Discussion:
What part of speech is "dude"?
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Doc
2012-05-03 06:37:45 UTC
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In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
James Hogg
2012-05-03 06:54:16 UTC
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Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
the Omrud
2012-05-03 08:10:36 UTC
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Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
--
David
Peter Brooks
2012-05-03 09:04:19 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the ‘æsthetic’ craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]

So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Django Cat
2012-05-03 09:15:52 UTC
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Post by Peter Brooks
Post by Doc
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is
"dude"?
Post by James Hogg
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the ‘æsthetic’ craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]
So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Any major dude would know that.

DC

--
John Dean
2012-05-03 10:21:36 UTC
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Post by Django Cat
Post by Peter Brooks
Post by Doc
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is
"dude"?
Post by James Hogg
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the 'æsthetic' craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]
So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Any major dude would know that.
The Dude abides. I don't know about you but I take comfort in that.
--
John Dean
MC
2012-05-03 16:49:55 UTC
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Post by John Dean
Post by Django Cat
Post by Peter Brooks
Post by Doc
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is
"dude"?
Post by James Hogg
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the 'æsthetic' craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]
So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Any major dude would know that.
The Dude abides. I don't know about you but I take comfort in that.
All the young dudes...
--
"If you can, tell me something happy."
- Marybones
the Omrud
2012-05-03 14:39:56 UTC
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Post by Peter Brooks
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the ‘æsthetic’ craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]
So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Not at all - it has returned. Son (25) uses it all the time when
speaking to his friends, and it's prevalent in "The Big Bang Theory".
--
David
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2012-05-03 18:17:24 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Peter Brooks
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the ‘æsthetic’ craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]
So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Not at all - it has returned. Son (25) uses it all the time when
speaking to his friends, and it's prevalent in "The Big Bang Theory".
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Jerry Friedman
2012-05-03 18:56:54 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Peter Brooks
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the ‘æsthetic’ craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]
So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Not at all - it has returned.  Son (25) uses it all the time when
speaking to his friends, and it's prevalent in "The Big Bang Theory".
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
Reenacting a change that happened just about thirty years ago among
the young dudes in my country.

--
Jerry Friedman
Steve Hayes
2012-05-04 02:03:35 UTC
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On Thu, 3 May 2012 11:56:54 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
Reenacting a change that happened just about thirty years ago among
the young dudes in my country.
In my youth I was under the impression that "dude" meant a novice, a tyro, an
inexperienced amateur, as in the term "dude ranch".
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Robert Bannister
2012-05-04 04:11:29 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
On Thu, 3 May 2012 11:56:54 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
Reenacting a change that happened just about thirty years ago among
the young dudes in my country.
In my youth I was under the impression that "dude" meant a novice, a tyro, an
inexperienced amateur, as in the term "dude ranch".
It did, but now it means something else. If words had the same meaning
all the time then just about anybody would be able to speak.
--
Robert Bannister
Peter Brooks
2012-05-04 03:58:45 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
On Thu, 3 May 2012 11:56:54 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
Reenacting a change that happened just about thirty years ago among
the young dudes in my country.
In my youth I was under the impression that "dude" meant a novice, a tyro, an
inexperienced amateur, as in the term "dude ranch".
The OED gives that as the second meaning: '2.2 A non-westerner or city-
dweller who tours or stays in the west of the U.S., esp. one who
spends his holidays on a ranch; a tenderfoot; dude ranch, a ranch
which provides entertainment for paying guests and tourists; so dude
rancher, one who owns a dude ranch. Chiefly U.S. '
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2012-05-04 11:09:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Steve Hayes
On Thu, 3 May 2012 11:56:54 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
Reenacting a change that happened just about thirty years ago among
the young dudes in my country.
In my youth I was under the impression that "dude" meant a novice, a tyro, an
inexperienced amateur, as in the term "dude ranch".
When I first met the word, which was in the context of "dude ranch", it
was unexplained and I understood it to mean something like this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dude#History

The oldest usage was typically applied to a well-dressed male, or
one who is unfamiliar with life outside a large city.

I think I understood a dude to have both characteristics.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
the Omrud
2012-05-04 13:58:09 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Post by Steve Hayes
On Thu, 3 May 2012 11:56:54 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
Reenacting a change that happened just about thirty years ago among
the young dudes in my country.
In my youth I was under the impression that "dude" meant a novice, a tyro, an
inexperienced amateur, as in the term "dude ranch".
When I first met the word, which was in the context of "dude ranch", it
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dude#History
The oldest usage was typically applied to a well-dressed male, or
one who is unfamiliar with life outside a large city.
I think I understood a dude to have both characteristics.
There is a character in the first two or three episodes of Deadwood (he
doesn't last long) who has come from his privileged city background to
make his fortune in the gold fields. Everybody knows his name, but he's
referred to by all as "the Dude".
--
David
R H Draney
2012-05-04 02:42:14 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
I've never watched the show, but had heard that his preferred form of address
was "Dawg"....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Peter Duncanson (BrE)
2012-05-04 11:21:41 UTC
Reply
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Post by R H Draney
Post by Peter Duncanson (BrE)
Those who watch American Idol might have noticed that when the judge
Randy Jackson addresses a contestant he frequently uses "Dude". That is
regardless of whether the contestant is male or female. This is a change
from a few years ago when he used to address male and female contestants
alike as "Man".
I've never watched the show, but had heard that his preferred form of address
was "Dawg"....r
He seems to have moved on from that now that he has been promoted to
"head judge". When the show started in 2002 Randy Jackson was the first
of the judges to comment on each contestant's performance. He seemed
rather inarticulate. Now that he has been promoted into the position
vacated by Simon Cowell he is the last judge to comment and is much more
thoughful and articulate. Obviously he has more time to think while the
other judges are saying their stuff but I think he has improved his
ability to put his thoughts and impressions into words in the context of
the show.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
aruzinsky
2012-05-03 15:31:00 UTC
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Post by Peter Brooks
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
and; 'A factitious slang term which came into vogue in New York about
the beginning of 1883, in connexion with the ‘æsthetic’ craze of that
day. Actual origin not recorded.' [OED]
So a somewhat old-fashioned term.
Not as a replacement for "Sir." There have been incidents of
generation X or Y policemen beating the crap out of teenagers for
calling them "Dude." As a generation X member, I don't blame them.
However, I remember circa 1960, it was popular for teenagers to
address each other as "Man," probably in imitation of the beatnik
character, Maynard G. Krebs, on the TV show, The Many Loves of Dobie
Gillis.
R H Draney
2012-05-03 16:33:59 UTC
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Post by aruzinsky
However, I remember circa 1960, it was popular for teenagers to
address each other as "Man," probably in imitation of the beatnik
character, Maynard G. Krebs, on the TV show, The Many Loves of Dobie
Gillis.
Maynard called people "Dad" more often than he ever said "Man"...you're probably
thinking of Cheech and Chong...in their "Santa Claus and His Old Lady" bit,
"man" occurs 118 times as a form of address....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Horace LaBadie
2012-05-03 18:03:09 UTC
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Post by R H Draney
Post by aruzinsky
However, I remember circa 1960, it was popular for teenagers to
address each other as "Man," probably in imitation of the beatnik
character, Maynard G. Krebs, on the TV show, The Many Loves of Dobie
Gillis.
Maynard called people "Dad" more often than he ever said "Man"...you're probably
thinking of Cheech and Chong...in their "Santa Claus and His Old Lady" bit,
"man" occurs 118 times as a form of address....r
Stoners, dude.
aruzinsky
2012-05-03 22:11:48 UTC
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Post by R H Draney
Post by aruzinsky
However, I remember circa 1960, it was popular for teenagers to
address each other as "Man," probably in imitation of the beatnik
character, Maynard G. Krebs, on the TV show, The Many Loves of Dobie
Gillis.
Maynard called people "Dad" more often than he ever said "Man"...you're probably
thinking of Cheech and Chong...in their "Santa Claus and His Old Lady" bit,
"man" occurs 118 times as a form of address....r
--
Me?  Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Is this based on your memory of the original broadcasts or some recent
viewings? I described my memory of the original broadcasts and I
haven't seen any rebroadcasts. I didn't know who Cheech and Chong
were until much later, but, I clearly remember that, when I was in 8th
grade, we were calling each other "Man" in the school yard. I note
that many very old TV shows are available on DVD. I have DVDs of the
1951 and 1952 episodes of Tales of Tomorrow which was my favorite TV
show when I was 5.
c***@gmail.com
2014-11-12 07:10:14 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
--
David
^The only person who answered the question.

This is exactly what I was trying to learn. I like your style, Dude.
Peter T. Daniels
2014-11-12 14:31:26 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
--
David
^The only person who answered the question.
This is exactly what I was trying to learn. I like your style, Dude.
Doc cee..., are you in the habit of not looking at the answers to questions
for 2 1/2 years?
Peter Moylan
2014-11-13 03:04:53 UTC
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Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
--
David
^The only person who answered the question.
This is exactly what I was trying to learn. I like your style, Dude.
It looks to me as if they both answered the question (correctly) on the
same long-ago day.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2014-11-13 14:19:49 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
--
David
^The only person who answered the question.
This is exactly what I was trying to learn. I like your style, Dude.
It looks to me as if they both answered the question (correctly) on the
same long-ago day.
Both, in fact, in the quoted part, so I wonder why James's answer
didn't qualify.

Maybe PTD will be along in a moment to whine that he said it first.
--
athel
Stefan Ram
2014-11-13 14:37:47 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
^The only person who answered the question.
This is exactly what I was trying to learn. I like your style, Dude.
It looks to me as if they both answered the question (correctly) on the
same long-ago day.
»Noun« is a part of speech.

»Vocative« is a description of this word, but it is not
listed in the »part of speech« lists I have seen so far.

This specific usage of this noun in the vocative I would
tentatively label as an »address word« or an »apostrophe
word«.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2014-11-13 14:44:49 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by c***@gmail.com
Post by the Omrud
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
In the vocative.
^The only person who answered the question.
This is exactly what I was trying to learn. I like your style, Dude.
It looks to me as if they both answered the question (correctly) on the
same long-ago day.
»Noun« is a part of speech.
I think Peter probably knew that.
Post by Stefan Ram
»Vocative« is a description of this word, but it is not
listed in the »part of speech« lists I have seen so far.
That too. I didn't suppose him to be thinking that "vocative" was a
part of speech, but that it was a helpful extension to "noun".
Post by Stefan Ram
This specific usage of this noun in the vocative I would
tentatively label as an »address word« or an »apostrophe
word«.
Would you? Why?

Incidentally, when are you going to learn to do quotation marks?
--
athel
Stefan Ram
2014-11-13 15:06:19 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
»Noun« is a part of speech.
From a web page about part-of-speech tagging:

»"dear" in "Oh dear" and "Dear me" is an exclamation.
In "Yes, dear", on the other hand, it is used as a true
vocative and should be tagged as a noun. Finally, in
salutations like "Dear Martin", it should be tagged as
an adjective.«
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2014-11-13 15:56:50 UTC
Reply
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Stefan Ram
»Noun« is a part of speech.
From a web page
URL? There are web pages and web pages. Some contain heaps of bad
advice, but how can anyone tell if you don't give a URL?
Post by Stefan Ram
»"dear" in "Oh dear" and "Dear me" is an exclamation.
In "Yes, dear", on the other hand, it is used as a true
vocative and should be tagged as a noun. Finally, in
salutations like "Dear Martin", it should be tagged as
an adjective.«
What point are you trying to make here? Nobody doubts that "noun"
refers to a part of speech.

I suspect you think it's a matter of no importance whether you learn to
use quotation marks properly, and maybe it is of no importance, if you
don't care whether casual visitors go away thinking "this guy clearly
doesn't have a clue about how quotation marks are used in English, so
why should I suppose he knows anything else about English usage?"
--
athel
Robert Bannister
2014-11-14 00:07:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Stefan Ram
»Noun« is a part of speech.
»"dear" in "Oh dear" and "Dear me" is an exclamation.
In "Yes, dear", on the other hand, it is used as a true
vocative and should be tagged as a noun. Finally, in
salutations like "Dear Martin", it should be tagged as
an adjective.«
Are you sure that the "dear" on "oh dear" and even "dear me" are not
euphemisms for the devil?
--
Robert Bannister - 1940-71 SE England
1972-now W Australia
Stefan Ram
2014-11-14 00:46:24 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Are you sure that the "dear" on "oh dear" and even "dear me" are not
euphemisms
Once, I used to worry about »dear«, too, just like most
people do today. »What if ...?«, did I ask. I already must
have said it at some point in my life.

I bought all kinds of dictionaries and old hermetism books.
Nervously I turned the pages, looking up D ..., DE ..., DEA
... . But whenever the books said »Don't be afraid. This
word is not a euphemism for ...«, I used to think »I just
might have not found the right book so far.«

One morning I woke up and I was aware that »dear« is just
»dear«. There is nothing beyond. Now it all seemed so simple.
It always was simple. But my mind was twisted, so I could
not see the simplicity, the beauty: Dear is dear is dear.

That morning I was enlighted. I was released. I was free.
Like someone who was living in Britain for all his life
and then wakes up in the U.S.A.
David Kleinecke
2014-11-14 01:57:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Robert Bannister
Are you sure that the "dear" on "oh dear" and even "dear me" are not
euphemisms
Once, I used to worry about »dear«, too, just like most
people do today. »What if ...?«, did I ask. I already must
have said it at some point in my life.
I bought all kinds of dictionaries and old hermetism books.
Nervously I turned the pages, looking up D ..., DE ..., DEA
... . But whenever the books said »Don't be afraid. This
word is not a euphemism for ...«, I used to think »I just
might have not found the right book so far.«
One morning I woke up and I was aware that »dear« is just
»dear«. There is nothing beyond. Now it all seemed so simple.
It always was simple. But my mind was twisted, so I could
not see the simplicity, the beauty: Dear is dear is dear.
That morning I was enlighted. I was released. I was free.
Like someone who was living in Britain for all his life
and then wakes up in the U.S.A.
An USA-n will write his worst enemy
Dear X
Go to hell
Love Y
Robert Bannister
2014-11-15 02:47:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Robert Bannister
Are you sure that the "dear" on "oh dear" and even "dear me" are not
euphemisms
Once, I used to worry about »dear«, too, just like most
people do today. »What if ...?«, did I ask. I already must
have said it at some point in my life.
I bought all kinds of dictionaries and old hermetism books.
Nervously I turned the pages, looking up D ..., DE ..., DEA
... . But whenever the books said »Don't be afraid. This
word is not a euphemism for ...«, I used to think »I just
might have not found the right book so far.«
One morning I woke up and I was aware that »dear« is just
»dear«. There is nothing beyond. Now it all seemed so simple.
It always was simple. But my mind was twisted, so I could
not see the simplicity, the beauty: Dear is dear is dear.
That morning I was enlighted. I was released. I was free.
Like someone who was living in Britain for all his life
and then wakes up in the U.S.A.
Only the Dear knows what that last paragraph means, but I expect the NSA
have a record of it.
--
Robert Bannister - 1940-71 SE England
1972-now W Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2014-11-14 11:21:33 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Nov 2014 08:07:00 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Stefan Ram
»Noun« is a part of speech.
»"dear" in "Oh dear" and "Dear me" is an exclamation.
In "Yes, dear", on the other hand, it is used as a true
vocative and should be tagged as a noun. Finally, in
salutations like "Dear Martin", it should be tagged as
an adjective.«
Are you sure that the "dear" on "oh dear" and even "dear me" are not
euphemisms for the devil?
In one phrase "dear" might be a euphemism for God.

"Oh dear": "Oh dear Lord" similar to "Oh my God".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Mike L
2014-11-14 23:12:31 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Nov 2014 11:21:33 +0000, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 14 Nov 2014 08:07:00 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Stefan Ram
»Noun« is a part of speech.
»"dear" in "Oh dear" and "Dear me" is an exclamation.
In "Yes, dear", on the other hand, it is used as a true
vocative and should be tagged as a noun. Finally, in
salutations like "Dear Martin", it should be tagged as
an adjective.«
Are you sure that the "dear" on "oh dear" and even "dear me" are not
euphemisms for the devil?
In one phrase "dear" might be a euphemism for God.
"Oh dear": "Oh dear Lord" similar to "Oh my God".
"Dear God! The very houses seem asleep."

Can't remember if Hank Cinq says "Dear God!..." or "Good God! Why
should they mock poor fellows thus?"
--
Mike.
r***@wintersjusd.org
2019-11-01 17:16:13 UTC
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Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
Peter Moylan
2019-11-01 17:32:17 UTC
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Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It took you seven years to thank him?

Vocative case, by the way.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-01 18:02:13 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It took you seven years to thank him?
James was much appreciated when he was here, but he isn't, any more.
Post by Peter Moylan
Vocative case, by the way.
--
athel
Katy Jennison
2019-11-01 18:37:00 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It took you seven years to thank him?
James was much appreciated when he was here, but he isn't, any more.
Post by Peter Moylan
Vocative case, by the way.
Thanks could be relayed. I'm not convinced it's worth it, though.
--
Katy Jennison
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-01 18:48:52 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It took you seven years to thank him?
James was much appreciated when he was here, but he isn't, any more.
Post by Peter Moylan
Vocative case, by the way.
Thanks could be relayed. I'm not convinced it's worth it, though.
Probably not, but James might be pleased to know that he's not
forgotten. He and Cheryl arrived more or less simultaneously, and both
behaved like respected regulars from day 1.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-01 18:41:46 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It took you seven years to thank him?
James was much appreciated when he was here, but he isn't, any more.
And he confirmed he wasn't related to the Richard Hogg who edited the
Cambridge History of the English Language (6 vols.).
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Moylan
Vocative case, by the way.
Lewis
2019-11-01 19:30:53 UTC
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Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It's often an interjection, dude!
--
THE DEATH OF A WARRIOR OR THE OLD MAN OR THE LITTLE CHILD, THIS I
UNDERSTAND, AND I TAKE AWAY THE PAIN AND END THE SUFFERING. I DO NOT
UNDERSTAND THIS DEATH-OF-THE-MIND. --The Light Fantastic
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-01 20:49:00 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It's often an interjection, dude!
Maybe if you greet someone or object to something they're doing by
just saying "Dude!"
--
Jerry Friedman
Lewis
2019-11-01 23:12:46 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lewis
Post by r***@wintersjusd.org
Post by James Hogg
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
It's a noun.
--
James
THank you
It's often an interjection, dude!
Maybe if you greet someone or object to something they're doing by
just saying "Dude!"
Dude! I noes, right!
--
MY MOM IS NOT DATING JERRY SIENFELD Bart chalkboard Ep. AABF06
Curlytop
2012-05-04 18:45:42 UTC
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Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
"Dude" is not a proper word so the question is not applicable.
--
ξ: ) Proud to be curly

Interchange the alphabetic letter groups to reply
Mike L
2012-05-04 22:16:47 UTC
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On Fri, 04 May 2012 19:45:42 +0100, Curlytop
Post by Curlytop
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
"Dude" is not a proper word so the question is not applicable.
You'd prefer "daked", but?
--
Mike.
Peter Moylan
2012-05-04 23:24:29 UTC
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Post by Curlytop
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
"Dude" is not a proper word so the question is not applicable.
"Colourless green ideas sleep furiously."

Not a meaningful sentence, but I think we'd all agree on which of the
words were adjectives, and so on.

"The slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe."

Now we have some nonsense words, but the question "what part of speech
is 'gimble'?" still has a well-defined answer.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
s***@sflseagles.com
2016-11-28 18:07:27 UTC
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Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
Snidely
2016-12-02 10:14:04 UTC
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Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
Cute. A drive-by post that left the original post quoted, but didn't
actually provide a response.

/dps
--
Ieri, oggi, domani
occam
2016-12-02 11:20:21 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
Cute. A drive-by post that left the original post quoted, but didn't
actually provide a response.
For that matter, what part of speech is 'whatever'? I've often heard it
said without the 'dude'.
David Kleinecke
2016-12-02 17:58:10 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Snidely
Post by Doc
In a phrase such as "whatever, dude" - what part of speech is "dude"?
Cute. A drive-by post that left the original post quoted, but didn't
actually provide a response.
For that matter, what part of speech is 'whatever'? I've often heard it
said without the 'dude'.
I think classical grammar would call it an interjection.

I can't think of any witty comment to add.
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