone with the name of the exchange and your number
("Hello. Bristol 123456"), so that's how I did it. I wonder if it was partly
so as not to give away your name to a stranger (who might have dialled a
wrong number or even a number at random) until you know who you are talking
to. That seemed to change around the 1980s or 90s, although it may also have
been that I was used to answering with my name at work, and just continued
that at home as well.

My step-grandma (wife of the grandpa in Leeds) had been a secretary before
she retired, but she had the worst telephone manner of anyone I've ever
encountered. Instead of answering with the number or her name, she'd say
"Hellooooooooooooooooo" in a dreary, dying-fall "I really can't be bothered
to answer the phone but I suppose I ought to" voice. Not very impressive or
inspiring. A few years after she died, my grandpa happened to mention the
way that she used to answer the phone and said that he was not very
impressed with it but never felt able to broach the subject with his new
(second) wife, and the longer he left it, the harder it became to mention it
later on.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 20:26:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NY
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by NY
At least they weren't in one of the cities that got a brand new STD code. My
grandpa lived in Leeds and his number changed from 0532 xxxxxx to 0113
2xxxxxx. He answered his phone with a pause between the new 2 and the number
that he was used to, whereas I think the "approved" way is "2xx xxxx"
(according to BT purists).
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd
thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their name,
not their fucking number. What use is that?!
When I grew up in the 1960s, it seemed to be the common practice for
everyone to answer their phone with the name of the exchange and your number
("Hello. Bristol 123456"), so that's how I did it. I wonder if it was partly
so as not to give away your name to a stranger (who might have dialled a
wrong number or even a number at random) until you know who you are talking
to. That seemed to change around the 1980s or 90s, although it may also have
been that I was used to answering with my name at work, and just continued
that at home as well.
I've always just said hello. It reveals nothing and sounds like a normal conversation. Most people will recognise my voice, most people will have phoned the right number, and if not they can either ask or we soon work out it's wrong. For example:

"Hello?"
"Could you give Jim a lift to the church tomorrow?"
"Er.... who?"
"Isn't that Bob?"
"No...."
"Sorry, wrong number."

For a few years after I moved here, I had a number that used to belong to somebody else who had a lot of debts. I got calls telling me to "go fuck myself" and that I was going to be burnt alive if I didn't pay up. I found it quite amusing as I knew the number belonged to someone at another address - my house was bought off someone who took their number with them - so there was no way they were going to turn up here. Although whoever moved into his house could have got into a bit of strife, especially after what I said back to some of them.
Peeler
2018-10-06 21:05:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 19:58:09 +0100, NY, another mentally handicapped,
Post by NY
When I grew up in the 1960s,
Oh, no! Not yet another lengthy senile bullshit story!

<FLUSH senile shit>
Lewis
2018-10-06 20:17:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by NY
The UK way is far easier. 01234, spoken as one word. Then 567890 spoken
as one word, or sometimes two - 567 890. It's been worked out that most
people can remember 7 digits easily, so 5 and 6 works well. It does
confuse me though when someone gives me their phone number in an odd
sequence, like 0123 4567 890. Mind you, we always used to have freephone
numbers beginning 0800, some of which now seem to be 08000. Not sure if
the size of the area codes changed or not, I do remember when I was a kid
our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges together. I used to be
able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
My parents' number changed from a 6-digit STD code and a 4-digit phone
number to the same digits but parsed as 4-digit STD code and 6-digit phone
number. The only difference was that if you were phoning another phone on
the same exchange, you needed to dial 6 rather than 4 digits.
The PhONEday happened and 0xxx changed to 01xxx.
At least they weren't in one of the cities that got a brand new STD code. My
grandpa lived in Leeds and his number changed from 0532 xxxxxx to 0113
2xxxxxx. He answered his phone with a pause between the new 2 and the number
that he was used to, whereas I think the "approved" way is "2xx xxxx"
(according to BT purists).
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd
thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their
name, not their fucking number. What use is that?!
This was common in places where phone service, especially routing,
wasn't very reliable.
--
All things being equal, fat people use more soap.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 20:27:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
Post by NY
The UK way is far easier. 01234, spoken as one word. Then 567890 spoken
as one word, or sometimes two - 567 890. It's been worked out that most
people can remember 7 digits easily, so 5 and 6 works well. It does
confuse me though when someone gives me their phone number in an odd
sequence, like 0123 4567 890. Mind you, we always used to have freephone
numbers beginning 0800, some of which now seem to be 08000. Not sure if
the size of the area codes changed or not, I do remember when I was a kid
our number changed twice as they lumped exchanges together. I used to be
able to phone next door with only 3 digits!
My parents' number changed from a 6-digit STD code and a 4-digit phone
number to the same digits but parsed as 4-digit STD code and 6-digit phone
number. The only difference was that if you were phoning another phone on
the same exchange, you needed to dial 6 rather than 4 digits.
The PhONEday happened and 0xxx changed to 01xxx.
At least they weren't in one of the cities that got a brand new STD code. My
grandpa lived in Leeds and his number changed from 0532 xxxxxx to 0113
2xxxxxx. He answered his phone with a pause between the new 2 and the number
that he was used to, whereas I think the "approved" way is "2xx xxxx"
(according to BT purists).
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd
thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their
name, not their fucking number. What use is that?!
This was common in places where phone service, especially routing,
wasn't very reliable.
I was born in 1975 and the only wrong numbers were people pressing the wrong buttons.
Peeler
2018-10-06 21:34:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 20:17:34 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, another mentally challenged,
notorious troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered.
Post by Lewis
This was common in places where phone service, especially routing,
wasn't very reliable.
What has all this shit got to do with any of the ngs you keep cross-posting
it to, senile troll-feeding cretin?
Peter Moylan
2018-10-07 01:11:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very
odd thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or
their name, not their fucking number. What use is that?!
Call centres also want you to answer with your name. I refuse to give
them the pleasure.

As a child I was taught to answer the phone with "Seymour 534" or just
"534". My father managed to keep that number for his whole life, even
when he moved house. Over the years the three-digit number morphed into
a ten-digit number, with a few intermediate steps, but the last three
digits were always 534.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peeler
2018-10-07 09:14:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 12:11:04 +1100, Peter Moron, another brain damaged,
Post by Peter Moylan
Call centres also want you to answer with your name. I refuse to give
them the pleasure.
As a child I was taught to answer the phone with "Seymour 534" or just
"534". My father managed to keep that number for his whole life, even
when he moved house. Over the years the three-digit number morphed into
a ten-digit number, with a few intermediate steps, but the last three
digits were always 534.
Driveling IDIOT! The troll thanks you muchly for feeding him with another
load of your senile shit, Peter Moron! <tsk>
😉 Good Guy 😉
2018-10-07 17:26:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peeler
Driveling IDIOT! The troll thanks you muchly for feeding him with another
load of your senile shit, Peter Moron! <tsk>
This is sad. Just take this to Usage.English so that they can teach you
how to increase your vocabulary so that you can explain yourself
adequately. this is not something Windows 10 users can help you with.

Good bye.
--
With over 950 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Peeler
2018-10-07 19:27:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by 😉 Good Guy 😉
This is sad. Just take this to Usage.English so that they can teach you
how to increase your vocabulary so that you can explain yourself
adequately. this is not something Windows 10 users can help you with.
Good bye.
Another braindead smartass who doesn't get what this is about! <BG>
😉 Good Guy 😉
2018-10-07 20:14:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peeler
Another braindead smartass who doesn't get what this is about! <BG>
So why are you wasting time with us, braindead smartasses, on Windows
10? We can't help you here.
--
With over 950 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Peeler
2018-10-07 21:29:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 21:14:14 +0100, ������ Good Guy ������, another ridiculous
Post by 😉 Good Guy 😉
Post by Peeler
Another braindead smartass who doesn't get what this is about! <BG>
So why are you wasting time with us, braindead smartasses, on Windows
10? We can't help you here.
The idiot just doesn't get it! LOL
Lewis
2018-10-07 13:39:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very
odd thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or
their name, not their fucking number. What use is that?!
Call centres also want you to answer with your name. I refuse to give
them the pleasure.
As a child I was taught to answer the phone with "Seymour 534" or just
"534". My father managed to keep that number for his whole life, even
when he moved house. Over the years the three-digit number morphed into
a ten-digit number, with a few intermediate steps, but the last three
digits were always 534.
We have a Google voice number that was migrated through various steps
and is the number my father-in-law and mother-in-law got in 1963 when
they were first married. I think Denver had just stopped using named
exchanges but their number was on the PEARL exchange, iirc.

It's a bit of history that there isn't much accounting of. I once spent
a good day finding all the various exchanges that were used, but it took
a lot of searching.

Most of them I can recall just by looking at the keypad, "Oh right, 722
was RACE and 777 was SPRUCE". An outlier was that the University of
Denver had its own exchange, but it became 871 (and even now, most 871
exchange numbers are DU numbers), I guess from UniverSity? That one I've
tried to find some more information on since it doesn't fit any of the
patterns with other exchanges. I may have to trek down to the main
Library and talk to someone.

The first exchange was YORK in 1898, and it was to distinguish new
numbers from the main exchange, but that is so far back that some
numbers included prefix or postfiox letters. "YORK 230-c"

Oh, one little tidbit I did find, when International calls were first
introduce they were to England, Scotland, and Wales. You could call
between 6am and 11am Denver time and the cost was $84 for the first
minute and $26 for each additional minute. In 1927.

Or, put another way, for the cost of 5 1 minute calls, you could buy a
brand new car and have enough money to fuel it for a year, at least.
--
Silence is golden, duct tape is silver.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-07 14:01:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very
odd thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or
their name, not their fucking number. What use is that?!
Call centres also want you to answer with your name. I refuse to give
them the pleasure.
Do they? I usually get:
Me: "Hello?"
Call centre: "Is that Mr Knife?"
Me: "If you don't know, then you shouldn't be calling me."
Call centre: "Excuse me sir?"
Me: "Why did you call me if you don't know who I am, did you just type in a random number? Kindly fuck off."
Call Centre: [NO CARRIER]
Post by Peter Moylan
As a child I was taught to answer the phone with "Seymour 534" or just
"534".
When someone answers me like that I ask them if they're a human or a robot, or ask them if they're an answering machine.
Post by Peter Moylan
My father managed to keep that number for his whole life, even
when he moved house. Over the years the three-digit number morphed into
a ten-digit number, with a few intermediate steps, but the last three
digits were always 534.
Mark Lloyd
2018-10-07 19:02:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 10/06/2018 01:03 PM, Jimmy Wilkinson Knife wrote:

[snip]
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd
thing to do.  When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their
name, not their fucking number.  What use is that?!
Maybe to help the caller realize he dialed the wrong number.

At one time I had a number starting with 926. One day I got a call from
someone (sounded like a teenager) saying "I want some pussy.". I suppose
he thought he was calling 976 (pay services, often phone sex).
--
79 days until the winter celebration (Tue Dec 25, 2018 12:00:00 AM for 1
day).

Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"Think about the bio-mass involved [with the Biblical flood]. What
happened to all the corpses?"

Sharks, for one." [Raoul Newton,
net.fundie.idiot]
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-07 20:00:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[snip]
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd
thing to do. When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their
name, not their fucking number. What use is that?!
Maybe to help the caller realize he dialed the wrong number.
That seldom happens, especially since the invention of phones which store numbers.
At one time I had a number starting with 926. One day I got a call from
someone (sounded like a teenager) saying "I want some pussy.". I suppose
he thought he was calling 976 (pay services, often phone sex).
No, he was looking for the local pet shop to buy a cat. You really do have a dirty mind.
Peeler
2018-10-07 21:32:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 7 Oct 2018 14:02:13 -0500, Mark Lloyd, the notorious, troll-feeding
Post by Mark Lloyd
Maybe to help the caller realize he dialed the wrong number.
At one time I had a number starting with 926. One day I got a call from
someone (sounded like a teenager) saying "I want some pussy.". I suppose
he thought he was calling 976 (pay services, often phone sex).
The unwashed Scottish sociopathic wanker and troll just wants your gob ...on
his cock, senile Yankietard! And he gets it, time and again! He really got a
knack for making senile Yankietards suck him off, time and again! <BG>
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-08 10:49:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[snip]
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I've never answered my phone with the number and thought it a very odd
thing to do.  When I phone someone, I want to hear "hello" or their
name, not their fucking number.  What use is that?!
Maybe to help the caller realize he dialed the wrong number.
At one time I had a number starting with 926. One day I got a call from
someone (sounded like a teenager) saying "I want some pussy.". I suppose
he thought he was calling 976 (pay services, often phone sex).
PDFTT

beware xpost w10 and aue

FU to alt.comp.os.windows-10 only
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peeler
2018-10-06 19:43:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 18:33:56 +0100, NY, another mentally handicapped,
troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered:

<FLUSH senile bullshit unread>

What has all this sick shit got to do with the groups you keep crossposting
it to? Just after a few replies to the abnormal Scottish troll and attention
whore, you sound as retarded as him! Such is the "power" of his idiocy! <BG>
Wolf K
2018-10-07 02:13:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peeler
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 18:33:56 +0100, NY, another mentally handicapped,
<FLUSH senile bullshit unread>
What has all this sick shit got to do with the groups you keep crossposting
it to? Just after a few replies to the abnormal Scottish troll and attention
whore, you sound as retarded as him! Such is the "power" of his idiocy! <BG>
Beware of the Power! It infects everyone! Even you!
--
Wolf K
kirkwood40.blogspot.com
Complexity is not a condition to be tamed, but a lesson to be learned.
(James Bridley, 2018)
Peeler
2018-10-07 09:08:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Wolf K
Post by Peeler
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 18:33:56 +0100, NY, another mentally handicapped,
<FLUSH senile bullshit unread>
What has all this sick shit got to do with the groups you keep crossposting
it to? Just after a few replies to the abnormal Scottish troll and attention
whore, you sound as retarded as him! Such is the "power" of his idiocy! <BG>
Beware of the Power! It infects everyone! Even you!
That's right! And I AM always wary of that!
Peeler
2018-10-06 19:37:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 12:30:21 +0100, NY, another mentally handicapped,
troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered:

<FLUSH another load of typical senile bullshit>

And idiot no.4 appeared to suck the abnormal gay Scottish wanker's cock! LOL
Peter Moylan
2018-10-07 01:02:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NY
Post by Lewis
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties
and four" It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at
all.
I like €99.99 on a radio advert: "quatre vingt dix neuf quatre
vingt dix neuf" spoken very quickly.
During WWII a spy in Belgium or Switzerland (not sure whether he was
British or German) was unmasked because he used the French counting
system soixante quarante (74) or quatre vignts dix-neuf (99),
forgetting that French-speaking Belgians and Swiss have simplified
their counting system and use septante, huitante and nonante for 70,
80 and 90, together with single digits un to neuf.
It's slightly more complicated than that. The Belgians use septante and
nonante, but mostly stick to quatre-vingts for 80. Huitante is used only
in some parts of Switzerland. Octante is occasionally heard but I don't
know the regional distribution. I think Quebec uses the same number
words as in France.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Lewis
2018-10-06 16:38:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
[snip]
If they can't speak English that's their problem.
I think that knowing English should be a requirement for things like
registering a vehicle (in an English-speaking country). Some people don't.
I'm in the "some people don't" category, although I'm not militant or
hardcore about it. I've spent quite a bit of my adult life in other
countries and was always rather amazed at how I and my fellow travelers
just assumed that everyone we encountered would know English - because
mostly they did, to varying degrees. So in this country, (USA), I'm
willing to do my best to talk to anyone. Today, for example, there's a
crew at the house putting on a new roof. Out of the 7 people, only one
apparently speaks English. For the others, I use my High School Spanish
plus what little I picked up during my frequent visits to Spain back in
the 1980's.
When my grandparents came to this country, none of them spoke English.
They each learned, but I imagine that that took a while. To be fair, the
person who became my paternal grandmother didn't know any languages at
all when she arrived, since she was born aboard ship during the trip.
I think people should learn the language of the country they're in only
to make their own lives easier, not to make my life easier. My life is
already easy enough.
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for ease
of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of the more
sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true that in
French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if it's male
or female? Preposterous!
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and four"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
I like €99.99 on a radio advert: "quatre vingt dix neuf quatre vingt dix neuf" spoken very quickly.
Post by Lewis
Stupid language.
I was talking to a native French speakers this week it's he said "French
is a dead language that doesn't know it's dead yet."
I said "any language that needs a government committee to try to
preserve it is terrified of being irrelevant." He agreed.
The government is trying to preserve it? I thought all French spoke
it as their primary language.
This is news to you?

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Académie_française>

A few years back, France tried to make the word 'jeans' illegal, and
banned any non-French origin words from official records, or some such.

It appears the only thing the French hate more than the creeping
influence of English is the creeping influence of non-French French
speakers, like Canadians or Algerians.

The Academy still refuses to acknowledge a female form of "minister",
which all other French speaking countries use, insisting that the
masculine form is "good enough: to include women.

Teh committe, unsurprisingly, is mostly ancient men, as the appointments
are for life and new appointees are only made to replace "immortals" who
have died. In a wild stroke of progressiveness, they will no long
appoint a new member who is over 75, so the youth quake cometh!

Some random links I found on the google.

<https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/8820304/Frances-Academie-francaise-battles-to-protect-language-from-English.html>

<https://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/15/world/ban-english-french-bicker-on-barricades.html>

<https://qz.com/1259707/france-bans-vegetarian-food-words-language-purists-decide-that-soy-milk-should-not-exist/>

But I'm sure there are thousands of others.
--
And I was grounded while you filled the skies I was dumbfounded by
truth; you cut through lies
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 18:06:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
[snip]
If they can't speak English that's their problem.
I think that knowing English should be a requirement for things l=
ike
Post by Lewis
registering a vehicle (in an English-speaking country). Some peop=
le don't.
Post by Lewis
I'm in the "some people don't" category, although I'm not militant=
or
Post by Lewis
hardcore about it. I've spent quite a bit of my adult life in othe=
r
Post by Lewis
countries and was always rather amazed at how I and my fellow trav=
elers
Post by Lewis
just assumed that everyone we encountered would know English - bec=
ause
Post by Lewis
mostly they did, to varying degrees. So in this country, (USA), I'=
m
Post by Lewis
willing to do my best to talk to anyone. Today, for example, there=
's a
Post by Lewis
crew at the house putting on a new roof. Out of the 7 people, only=
one
Post by Lewis
apparently speaks English. For the others, I use my High School Sp=
anish
Post by Lewis
plus what little I picked up during my frequent visits to Spain ba=
ck in
Post by Lewis
the 1980's.
When my grandparents came to this country, none of them spoke Engl=
ish.
Post by Lewis
They each learned, but I imagine that that took a while. To be fai=
r, the
Post by Lewis
person who became my paternal grandmother didn't know any language=
s at
Post by Lewis
all when she arrived, since she was born aboard ship during the tr=
ip.
Post by Lewis
I think people should learn the language of the country they're in=
only
Post by Lewis
to make their own lives easier, not to make my life easier. My lif=
e is
Post by Lewis
already easy enough.
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for e=
ase
Post by Lewis
of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of the m=
ore
Post by Lewis
sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true that i=
n
Post by Lewis
French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if it's ma=
le
Post by Lewis
or female? Preposterous!
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and f=
our"
Post by Lewis
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
I like =A499.99 on a radio advert: "quatre vingt dix neuf quatre ving=
t dix neuf" spoken very quickly.
Post by Lewis
Stupid language.
I was talking to a native French speakers this week it's he said "Fr=
ench
Post by Lewis
is a dead language that doesn't know it's dead yet."
I said "any language that needs a government committee to try to
preserve it is terrified of being irrelevant." He agreed.
The government is trying to preserve it? I thought all French spoke
it as their primary language.
This is news to you?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acad=E9mie_fran=E7aise>
A few years back, France tried to make the word 'jeans' illegal, and
banned any non-French origin words from official records, or some such=
.
Post by Lewis
It appears the only thing the French hate more than the creeping
influence of English is the creeping influence of non-French French
speakers, like Canadians or Algerians.
The Academy still refuses to acknowledge a female form of "minister",
which all other French speaking countries use, insisting that the
masculine form is "good enough: to include women.
Teh committe, unsurprisingly, is mostly ancient men, as the appointmen=
ts
Post by Lewis
are for life and new appointees are only made to replace "immortals" w=
ho
Post by Lewis
have died. In a wild stroke of progressiveness, they will no long
appoint a new member who is over 75, so the youth quake cometh!
Some random links I found on the google.
<https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/8820304/Fran=
ces-Academie-francaise-battles-to-protect-language-from-English.html>
Post by Lewis
<https://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/15/world/ban-english-french-bicker-on=
-barricades.html>
Post by Lewis
<https://qz.com/1259707/france-bans-vegetarian-food-words-language-pur=
ists-decide-that-soy-milk-should-not-exist/>
Post by Lewis
But I'm sure there are thousands of others.
Ah so it's not French disappearing, but French containing too many non-F=
rench words. That makes more sense.
Peeler
2018-10-06 19:39:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sat, 6 Oct 2018 16:38:53 -0000 (UTC), Lewis, the braindead notorious
troll-feeding senile idiot, blathered:

<FUSH senile idiot's troll fodder>

AGAIN? Does the unwashed Scottish wanker's cock taste THAT good to you? <BG>
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-12 00:09:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Lewis
[snip]
If they can't speak English that's their problem.
I think that knowing English should be a requirement for things l=
ike
Post by Lewis
registering a vehicle (in an English-speaking country). Some peop=
le don't.
Post by Lewis
I'm in the "some people don't" category, although I'm not militant=
or
Post by Lewis
hardcore about it. I've spent quite a bit of my adult life in othe=
r
Post by Lewis
countries and was always rather amazed at how I and my fellow trav=
elers
Post by Lewis
just assumed that everyone we encountered would know English - bec=
ause
Post by Lewis
mostly they did, to varying degrees. So in this country, (USA), I'=
m
Post by Lewis
willing to do my best to talk to anyone. Today, for example, there=
's a
Post by Lewis
crew at the house putting on a new roof. Out of the 7 people, only=
one
Post by Lewis
apparently speaks English. For the others, I use my High School Sp=
anish
Post by Lewis
plus what little I picked up during my frequent visits to Spain ba=
ck in
Post by Lewis
the 1980's.
When my grandparents came to this country, none of them spoke Engl=
ish.
Post by Lewis
They each learned, but I imagine that that took a while. To be fai=
r, the
Post by Lewis
person who became my paternal grandmother didn't know any language=
s at
Post by Lewis
all when she arrived, since she was born aboard ship during the tr=
ip.
Post by Lewis
I think people should learn the language of the country they're in=
only
Post by Lewis
to make their own lives easier, not to make my life easier. My lif=
e is
Post by Lewis
already easy enough.
Everyone should speak the same language on the entire planet, for e=
ase
Post by Lewis
of communication. English is the most widespread, and one of the m=
ore
Post by Lewis
sensible ones (no genderised nouns for a start). Is it true that i=
n
Post by Lewis
French a female cat is male, as it's "le chat" no matter if it's ma=
le
Post by Lewis
or female? Preposterous!
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and f=
our"
Post by Lewis
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
I like =A499.99 on a radio advert: "quatre vingt dix neuf quatre ving=
t dix neuf" spoken very quickly.
Post by Lewis
Stupid language.
I was talking to a native French speakers this week it's he said "Fr=
ench
Post by Lewis
is a dead language that doesn't know it's dead yet."
I said "any language that needs a government committee to try to
preserve it is terrified of being irrelevant." He agreed.
The government is trying to preserve it? I thought all French spoke
it as their primary language.
This is news to you?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acad=E9mie_fran=E7aise>
A few years back, France tried to make the word 'jeans' illegal, and
banned any non-French origin words from official records, or some such=
.
Post by Lewis
It appears the only thing the French hate more than the creeping
influence of English is the creeping influence of non-French French
speakers, like Canadians or Algerians.
Even parrots hate it:


Frank Slootweg
2018-10-06 17:49:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife <***@none.com> wrote:
[...]
Post by Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
I like the accent, but English spoken with a French accent sounds just
as sexy.
The other way around:

Englishman in his best French to a sexy lady in the dining room:

"Je t'adore!"

Sexy lady:

"Shut the door yourself sir!"
Peeler
2018-10-06 19:45:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 6 Oct 2018 17:49:05 GMT, Frank Slootweg, another obviously mentally
Post by Frank Slootweg
"Je t'adore!"
"Shut the door yourself sir!"
And troll-feeding senile idiot no.6 appeared to suck off the unwashed gay
Scottish wanker. Just what is it with all you lonely seniles? <tsk>
Peter Moylan
2018-10-07 01:16:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Slootweg
"Je t'adore!"
"Shut the door yourself sir!"
And when once more
She whispers "Ferme la porte"
C'est magnifique.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-07 12:01:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 01:16:10 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Frank Slootweg
"Je t'adore!"
"Shut the door yourself sir!"
And when once more
She whispers "Ferme la porte"
C'est magnifique.
Watch the xposts
[w10 removed]
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-07 16:24:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sun, 07 Oct 2018 01:16:10 GMT, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Frank Slootweg
"Je t'adore!"
"Shut the door yourself sir!"
And when once more
She whispers "Ferme la porte"
C'est magnifique.
Watch the xposts
[w10 removed]
Fuck off.
[w10 added]
George E
2018-10-06 16:45:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On 10/06/2018 01:47 AM, Lewis wrote:

[snip]
Post by Lewis
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and four"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
84 - enough for a family of five (including the guy who can't get high
on just one), to use daily for a fortnight.

42 - what you get when you multiply 6 by 9 :-)

[snipp]
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 18:04:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[snip]
Post by Lewis
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and four"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
84 - enough for a family of five (including the guy who can't get high
on just one), to use daily for a fortnight.
42 - what you get when you multiply 6 by 9 :-)
Er..... ok.....
RHDraney
2018-10-06 22:18:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[snip]
Post by Lewis
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and four"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
84 - enough for a family of five (including the guy who can't get high
on just one), to use daily for a fortnight.
42 - what you get when you multiply 6 by 9 :-)
43 - the smallest positive integer not mentioned in the Bible....r
Jimmy Wilkinson Knife
2018-10-06 22:42:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RHDraney
[snip]
Post by Lewis
French can't even count. The French for "84" is "four twenties and four"
It's a miracle there were any French mathematicians at all.
84 - enough for a family of five (including the guy who can't get high
on just one), to use daily for a fortnight.
42 - what you get when you multiply 6 by 9 :-)
43 - the smallest positive integer not mentioned in the Bible....r
Never read it, but it might also wok with Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
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