Discussion:
"Full English Brexit"
(too old to reply)
J. J. Lodder
2018-10-03 09:29:38 UTC
Permalink
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"

You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.

I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,

Jan
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-03 10:19:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
Boris was indulging in wordplay.

"Full English Brexit" is a pun on "Full English Breakfast".

I agree that it might be misinterpreted by the Scottish, Welsh and
Northern Irish, the rest of the UK, as being narrowly English.

The Full English Breakfast is not suitable for vegans or vegetarians,
and is not kosher or halal, which narrows it down even more.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
RHDraney
2018-10-03 13:57:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"Full English Brexit" is a pun on "Full English Breakfast".
Given that Weird Al Yankovic is known to prefer writing about food, I've
been trying to put together a parody of the Jerry Lee Lewis song
"Breathless", giving it the title "Breakfast"....r
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-03 10:21:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
J. J. Lodder
2018-10-03 11:06:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
Yes, of course, but still,

Jan
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-03 11:11:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
--
athel
Paul Wolff
2018-10-03 11:43:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
Perish the thought.

Could there be an insidious sub-text? There also exists a Full Irish
Breakfast, and it's just occasionally mooted that the economic
consequences of the current madness is that Ireland might be better off
with an EU exit too.
--
Paul
occam
2018-10-03 12:42:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
 You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
 I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
 It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
Perish the thought.
Could there be an insidious sub-text? There also exists a Full Irish
Breakfast, and it's just occasionally mooted that the economic
consequences of the current madness is that Ireland might be better off
with an EU exit too.
The Full Irish is, in my opinion, a better breakfast. It substitutes
English tea with a pint of (Irish) Guinness. Fishmongers at Billingsgate
market are reputed to have a full Irish at the end of their morning,
after a 4:00am start.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-03 12:46:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
The Full Irish is, in my opinion, a better breakfast. It substitutes
English tea with a pint of (Irish) Guinness. Fishmongers at Billingsgate
market are reputed to have a full Irish at the end of their morning,
after a 4:00am start.
"substituted with"??

In English, when you used to have A and now you have B,

B replaces A
B substitutes for A

and similarly transitivelyL

N replaces B with A
N substitutes B for A
occam
2018-10-03 12:58:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by occam
The Full Irish is, in my opinion, a better breakfast. It substitutes
English tea with a pint of (Irish) Guinness. Fishmongers at Billingsgate
market are reputed to have a full Irish at the end of their morning,
after a 4:00am start.
"substituted with"??
I'll contact my agent and ask him to give you a raise. You are simply
doing a marvellous job proofreading. (What is your day job again?)
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-03 15:12:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by occam
The Full Irish is, in my opinion, a better breakfast. It substitutes
English tea with a pint of (Irish) Guinness. Fishmongers at
Billingsgate market are reputed to have a full Irish at the end of
their morning, after a 4:00am start.
"substituted with"??
I'll contact my agent and ask him to give you a raise. You are simply
doing a marvellous job proofreading. (What is your day job again?)
Posting to usenet? For some it's a hobby.
Marvelous.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Adam Funk
2018-10-03 12:44:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
Perish the thought.
Could there be an insidious sub-text? There also exists a Full Irish
Breakfast, and it's just occasionally mooted that the economic
consequences of the current madness is that Ireland might be better off
with an EU exit too.
What's in the Full Irish Breakfast? Is it distinguishable from the
FEB, or like "Turkish coffee" vs "Greek coffee"?
--
XML combines the efficiency of text files with the readability of
binary files.
occam
2018-10-03 13:00:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
Perish the thought.
Could there be an insidious sub-text? There also exists a Full Irish
Breakfast, and it's just occasionally mooted that the economic
consequences of the current madness is that Ireland might be better off
with an EU exit too.
What's in the Full Irish Breakfast? Is it distinguishable from the
FEB, or like "Turkish coffee" vs "Greek coffee"?
Guinness vs. English tea
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-03 13:26:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
Perish the thought.
Could there be an insidious sub-text? There also exists a Full Irish
Breakfast, and it's just occasionally mooted that the economic
consequences of the current madness is that Ireland might be better off
with an EU exit too.
What's in the Full Irish Breakfast? Is it distinguishable from the
FEB, or like "Turkish coffee" vs "Greek coffee"?
I probably shouldn't even answer this, but I will anyway. In my
extremely limited experience, the FIB has white pudding in addition to
black, and brown soda bread at least as a choice.
--
Jerry Friedman
Adam Funk
2018-10-09 08:41:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
Perish the thought.
Could there be an insidious sub-text? There also exists a Full Irish
Breakfast, and it's just occasionally mooted that the economic
consequences of the current madness is that Ireland might be better off
with an EU exit too.
What's in the Full Irish Breakfast? Is it distinguishable from the
FEB, or like "Turkish coffee" vs "Greek coffee"?
I probably shouldn't even answer this, but I will anyway. In my
extremely limited experience, the FIB has white pudding in addition to
black, and brown soda bread at least as a choice.
OK, thanks.
--
Specifications are for the weak & timid!
--- Klingon Programmer's Guide
Mack A. Damia
2018-10-03 15:46:37 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.

The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html

If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.

For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.

In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
Harrison Hill
2018-10-03 16:38:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
Mack A. Damia
2018-10-03 17:00:24 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 09:38:40 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
Supposedly, the nickname arose from the fact that Field Marshal
Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KG, GCB,
DSO, PC, insisted on a Full English Breakfast every morning - even in
the North African desert.
Snidely
2018-10-11 09:50:32 UTC
Permalink
Mack A. Damia suggested that ...
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 09:38:40 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
Supposedly, the nickname arose from the fact that Field Marshal
Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KG, GCB,
DSO, PC, insisted on a Full English Breakfast every morning - even in
the North African desert.
And how did he dress for breakfast? How many movies did he inspire?

/dps
--
Maybe C282Y is simply one of the hangers-on, a groupie following a
future guitar god of the human genome: an allele with undiscovered
virtuosity, currently soloing in obscurity in Mom's garage.
Bradley Wertheim, theAtlantic.com, Jan 10 2013
Peter Moylan
2018-10-11 10:23:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 09:38:40 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
Supposedly, the nickname arose from the fact that Field Marshal
Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KG, GCB,
DSO, PC, insisted on a Full English Breakfast every morning - even
in the North African desert.
"Even in the desert" makes him sound really extreme. The climate does
make a difference.

I have always been a light breakfast eater. These days it's one crumpet
and a cup of coffee. When I first stayed in Ireland, in a B&B, I was
offered the full Irish. On the first day I tried that for the novelty,
but I soon discovered that it was exactly the right thing to prepare me
for trudging through the wind and rain.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-11 11:43:23 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 03 Oct 2018 10:00:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 09:38:40 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
Supposedly, the nickname arose from the fact that Field Marshal
Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KG, GCB,
DSO, PC, insisted on a Full English Breakfast every morning - even in
the North African desert.
That is one suggestion.

OED:

Many suggestions have been made as to the origin of this phrase, but
none of them is supported by reliable historical evidence. Perhaps
the most plausible is that the second element reflects a colloquial
shortening of the name of Montague Maurice Burton (1885–1952), men's
tailor, and that the phrase referred originally to the purchase of a
complete three-piece suit.
Also popular but unsubstantiated is the belief that the phrase is
somehow derived < Monty , the nickname of Field Marshal Bernard Law
Montgomery (1887–1976). However, the sheer variety of often vague,
purely anecdotal, and mutually contradictory explanations for the
connection—ranging from his wartime briefing style to his
breakfasting habits—makes this less credible. Other suggestions,
... are still more speculative.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Mack A. Damia
2018-10-11 15:27:26 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 11 Oct 2018 12:43:23 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 03 Oct 2018 10:00:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 09:38:40 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
Supposedly, the nickname arose from the fact that Field Marshal
Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KG, GCB,
DSO, PC, insisted on a Full English Breakfast every morning - even in
the North African desert.
That is one suggestion.
Many suggestions have been made as to the origin of this phrase, but
none of them is supported by reliable historical evidence. Perhaps
the most plausible is that the second element reflects a colloquial
shortening of the name of Montague Maurice Burton (1885–1952), men's
tailor, and that the phrase referred originally to the purchase of a
complete three-piece suit.
Also popular but unsubstantiated is the belief that the phrase is
somehow derived < Monty , the nickname of Field Marshal Bernard Law
Montgomery (1887–1976). However, the sheer variety of often vague,
purely anecdotal, and mutually contradictory explanations for the
connection—ranging from his wartime briefing style to his
breakfasting habits—makes this less credible. Other suggestions,
... are still more speculative.
There are quite a few ideas as to its origin.

"They covered this on Word of Mouth. It comes from a German phrase
describing a full dress uniform with brocade etc. It is thought to
have entered the English language by Jewish tailors. An early
reference is in a John Le Carre novel. Nothing to do with Burtons or
Egg and Chips."

"I hate to dispute with the authorities on Word of Mouth, but I have
always understood The Full Monty to be a reference to the menu of
services offered in Dublin's pre world war one red light district -
The Monto. It does have a longer 'proper' name but I can't remember
it."

Apparently, there doesn't appear to be any instances of it having
appeared in print before the 1980s.

Michael Quinion on World Wide Words:

"One suggestion put forward in a newspaper article is that it was
invented in the early eighties by Ben Elton, an alternative comedian,
possibly after the model of the whole shebang, which has long been
known in Britain, though it originated in the US. But this seems
rather unlikely, because my erratic memory is insistent that the
phrase was around before the eighties; this impression is backed up by
several correspondents who say they heard it as far back as the 1950s.
Alas, nobody can provide any documentary evidence for these dates."

"A colleague in the dictionaries department at the Oxford University
Press, who has had the thankless job of writing the entry for this
expression, claims to have found sixteen different stories. A few of
the more common ones are:

a corruption of “the full amount”;

a reference to bales full of wool imported from Montevideo;

- from a TV commercial for Del Monte fruit juice, in which one of the
characters insisted on the full Del Monte;

- gamblers’ jargon meaning the kitty or pot, deriving from the old US
card game called monte;

- the casino at Monte Carlo, in which the full monty would equate with
breaking the bank;

- Field Marshal Montgomery on parade with all his medals;
from Field Marshal Montgomery’s liking for a good breakfast in the
morning;

- being supplied by the British tailors Montague Burton with a
three-piece suit; or

- being provided with a complete wedding outfit from the same firm."

"Field Marshal Montgomery, General Montgomery as he was during the
Second World War, certainly had the nickname Monty (there was a film,
you may recall, with the title I Was Monty’s Double, about a man who
impersonated him). The stories about Montgomery mostly refer to his
liking for a good breakfast, even in the desert during the North
Africa campaign. It is said that the phrase was taken up after the
War, presumably by ex-servicemen, as a name for the traditional
English breakfast of bacon, eggs, fried bread, tomato, mushrooms,
toast, and cup of tea. However, this is just as likely to be a
rationalisation of an existing expression, but attached to a
well-known public figure in the way such things often are. However, I
have been told that it was in common use in transport cafés in the
1950s, so there may be something in it."
LFS
2018-10-11 11:24:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
What nonsense. Asking for a full Monty for breakfast could result in an
interesting response. Especially in Sheffield.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-10-11 12:42:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
What nonsense. Asking for a full Monty for breakfast could result in an
interesting response. Especially in Sheffield.
<smile>
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Katy Jennison
2018-10-11 15:15:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by LFS
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
What nonsense. Asking for a full Monty for breakfast could result in an
interesting response. Especially in Sheffield.
<smile>
<giggle>
--
Katy Jennison
Mack A. Damia
2018-10-11 15:30:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 3 Oct 2018 13:11:16 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
But it can include them.
The traditional Full English Breakfast may include cereals, porridge
or stewed prunes, melon, yogurt, boiled eggs or bacon and eggs,
grilled fish, sausages, grilled or fried mushrooms or tomatoes with
fried bread, followed by toasted bread and marmalade and tea or
coffee. Modern English breakfast (served in hotels or motels) may
include cereals, bacon and eggs, toasted bread and marmalade with tea
or coffee.
http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/English-breakfast.html
If you wanted to be decadent and treat yourself, you can add bone
marrow, pork crackling, a huge pork chop and home made baked beans to
make a truly full English breakfast feast.
For the connoisseur of the traditional English breakfast, the regional
differences in the pork ingredients add variety into the tradition,
but if you wanted to add even more tradition, try adding Anglo Saxon
dishes like baked halibut steaks, fried whiting, stewed figs, pheasant
legs, collared tongue, kidneys on toast, sausages with fried bread,
pigs cheek, bubble and squeak, and Melton pork pie to your spread.
In short, a Full Monty can include practically anything. That is the
way the meal traditionally evolved.
"Full Monty" and "full English" are synonyms.
What nonsense. Asking for a full Monty for breakfast could result in an
interesting response. Especially in Sheffield.
Obviously the term became familiar after the release of the film, and
that is the explanation you will get from many who don't know the
historical details of the mystery of the term.

Quinion:

"Field Marshal Montgomery, General Montgomery as he was during the
Second World War, certainly had the nickname Monty (there was a film,
you may recall, with the title I Was Monty’s Double, about a man who
impersonated him). The stories about Montgomery mostly refer to his
liking for a good breakfast, even in the desert during the North
Africa campaign. It is said that the phrase was taken up after the
War, presumably by ex-servicemen, as a name for the traditional
English breakfast of bacon, eggs, fried bread, tomato, mushrooms,
toast, and cup of tea. However, this is just as likely to be a
rationalisation of an existing expression, but attached to a
well-known public figure in the way such things often are. However, I
have been told that it was in common use in transport cafés in the
1950s, so there may be something in it."

J. J. Lodder
2018-10-03 17:33:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
though all agree that it doesn't consist of croissants and coffee.
Yws, but unfortunately the French breakfast
is evolving in the wrong direction,
with ever more extras and add-ons,
(with a corresponding price increase)

Jan
Jenny Telia
2018-10-03 12:24:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
Oh, no! You may have unwittingly unleashed the beast that is Macadamia.
He has a whole newsgroup to himself where he 'explains' what it is.
Fotos and evryfink.

subscribe to: alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-10-03 14:46:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
It are a play on words; the "Full English Breakfast" is a well-worn
phrase (even if debate still rages as to what it consists of)
Oh, no! You may have unwittingly unleashed the beast that is
Macadamia. He has a whole newsgroup to himself where he 'explains'
what it is. Fotos and evryfink.
alt.2eggs.sausage.beans.tomatoes.2toast.largetea.cheerslove
It was an existing group prior to the macademical in-curr-sion, IIRC.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
occam
2018-10-03 12:50:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
"Full British Brexit" according to the press.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/boris-johnson-calls-for-a-full-british-brexit-1-4758860
Post by J. J. Lodder
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
Jan
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-03 13:38:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
"Full British Brexit" according to the press.
https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/boris-johnson-calls-for-a-full-british-brexit-1-4758860
...
The English press as well as the Scottish, according to Google, so
Johnson was politically correct in the literal as well as the popular
sense. I wonder whether Jan saw a mistranslation.

"Full English Brexit" does exist, however, as the title of a song by
Billy Bragg and in a blog post or two.
--
Jerry Friedman
HVS
2018-10-03 13:47:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
"Full British Brexit" according to the press.
https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/boris-johnson-calls-for-a-full-british-
brexit-1-4758860
...
The English press as well as the Scottish, according to Google, so
Johnson was politically correct in the literal as well as the popular
sense. I wonder whether Jan saw a mistranslation.
"Full English Brexit" does exist, however, as the title of a song by
Billy Bragg and in a blog post or two.
It wouldn't have surprised me, though, if Johnson had, in fact, said "Full
English Brexit" -- he seems a likely candidate (along with Rees-Mogg) for
someone who generally writes off the "other" countries of Britain as
insignificant.

(The border with Northern Ireland clearly didn't remotely count as anything
other than a minor administrative matter for the "leave" campaigners.)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-03 14:17:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
"Full British Brexit" according to the press.
https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/boris-johnson-calls-for-a-full-british-brexit-1-4758860
...
The English press as well as the Scottish, according to Google, so
Johnson was politically correct in the literal as well as the popular
sense. I wonder whether Jan saw a mistranslation.
Nah. Typical EU tactic of fake news on some minor point to distract
from the telling and irrefutable critique of the insidious and dark
evils of federalisation and discredit its author. Don't be fooled into
thinking it an 'honest' mistake!
Lewis
2018-10-03 18:09:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
"Full British Brexit" according to the press.
https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/boris-johnson-calls-for-a-full-british-brexit-1-4758860
...
The English press as well as the Scottish, according to Google, so
Johnson was politically correct in the literal as well as the popular
sense. I wonder whether Jan saw a mistranslation.
Nah. Typical EU tactic of fake news on some minor point to distract
from the telling and irrefutable critique of the insidious and dark
evils of federalisation and discredit its author. Don't be fooled into
thinking it an 'honest' mistake!
How the fuck did you get out of my skip?
--
Support bacteria - they're the only culture some people have.
J. J. Lodder
2018-10-03 18:01:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
"Full British Brexit" according to the press.
https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/boris-johnson-calls-for-a-full-british-brex
it-1-4758860
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
The English press as well as the Scottish, according to Google, so
Johnson was politically correct in the literal as well as the popular
sense. I wonder whether Jan saw a mistranslation.
Both
"boris johnson" "full british brexit" october 2018
and
"boris johnson" "full english brexit" october 2018
yield surprisingly few relevant results,

Jan
the Omrud
2018-10-03 13:26:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at a
hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it also
included black pudding. I don't dislike black pudding, but I like
haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
--
David
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-03 15:07:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at a
hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it also
included black pudding. I don't dislike black pudding, but I like
haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
Yes, the Full Scottish Breakfast is probably better than its English
cousin, though I like both.
--
athel
Katy Jennison
2018-10-03 16:41:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at
a hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it also
included black pudding.  I don't dislike black pudding, but I like
haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
Yes, the Full Scottish Breakfast is probably better than its English
cousin, though I like both.
+1. If you're driving to Scotland, Tebay Services do a very good one,
to whet your appetite for when you actually cross the border.
--
Katy Jennison
the Omrud
2018-10-03 16:45:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by the Omrud
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at
a hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it
also included black pudding.  I don't dislike black pudding, but I
like haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
Yes, the Full Scottish Breakfast is probably better than its English
cousin, though I like both.
+1.  If you're driving to Scotland, Tebay Services do a very good one,
to whet your appetite for when you actually cross the border.
Tebay Services do a very good everything. It's worth getting on the M6
just to go shopping there.
--
David
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-04 12:17:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by the Omrud
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at a
hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it also
included black pudding.  I don't dislike black pudding, but I like
haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
Yes, the Full Scottish Breakfast is probably better than its English
cousin, though I like both.
+1.  If you're driving to Scotland, Tebay Services do a very good one,
to whet your appetite for when you actually cross the border.
Tebay Services do a very good everything. It's worth getting on the M6
just to go shopping there.
So I've heard. Unfortunately, the only Tebay I ever get near to is on
the northbound side at Gloucester, and I can only look longingly at it
from the southbound side.
--
athel
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-04 12:33:27 UTC
Permalink
[ ... ]
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by the Omrud
Tebay Services do a very good everything. It's worth getting on the M6
just to go shopping there.
So I've heard. Unfortunately, the only Tebay I ever get near to is on
the northbound side at Gloucester, and I can only look longingly at it
from the southbound side.
Google informs me that they how have it southbound as well. Too late
for me, however, as I don't suppose I'll drive that way again. However,
my sister who lives near Stroud is visiting us later in the month. I'll
ask her what she thinks of Tebay. Maybe too close for them, as they'll
be in a hurry to get home when they drive north, and will have only
just left when they drive south.
--
athel
the Omrud
2018-10-04 13:12:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Tebay Services do a very good everything.  It's worth getting on the
M6 just to go shopping there.
So I've heard. Unfortunately, the only Tebay I ever get near to is on
the northbound side at Gloucester, and I can only look longingly at it
from the southbound side.
Google informs me that they how have it southbound as well. Too late for
me, however, as I don't suppose I'll drive that way again. However, my
sister who lives near Stroud is visiting us later in the month. I'll ask
her what she thinks of Tebay. Maybe too close for them, as they'll be in
a hurry to get home when they drive north, and will have only just left
when they drive south.
Also well worth visiting.
--
David
Adam Funk
2018-10-05 20:04:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by the Omrud
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at
a hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it
also included black pudding.  I don't dislike black pudding, but I
like haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
Yes, the Full Scottish Breakfast is probably better than its English
cousin, though I like both.
+1.  If you're driving to Scotland, Tebay Services do a very good one,
to whet your appetite for when you actually cross the border.
Tebay Services do a very good everything. It's worth getting on the M6
just to go shopping there.
The only motorway service area I'm aware of that isn't a
money-grubbing, nasty ****hole.
--
It takes a thousand men to invent a telegraph, or a steam engine, or a
phonograph, or a telephone or any other important thing --- and the
last man gets the credit and we forget the others. ---Mark Twain
Mack A. Damia
2018-10-03 17:02:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at a
hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it also
included black pudding. I don't dislike black pudding, but I like
haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
The full breakfast is traditionally served at breakfast time, but it
is also popular at other times, usually replacing lunch. Rarely is it
now served every day of the week, reserved instead for the weekend or
on vacation in hotels and Bed and Breakfasts, where no stay would be
complete without one.

Breakfast may begin with orange juice, cereals, stewed or fresh fruits
but the heart of the Full breakfast is bacon and eggs. They are
variously accompanied by sausages, grilled tomato, mushrooms, tea,
toast and marmalade.

Each country in the UK and Ireland also have their own choice of
accompaniments, it is up to the individual just how much they want on
their plate and their preferences. You may find the following:

A Full English Breakfast may have Black Pudding, Baked Beans and Fried
Bread.

A Full Scottish, as above but may also have, Potato Scones (Tattie
Scones), Haggis and Oatcakes.

A Full Irish – Again, as above but may also have White Pudding and
Soda Bread.

A Full Welsh – Laver bread or laver cakes. These are neither bread or
cakes but are made with seaweed, the cakes seaweed cooked with
oatmeal.

An Ulster Fry is not dissimilar to a Full English but may also have
soda bread and is served again, throughout the day.

http://www.om2rome.com/english-breakfast/
the Omrud
2018-10-03 17:07:34 UTC
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A Full Welsh – Laver bread or laver cakes. These are neither bread or
cakes but are made with seaweed, the cakes seaweed cooked with
oatmeal.
And fried in bacon fat. That's important.
--
David
Mack A. Damia
2018-10-03 17:19:26 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by Mack A. Damia
A Full Welsh – Laver bread or laver cakes. These are neither bread or
cakes but are made with seaweed, the cakes seaweed cooked with
oatmeal.
And fried in bacon fat. That's important.
And that is the secret of traditional "fried bread", but it has gone
by the wayside for the health-conscious, and many recipes call for it
to be fried in healthier oils.

I haven't had fried bread for ages, but when I used to eat it
regularly, I would put HP Sauce on it. Yummy.
Paul Wolff
2018-10-03 19:31:35 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by J. J. Lodder
Today's newspaper reports Boris Johnson
as wanting a "Full English Brexit"
You Brits are always splaining to us ignorant foreigners
that it is really Britain, not England they should refer to.
But when push comes to shove you English are worse.
I really don't think that the Boris is hinting
that Scotland could remain,
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at a
hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it also
included black pudding. I don't dislike black pudding, but I like
haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
I'll grant you the merit of haggis, but haggis on scrambled eggs seems
like pancakes on maple syrup - the wrong way up.
--
Paul
the Omrud
2018-10-04 13:14:11 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by the Omrud
FWIW, the Full Scottish Breakfast, which I enjoyed a few weeks ago at
a hotel in the Borders, includes haggis, although in this case it also
included black pudding.  I don't dislike black pudding, but I like
haggis very much, particularly on scrambled eggs.
I'll grant you the merit of haggis, but haggis on scrambled eggs seems
like pancakes on maple syrup - the wrong way up.
Oh, I'm easy. Either way is fine (as per scrambled egg with smoked
salmon). But they must have buttered toast beneath.
--
David
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