Discussion:
Today's Garfield
(too old to reply)
Django Cat
2008-07-02 16:45:06 UTC
Permalink
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?

DC

--
LFS
2008-07-02 16:47:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AIUI breading means rolling in breadcrumbs before frying.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Django Cat
2008-07-02 16:54:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AIUI breading means rolling in breadcrumbs before frying.
Ah. Ah ha. Now it makes sense - http://news.yahoo.com/comics/garfield (strip
for today 2/7).

DC

--
Snidely
2008-07-08 22:58:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AIUI breading means rolling in breadcrumbs before frying.
Ah. Ah ha. Now it makes sense -http://news.yahoo.com/comics/garfield(strip
for today 2/7).
February 7th?

/dps
Roland Hutchinson
2008-07-02 17:04:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'stuffing' or 'dressing' = BrE 'stuffing', I should think -- i.e.
breadcrumbs or the with seasonings that go inside a roasted turkey or,
increasingly nowadays, are cooked separately and served with the bird.

AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
--
Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap [at] verizon.net is heavily filtered to
remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Django Cat
2008-07-02 17:18:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'stuffing' or 'dressing' = BrE 'stuffing', I should think -- i.e.
breadcrumbs or the with seasonings that go inside a roasted turkey or,
increasingly nowadays, are cooked separately and served with the bird.
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.

DC, really, truly going now.

--
Roland Hutchinson
2008-07-02 17:35:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'stuffing' or 'dressing' = BrE 'stuffing', I should think -- i.e.
breadcrumbs or the with seasonings that go inside a roasted turkey or,
increasingly nowadays, are cooked separately and served with the bird.
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'.
Not 'breadcrungs'? (Someday I'll learn to type, honest.)
Post by Django Cat
Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
Well, we just normally say 'fried chicken'. The others are terms of
(culinary) art. You might find 'breaded' or 'in breading' a restaurant
menu, but not the other terms that I used above.

Here's a recipe from the BBC that calls it 'breaded', one of many that
Google turns up in .uk
http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/breadedchickenescalo_88767.shtml

It does, however, appear that .uk use of the word 'breading' in this
connection is exceedingly rare.
--
Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap [at] verizon.net is heavily filtered to
remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Fred Springer
2008-07-02 21:48:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'stuffing' or 'dressing' = BrE 'stuffing', I should think -- i.e.
breadcrumbs or the with seasonings that go inside a roasted turkey or,
increasingly nowadays, are cooked separately and served with the bird.
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Robert Bannister
2008-07-03 02:14:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'stuffing' or 'dressing' = BrE 'stuffing', I should think -- i.e.
breadcrumbs or the with seasonings that go inside a roasted turkey or,
increasingly nowadays, are cooked separately and served with the bird.
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with
flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
I really would expect "crumbed" for all of those, unless a posh French
phrase were available: à la meunière? - no, that's in flour.
--
Rob Bannister
Paul Wolff
2008-07-03 21:09:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
--
Paul
Mike M
2008-07-11 14:33:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food.  Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'.  The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
  Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just
say 'in
breadcrumbs'.  Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
 DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?

<University Challenge>
Otis Redding from Reading, reading reading.
</University Challenge>

Mike M
John Kane
2008-07-11 14:42:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food.  Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'.  The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
  Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just
say 'in
breadcrumbs'.  Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
 DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Most who listen to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's program As
It Happens? Many distances in the UK are given from Reading though
this seems to be less common than in earlier years.

John Kane Kingston ON Canada
Paul Wolff
2008-07-11 20:28:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by John Kane
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Most who listen to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's program As
It Happens? Many distances in the UK are given from Reading though
this seems to be less common than in earlier years.
Inhabiting the centre of the known Universe, what else could
Redingensians expect?

[Candidate for Most Unexpected Redingensian: Cardinal Cormac
Murphy-O'Connor, unless that's Cormac Cardinal Murphy-O'Connor,
Archbishop of Westminster.]

Not that I know the provenance of the word: it might be someone's little
joke.
--
Paul
Mike Lyle
2008-07-12 14:29:01 UTC
Permalink
[...]
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by John Kane
Most who listen to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's program As
It Happens? Many distances in the UK are given from Reading though
this seems to be less common than in earlier years.
Inhabiting the centre of the known Universe, what else could
Redingensians expect?
[Candidate for Most Unexpected Redingensian: Cardinal Cormac
Murphy-O'Connor, unless that's Cormac Cardinal Murphy-O'Connor,
Archbishop of Westminster.]
Not that I know the provenance of the word: it might be someone's
little joke.
"OE: Family or followers of a man named Rêad(a)". So if jest it be,
then, regardless of its dimensions, obscure must it be.
Falkirk has a Redding--so the CA one may be named after that, rather
than the English one.
--
Mike.
Donna Richoux
2008-07-12 15:27:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Falkirk has a Redding--so the CA one may be named after that, rather
than the English one.
There's a bit more drama and mystery on this one than I usually find for
placenames. Somewhat conflicting yet overlapping stories:

Element 1)
A Yankee named Pierson Barton Reading -- apparently pronounced
"redding" -- got a large land grant from the Mexican (Californian)
governor in 1844, near the present town of Redding. Copy of the land
grant decree is on the Web. He mapped out the town in 1862.

Element 2)
The town was founded by Pierson Reading, but at the same time, the
powerful railroad wanted to make it their northern terminus. Supposedly
their agent was named Benjamin Redding and he wanted the name spelled
his way. The city website says

the legislature wanted to name the town Reading
after its founder. The railroad was not happy with
this choice and would not recognize the name. They
wanted the town named after their agent, Redding.
Finally in 1880, everyone gave in and the town was
given the railroad's choice of names

This entire second element smacks of legend, but it would explain why
the change of spelling from Reading to Redding. Personally, I'd be
satisfied if the Benjamin character vanished and it was simply found
that the railroad wanted a phonetic spelling for its major new station.
--
Best -- Donna Richoux
Roland Hutchinson
2008-07-11 15:58:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken
or other fried food.  Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'.  The food is coated lightly with
flour, dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'.  Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is
'in crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in
the stuff. DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
As many as have been to Reading, Pennsylvania, for starters.
--
Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap [at] verizon.net is heavily filtered to
remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Evan Kirshenbaum
2008-07-11 23:06:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Mike M
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading
is pronounced "redding"?
As many as have been to Reading, Pennsylvania, for starters.
Or Reading, Massachusetts. The California city actually spells it
"Redding".
--
Evan Kirshenbaum +------------------------------------
HP Laboratories |Sorry, captain. Convenient
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 |technobabble levels are dangerously
Palo Alto, CA 94304 |low.

***@hpl.hp.com
(650)857-7572

http://www.kirshenbaum.net/
Glenn Knickerbocker
2008-07-11 23:50:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Mike M
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
As many as have been to Reading, Pennsylvania, for starters.
Or played Monopoly.

¬R
Evan Kirshenbaum
2008-07-11 23:57:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Glenn Knickerbocker
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Mike M
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of
Reading is pronounced "redding"?
As many as have been to Reading, Pennsylvania, for starters.
Or played Monopoly.
Nah. We pronounced the railroad property /ridIN/ in my house.
--
Evan Kirshenbaum +------------------------------------
HP Laboratories |It's gotten to the point where the
1501 Page Mill Road, 1U, MS 1141 |only place you can get work done is
Palo Alto, CA 94304 |at home, because no one bugs you,
|and the best place to entertain
***@hpl.hp.com |yourself is at work, because the
(650)857-7572 |Internet connections are faster.
| Scott Adams
http://www.kirshenbaum.net/
Chuck Riggs
2008-07-14 10:37:34 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 07:33:03 -0700 (PDT), Mike M
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food.  Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'.  The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
  Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just
say 'in
breadcrumbs'.  Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
 DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I have
known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
The UnInmate
2008-07-14 10:59:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 07:33:03 -0700 (PDT), Mike M
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with
flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is
'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I have
known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
--
Regards,
Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
Reading has/had an EPL team, and it's been shown here in Canada on Saturday
mornings. That's how I learned the pronunciation.

Another city here has a suburb called "Gloucester," pronounced glow-chester,
so becoming accustomed to the English pronunciation has been more difficult.

Then there is Stratford, Ontario, home of the copycat theatrical festival,
which has its own Thames River, also pronounced "temms."
Pat Durkin
2008-07-14 13:02:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 07:33:03 -0700 (PDT), Mike M
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with
flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd
just
say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these
days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded
haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I have
known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
How many know how to pronounce "Reading, Pennsylvania"? But, really,
yesterday, I heard the duly respected Fareed Zakaria use the
"(b)reading" pronunciation for the "reading" verb, while interviewing a
guest.
Mike M
2008-07-14 13:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 07:33:03 -0700 (PDT), Mike M
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with
flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd
just
say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these
days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on
other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I have
known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
How many know how to pronounce "Reading, Pennsylvania"?  
Not me, that's for sure. Do tell.

Mike M
Pat Durkin
2008-07-14 14:24:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike M
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Chuck Riggs
On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 07:33:03 -0700 (PDT), Mike M
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly
with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd
just
say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these
days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word
on other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading
is pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I
have known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
How many know how to pronounce "Reading, Pennsylvania"?
Not me, that's for sure. Do tell.
OK. But IANAN of Reading, PA. I learned back in grammar school to
pronounce it as in (b)reading--IOW, just like Reading, UK.
Chuck Riggs
2008-07-15 09:38:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Mike M
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Chuck Riggs
On Fri, 11 Jul 2008 07:33:03 -0700 (PDT), Mike M
Post by Mike M
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Fred Springer
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly
with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd
just
say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these
days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock,
breaded sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word
on other pre-prepared food as well.
Near-neighbour Waitrose is to sponsor Reading Football Club next season.
So they'll be breading Reading, too.
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading
is pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I
have known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
How many know how to pronounce "Reading, Pennsylvania"?
Not me, that's for sure. Do tell.
OK. But IANAN of Reading, PA. I learned back in grammar school to
pronounce it as in (b)reading--IOW, just like Reading, UK.
When Pennsylvania, much less Reading, was a faraway place about which
I knew little, Monopoly players set me straight on the correct
pronunciation of Reading. I was probably eight or nine.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
Maria C.
2008-07-16 18:13:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
When Pennsylvania, much less Reading, was a faraway place about which
I knew little, Monopoly players set me straight on the correct
pronunciation of Reading. I was probably eight or nine.
I wasn't sure (yes, I could have just taken your word for it), so I just
called my best friend (since age 10) who was born in PA, went to school
in Mich., and then moved back to PA. She says "Redding" for both the
town and the railroad.

If I ever play Monopoly again, I'll have to remember that. I've always
said "reeding." Live and learn...
--
Maria C.
Chuck Riggs
2008-07-17 13:26:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maria C.
Post by Chuck Riggs
When Pennsylvania, much less Reading, was a faraway place about which
I knew little, Monopoly players set me straight on the correct
pronunciation of Reading. I was probably eight or nine.
I wasn't sure (yes, I could have just taken your word for it), so I just
called my best friend (since age 10) who was born in PA, went to school
in Mich., and then moved back to PA. She says "Redding" for both the
town and the railroad.
If I ever play Monopoly again, I'll have to remember that. I've always
said "reeding." Live and learn...
If you play with the big boys the next time around, the general method
I learned from my aunt, who was a master, is to immediately
concentrate on obtaining the game's first three-property monopoly,
ignoring acquisitions of the Railroads, which are far too expensive in
the beginning of the game, the Utilities, which aren't worth
diddley-squat, the overpriced Broadway and Park Avenue pair beginners
like so much and the Baltic Avenue slums. then start the process of
depleting everyone's funds as quickly as possible by building house
after house, followed by those lovely hotels, even before your
opponents know what hit them. A detail is that the properties towards
the end of each row are slightly better buys than the ones at the
beginning, but sometimes you have to take what you can get.
If you don't play cutthroat and you're up against intelligent players,
a game will drag on for days, so my advice is to go for the jugular.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
R H Draney
2008-07-17 19:20:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
Post by Maria C.
If I ever play Monopoly again, I'll have to remember that. I've always
said "reeding." Live and learn...
If you play with the big boys the next time around, the general method
I learned from my aunt, who was a master, is to immediately
concentrate on obtaining the game's first three-property monopoly,
ignoring acquisitions of the Railroads, which are far too expensive in
the beginning of the game, the Utilities, which aren't worth
diddley-squat, the overpriced Broadway and Park Avenue pair beginners
like so much and the Baltic Avenue slums. then start the process of
depleting everyone's funds as quickly as possible by building house
after house, followed by those lovely hotels, even before your
opponents know what hit them. A detail is that the properties towards
the end of each row are slightly better buys than the ones at the
beginning, but sometimes you have to take what you can get.
If you don't play cutthroat and you're up against intelligent players,
a game will drag on for days, so my advice is to go for the jugular.
That's too much to keep track of...we always spent the first half hour arguing
over who got to be the racecar....r
--
Evelyn Wood just looks at the pictures.
Maria C.
2008-07-18 02:50:04 UTC
Permalink
.....so my advice is to go for the jugular.
WIWAL, the competitive aspect of the game wasn't quite that bad -- until
a male got involved (one of the "big boys" you mentioned). Then, of
course, the game took on all the charm of a knife fight in the alley.

Maria, who will remember to be prepared should we ever meet over a
Monopoly board.
Chuck Riggs
2008-07-18 14:53:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maria C.
.....so my advice is to go for the jugular.
WIWAL, the competitive aspect of the game wasn't quite that bad -- until
a male got involved (one of the "big boys" you mentioned). Then, of
course, the game took on all the charm of a knife fight in the alley.
Maria, who will remember to be prepared should we ever meet over a
Monopoly board.
Both you and Ron have overlooked the several pleasures in bashing the
competition to submission, with their assets turning to dust and their
eyes turning green with envy for your acumen. You have that to look
forward to.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
Mike Lyle
2008-07-18 16:59:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
Post by Maria C.
.....so my advice is to go for the jugular.
WIWAL, the competitive aspect of the game wasn't quite that bad --
until a male got involved (one of the "big boys" you mentioned).
Then, of course, the game took on all the charm of a knife fight in
the alley.
Maria, who will remember to be prepared should we ever meet over a
Monopoly board.
Both you and Ron have overlooked the several pleasures in bashing the
competition to submission, with their assets turning to dust and their
eyes turning green with envy for your acumen. You have that to look
forward to.
A perfect exemplification of the intentions of the game's inventor: he
meant it as an object lesson in the evils of pecuniary greed. Got to
love the Law of Unintended Consequences, though.
--
Mike.
Richard Bollard
2008-07-21 04:55:24 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 18 Jul 2008 17:59:45 +0100, "Mike Lyle"
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Chuck Riggs
Post by Maria C.
.....so my advice is to go for the jugular.
WIWAL, the competitive aspect of the game wasn't quite that bad --
until a male got involved (one of the "big boys" you mentioned).
Then, of course, the game took on all the charm of a knife fight in
the alley.
Maria, who will remember to be prepared should we ever meet over a
Monopoly board.
Both you and Ron have overlooked the several pleasures in bashing the
competition to submission, with their assets turning to dust and their
eyes turning green with envy for your acumen. You have that to look
forward to.
A perfect exemplification of the intentions of the game's inventor: he
meant it as an object lesson in the evils of pecuniary greed. Got to
love the Law of Unintended Consequences, though.
"He"? I thought it was a sheila.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Donna Richoux
2008-07-21 09:48:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Bollard
On Fri, 18 Jul 2008 17:59:45 +0100, "Mike Lyle"
snip discussion of "Monopoly"
Post by Richard Bollard
Post by Mike Lyle
A perfect exemplification of the intentions of the game's inventor: he
[snip]
Post by Richard Bollard
"He"? I thought it was a sheila.
Wikipedia attempts to straighten out the tangled history in its articles
"Monopoly" and "The Landlord's Game." Elizabeth Magie did patent her
game in 1904, and from the picture you can see the resemblance to
Charles Darrow's "Monopoly," dated early 1930s. In 1935 she sold the
rights to Parker Brothers for $500. Lawsuits, conspiracy charges, etc.,
ensued.
--
Best -- Donna Richoux
Chuck Riggs
2008-07-21 12:49:57 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 14:55:24 +1000, Richard Bollard
Post by Richard Bollard
On Fri, 18 Jul 2008 17:59:45 +0100, "Mike Lyle"
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Chuck Riggs
Post by Maria C.
.....so my advice is to go for the jugular.
WIWAL, the competitive aspect of the game wasn't quite that bad --
until a male got involved (one of the "big boys" you mentioned).
Then, of course, the game took on all the charm of a knife fight in
the alley.
Maria, who will remember to be prepared should we ever meet over a
Monopoly board.
Both you and Ron have overlooked the several pleasures in bashing the
competition to submission, with their assets turning to dust and their
eyes turning green with envy for your acumen. You have that to look
forward to.
A perfect exemplification of the intentions of the game's inventor: he
meant it as an object lesson in the evils of pecuniary greed. Got to
love the Law of Unintended Consequences, though.
"He"? I thought it was a sheila.
That wouldn't surprise me, since women make better bean counters,
according to rumour.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
Glenn Knickerbocker
2008-07-14 23:29:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike M
Post by Pat Durkin
How many know how to pronounce "Reading, Pennsylvania"?
Not me, that's for sure. Do tell.
"Northwest Philly"?

¬R
tony cooper
2008-07-14 13:22:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Chuck Riggs
Post by Mike M
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I have
known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
How many know how to pronounce "Reading, Pennsylvania"? But, really,
yesterday, I heard the duly respected Fareed Zakaria use the
"(b)reading" pronunciation for the "reading" verb, while interviewing a
guest.
I would suspect that the number (if the number represents a percentage
of population) of Americans that know how to pronounce "Reading" (UK)
is roughly the same as the number of Brits who know how to pronounce
"Kissimmee" (FL). Perhaps a bit lower since so many Brits have been
in Kissimmee, but they certainly don't seem to know how to pronounce
it before they get here.

Why anyone would blame a foreigner for not knowing how to pronounce a
local name that is not pronounced as it would seem to require is
beyond me, though.

(Normal use of "foreigner" there. No insult to Danes intended)
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Chuck Riggs
2008-07-15 09:46:44 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 14 Jul 2008 09:22:02 -0400, tony cooper
Post by tony cooper
Post by Pat Durkin
Post by Chuck Riggs
Post by Mike M
I wonder how many AmE speakers realise that the UK town of Reading is
pronounced "redding"?
Not all Americans are culturally cut off from Europe. I suspect I have
known your tidbit, Mike, from age 16, 20 tops.
How many know how to pronounce "Reading, Pennsylvania"? But, really,
yesterday, I heard the duly respected Fareed Zakaria use the
"(b)reading" pronunciation for the "reading" verb, while interviewing a
guest.
I would suspect that the number (if the number represents a percentage
of population) of Americans that know how to pronounce "Reading" (UK)
is roughly the same as the number of Brits who know how to pronounce
"Kissimmee" (FL). Perhaps a bit lower since so many Brits have been
in Kissimmee, but they certainly don't seem to know how to pronounce
it before they get here.
Why anyone would blame a foreigner for not knowing how to pronounce a
local name that is not pronounced as it would seem to require is
beyond me, though.
(Normal use of "foreigner" there. No insult to Danes intended)
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a stab
at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it Kiss A Me?
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
tony cooper
2008-07-15 12:50:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a stab
at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it Kiss A Me?
No, but that seems to be the version that tourists come up with. It's
"kiss-sim-ee" with emphasis on the "sim".

For those not aware of why this comes up so much, a tourist booking a
room in the Orlando/Disney World area will often find he has a room in
Kissimmee. Many of the hotels that are convenient to Disney are
located in Kissimmee. Disney itself is located in Lake Buena Vista,
Florida. Orlando is just the nearest large city, and the airport is
in Orlando.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Robert Bannister
2008-07-16 01:04:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by tony cooper
Post by Chuck Riggs
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a stab
at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it Kiss A Me?
No, but that seems to be the version that tourists come up with. It's
"kiss-sim-ee" with emphasis on the "sim".
I was vaguely aware of the stress, but is it "ka-simmy" or "ka-seem-i"?
--
Rob Bannister
Skitt
2008-07-16 01:31:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by tony cooper
Post by Chuck Riggs
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a
stab at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it
Kiss A Me?
No, but that seems to be the version that tourists come up with.
It's "kiss-sim-ee" with emphasis on the "sim".
I was vaguely aware of the stress, but is it "ka-simmy" or
"ka-seem-i"?
Ki-simmy.
--
Skitt (AmE)
Been there; lived not too far from there.
tony cooper
2008-07-16 02:22:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Skitt
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by tony cooper
Post by Chuck Riggs
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a
stab at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it
Kiss A Me?
No, but that seems to be the version that tourists come up with.
It's "kiss-sim-ee" with emphasis on the "sim".
I was vaguely aware of the stress, but is it "ka-simmy" or
"ka-seem-i"?
Ki-simmy.
Visual representation of a word is always difficult, but I would
disagree with your version. "Ki" could be the sound in "kite", but
that's not it. Natives really do say the "kiss" then "sim", then
"mee". Scrunched together, but 3 syllables. That "kiss" is almost a
"cuss" the way some do it. Whether you say "cuss-sim-ee" or
"kiss-sim-ee", you'll be closer than any 2-part representation.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Skitt
2008-07-16 02:33:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by tony cooper
Post by Skitt
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by tony cooper
Post by Chuck Riggs
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a
stab at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it
Kiss A Me?
No, but that seems to be the version that tourists come up with.
It's "kiss-sim-ee" with emphasis on the "sim".
I was vaguely aware of the stress, but is it "ka-simmy" or
"ka-seem-i"?
Ki-simmy.
Visual representation of a word is always difficult, but I would
disagree with your version. "Ki" could be the sound in "kite", but
that's not it. Natives really do say the "kiss" then "sim", then
"mee". Scrunched together, but 3 syllables. That "kiss" is almost a
"cuss" the way some do it. Whether you say "cuss-sim-ee" or
"kiss-sim-ee", you'll be closer than any 2-part representation.
I agree, and I never meant the "kite" sound. "Kiss" it is.
--
Skitt (AmE)
tony cooper
2008-07-16 02:16:39 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Jul 2008 09:04:56 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by tony cooper
Post by Chuck Riggs
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a stab
at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it Kiss A Me?
No, but that seems to be the version that tourists come up with. It's
"kiss-sim-ee" with emphasis on the "sim".
I was vaguely aware of the stress, but is it "ka-simmy" or "ka-seem-i"?
Closer to the first. It's pronounced with 3 syllables and emphasis on
the middle one.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Chuck Riggs
2008-07-16 13:17:30 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 15 Jul 2008 08:50:57 -0400, tony cooper
Post by tony cooper
Post by Chuck Riggs
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a stab
at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it Kiss A Me?
No, but that seems to be the version that tourists come up with. It's
"kiss-sim-ee" with emphasis on the "sim".
Kiss-SIM-ee sounds like an Indian dialect, as I suppose it should.
--
Regards,

Chuck Riggs
Near Dublin, Ireland
R***@med.unc.edu
2008-07-15 16:19:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Riggs
On Mon, 14 Jul 2008 09:22:02 -0400, tony cooper
As relatively foreign as Florida shall remain to me, I'll make a stab
at the pronunciation of one of its over-heated towns. Is it Kiss A Me?
No, but that is quite often the way it is pronounced. As a result,
when the Houston Astros farm team was moved to Kissimmee in 1985, the
name of the team became the Osceola Astros. (Kissimmee is in Osceola
County.) When the team name was changed to the Cobras in 1995, they
became the Kissimmee Cobras.

Take it easy,
Ron Knight
Django Cat
2008-07-06 08:05:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
DC, really, truly going now.
Waitrose's fresh fish counter regularly has on sale breaded haddock, breaded
sole and breaded cod. I'm pretty sure I've seen the word on other
pre-prepared food as well.
As an adjective, for sure, but not the noun 'breading'.

DC

--
Robert Bannister
2008-07-03 02:12:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
AmE 'stuffing' or 'dressing' = BrE 'stuffing', I should think -- i.e.
breadcrumbs or the with seasonings that go inside a roasted turkey or,
increasingly nowadays, are cooked separately and served with the bird.
AmE 'breading' is the coating of breadcrumbs (etc.) on fried chicken or
other fried food. Also known as 'standard breading', 'bound
breading', 'paner à l'anglaise'. The food is coated lightly with flour,
dipped in egg wash, then in bread crumgs, then fried.
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is 'in
crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the stuff.
Not common, but I have seen and heard "crumbing", ie "crumb" as a verb.
--
Rob Bannister
Roland Hutchinson
2008-07-03 02:15:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Django Cat
Interestingly I don't think there's a BrE word for this - we'd just say 'in
breadcrumbs'. Of course, corporate weaselspeak for this these days is
'in crumb' - just in case we sue them if we find there's no bread in the
stuff.
Not common, but I have seen and heard "crumbing", ie "crumb" as a verb.
Crummy corporate weasels! Yum!

(Some may prefer them battered.)
--
Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap [at] verizon.net is heavily filtered to
remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
Barbara Bailey
2008-07-02 17:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Django Cat
2008-07-02 17:19:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? The plot thickens...

DC

--
Roland Hutchinson
2008-07-02 17:40:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? The plot thickens...
No, batter is batter and breading is breading as far as I'm concerned. And
just being dredged in seasoned flour or cornmeal is yet a third (and
arguably a fourth) thing.
--
Roland Hutchinson Will play viola da gamba for food.

NB mail to my.spamtrap [at] verizon.net is heavily filtered to
remove spam. If your message looks like spam I may not see it.
LFS
2008-07-02 17:51:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? The plot thickens...
No, batter is batter and breading is breading as far as I'm concerned. And
just being dredged in seasoned flour or cornmeal is yet a third (and
arguably a fourth) thing.
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Mike L
2008-07-02 20:30:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? �The plot thickens...
No, batter is batter and breading is breading as far as I'm concerned. And
just being dredged in seasoned flour or cornmeal is yet a third (and
arguably a fourth) thing.
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
Herring fillets in egg wash then seasoned oatmeal. FotG.

--
Mike.
Mike L
2008-07-02 20:36:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike L
Post by LFS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? �The plot thickens...
No, batter is batter and breading is breading as far as I'm concerned. And
just being dredged in seasoned flour or cornmeal is yet a third (and
arguably a fourth) thing.
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
Herring fillets in egg wash then seasoned oatmeal. FotG.
... though I grant you that we have to apply a particularly lax*
definition of the term "fillet" when the article comes off a herring.

*It wasn't deliberate, honest.

--
Mike.
Django Cat
2008-07-06 08:07:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? The plot thickens...
No, batter is batter and breading is breading as far as I'm concerned. And
just being dredged in seasoned flour or cornmeal is yet a third (and
arguably a fourth) thing.
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?

--
LFS
2008-07-06 08:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Roland Hutchinson
Post by Django Cat
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? The plot thickens...
No, batter is batter and breading is breading as far as I'm concerned. And
just being dredged in seasoned flour or cornmeal is yet a third (and
arguably a fourth) thing.
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Django Cat
2008-07-06 08:44:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?

--
LFS
2008-07-06 09:36:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep
fry anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the turkey
as flat as possible.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Django Cat
2008-07-06 09:39:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly
breading, either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep fry
anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the turkey as flat
as possible.
I wondered about baking or griling, but I think the seeds would probably burn.
DC

--
LFS
2008-07-06 09:53:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly
breading, either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep fry
anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the turkey as flat
as possible.
I wondered about baking or griling, but I think the seeds would probably burn.
I think I may have baked them once in the past in an attempt to reduce
the family's fat intake but if the result had been any good I would have
carried on doing so. And I didn't.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Mike Page
2008-07-06 09:42:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep
fry anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the turkey
as flat as possible.
This produced an amusing image until I realised that it was advisable to
ensure that the turkey was dead before commencing operations.
--
Mike Page
Google me at port.ac.uk if you need to send an email.
LFS
2008-07-06 09:57:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Page
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep
fry anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the
turkey as flat as possible.
This produced an amusing image until I realised that it was advisable to
ensure that the turkey was dead before commencing operations.
Turkey breast fillets don't bear much resemblance to their source. For
authenticity, schnitzels should be veal but kosher veal is practically
impossible to find and then only at the price of a small house.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Leslie Danks
2008-07-06 11:06:23 UTC
Permalink
LFS wrote:

[...]
Post by LFS
Turkey breast fillets don't bear much resemblance to their source. For
authenticity, schnitzels should be veal but kosher veal is practically
impossible to find and then only at the price of a small house.
The standard "Wienerschitzel" in Austria these days is made from pork. In
most half-way decent restaurants you can also get the genuine veal
version if you pay a bit more. At home, we (and other fat-conscious
people) use (hammered) turkey breast meat. Turkey schnitzels are also
available in restaurants, but are mostly served non-breaded in various
ways.

The secret of schnitzel cookery is to make sure there is enough salt (+
whatever) mixed in the flour. Diesbezüglich MYMV.
--
Les
Robert Bannister
2008-07-07 00:49:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leslie Danks
[...]
Post by LFS
Turkey breast fillets don't bear much resemblance to their source. For
authenticity, schnitzels should be veal but kosher veal is practically
impossible to find and then only at the price of a small house.
The standard "Wienerschitzel" in Austria these days is made from pork. In
most half-way decent restaurants you can also get the genuine veal
version if you pay a bit more. At home, we (and other fat-conscious
people) use (hammered) turkey breast meat. Turkey schnitzels are also
available in restaurants, but are mostly served non-breaded in various
ways.
The secret of schnitzel cookery is to make sure there is enough salt (+
whatever) mixed in the flour. Diesbezüglich MYMV.
I find stuffing mix (a shop-bought mixture of herbs and breadcrumbs)
works well.
--
Rob Bannister
Leslie Danks
2008-07-07 10:49:27 UTC
Permalink
[...]
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Leslie Danks
The secret of schnitzel cookery is to make sure there is enough salt (+
whatever) mixed in the flour. Diesbezüglich MYMV.
I find stuffing mix (a shop-bought mixture of herbs and breadcrumbs)
works well.
I must try that, though I'm not sure if you can get stuffing mix in
Austria since much of the bread goes stale fairly quickly. On a similar
note, I did read in a magazine that a well-known Austrian club footballer
mixes parsley with the flour when he prepares Wienerschnitzel.
--
Les
LFS
2008-07-07 13:50:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leslie Danks
[...]
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Leslie Danks
The secret of schnitzel cookery is to make sure there is enough salt (+
whatever) mixed in the flour. Diesbezüglich MYMV.
I find stuffing mix (a shop-bought mixture of herbs and breadcrumbs)
works well.
I must try that, though I'm not sure if you can get stuffing mix in
Austria since much of the bread goes stale fairly quickly. On a similar
note, I did read in a magazine that a well-known Austrian club footballer
mixes parsley with the flour when he prepares Wienerschnitzel.
Must try that. Better coating than breadcrumbs or any shop-bought mix -
but not as tasty as sesame seeds - is matzah meal (medium).
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
R H Draney
2008-07-07 14:57:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Must try that. Better coating than breadcrumbs or any shop-bought mix -
but not as tasty as sesame seeds - is matzah meal (medium).
The medium is the matzoh?...was that Marshall McLeaven?...r
--
What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
LFS
2008-07-07 15:38:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by LFS
Must try that. Better coating than breadcrumbs or any shop-bought mix -
but not as tasty as sesame seeds - is matzah meal (medium).
The medium is the matzoh?...was that Marshall McLeaven?...r
For that laugh, I forgive you for months of STS prompts.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Robert Bannister
2008-07-08 00:48:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by Leslie Danks
[...]
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Leslie Danks
The secret of schnitzel cookery is to make sure there is enough salt (+
whatever) mixed in the flour. Diesbezüglich MYMV.
I find stuffing mix (a shop-bought mixture of herbs and breadcrumbs)
works well.
I must try that, though I'm not sure if you can get stuffing mix in
Austria since much of the bread goes stale fairly quickly. On a similar
note, I did read in a magazine that a well-known Austrian club footballer
mixes parsley with the flour when he prepares Wienerschnitzel.
Must try that. Better coating than breadcrumbs or any shop-bought mix -
but not as tasty as sesame seeds - is matzah meal (medium).
Of course it would be better, but shop-bought is easy and quick for
those times when you don't have much time and better than plain breadcrumbs.
--
Rob Bannister
the Omrud
2008-07-07 18:00:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leslie Danks
[...]
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Leslie Danks
The secret of schnitzel cookery is to make sure there is enough salt (+
whatever) mixed in the flour. Diesbezüglich MYMV.
I find stuffing mix (a shop-bought mixture of herbs and breadcrumbs)
works well.
I must try that, though I'm not sure if you can get stuffing mix in
Austria since much of the bread goes stale fairly quickly.
What? No Paxo?
--
David
Leslie Danks
2008-07-07 18:28:54 UTC
Permalink
[...]
Post by the Omrud
Post by Leslie Danks
I must try that, though I'm not sure if you can get stuffing mix in
Austria since much of the bread goes stale fairly quickly.
What? No Paxo?
I haven't seen it, but then I haven't searched for it either. Watch this
space...
--
Les
Robert Bannister
2008-07-08 00:47:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leslie Danks
[...]
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Leslie Danks
The secret of schnitzel cookery is to make sure there is enough salt (+
whatever) mixed in the flour. Diesbezüglich MYMV.
I find stuffing mix (a shop-bought mixture of herbs and breadcrumbs)
works well.
I must try that, though I'm not sure if you can get stuffing mix in
Austria since much of the bread goes stale fairly quickly. On a similar
note, I did read in a magazine that a well-known Austrian club footballer
mixes parsley with the flour when he prepares Wienerschnitzel.
Well, that's partway there. I must say that the best Wienerschnitzel
I've ever eaten was in Austria very near the German border in a not
particularly attractive-looking eatery. I think it was genuine
Kalbsschnitzel.
--
Rob Bannister
Richard Bollard
2008-07-09 03:29:37 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 10:57:55 +0100, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Mike Page
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep
fry anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the
turkey as flat as possible.
This produced an amusing image until I realised that it was advisable to
ensure that the turkey was dead before commencing operations.
Turkey breast fillets don't bear much resemblance to their source. For
authenticity, schnitzels should be veal but kosher veal is practically
impossible to find and then only at the price of a small house.
We get the occasional pommy cookbook (and TV programme) over here and
from them, I get the impression that turkey bits and pieces are quite
common over there. Is that right?

Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them if I
looked. Chicken is everywhere.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Robin Bignall
2008-07-09 21:07:38 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 13:29:37 +1000, Richard Bollard
Post by Richard Bollard
On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 10:57:55 +0100, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Mike Page
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep
fry anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the
turkey as flat as possible.
This produced an amusing image until I realised that it was advisable to
ensure that the turkey was dead before commencing operations.
Turkey breast fillets don't bear much resemblance to their source. For
authenticity, schnitzels should be veal but kosher veal is practically
impossible to find and then only at the price of a small house.
We get the occasional pommy cookbook (and TV programme) over here and
from them, I get the impression that turkey bits and pieces are quite
common over there. Is that right?
Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them if I
looked. Chicken is everywhere.
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces. I remember a whole leg
costing a pound, which was good value if you prefer 'red' to 'white'
meat. Maybe they still do, but I gave up on supermarket meat a while
ago. I have to drive to another town a few miles away where there's a
butcher who gets his meat from London's Smithfield meat market in the
early hours of each Tuesday morning. The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and white
meats. They are delicious, but as my wife is now seriously vegetarian
the dog and I have to eat one ourselves after I've cooked it. We have
a turkey week each couple of months.
--
Robin
(BrE)
Herts, England
tony cooper
2008-07-09 22:06:11 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 22:07:38 +0100, Robin Bignall
Post by Robin Bignall
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces. I remember a whole leg
costing a pound, which was good value if you prefer 'red' to 'white'
meat.
Amazing how this group keeps turning up pondial differences. In the
US, chicken and turkey have "white" meat and "dark" meat.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
the Omrud
2008-07-09 22:24:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by tony cooper
On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 22:07:38 +0100, Robin Bignall
Post by Robin Bignall
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces. I remember a whole leg
costing a pound, which was good value if you prefer 'red' to 'white'
meat.
Amazing how this group keeps turning up pondial differences. In the
US, chicken and turkey have "white" meat and "dark" meat.
I don't think I've ever heard poultry leg being described as "red"
before. White and dark for me also. I like legs and thighs myself.
--
David
Robin Bignall
2008-07-10 21:03:51 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 22:24:50 GMT, the Omrud
Post by the Omrud
Post by tony cooper
On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 22:07:38 +0100, Robin Bignall
Post by Robin Bignall
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces. I remember a whole leg
costing a pound, which was good value if you prefer 'red' to 'white'
meat.
Amazing how this group keeps turning up pondial differences. In the
US, chicken and turkey have "white" meat and "dark" meat.
I don't think I've ever heard poultry leg being described as "red"
before. White and dark for me also. I like legs and thighs myself.
I think maybe I picked that up from SWMBO. She's never liked red meat
except for two specific dishes: steak au poivre, and calves' liver
poached in orange juice with banana slices (an "Elle" cookbook recipe
that is utterly delicious). Any meat on the bone (turkey or chicken
legs, pork ribs etc.) is also "red" to her. Now she's vegetarian I've
once again discovered how difficult it is to cook for one and have a
varied diet.
--
Robin
(BrE)
Herts, England
R H Draney
2008-07-09 22:10:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robin Bignall
The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and white
meats.
Ah, particle bird....r
--
What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
Sara Lorimer
2008-07-09 22:30:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Ah, particle bird....r
Particle bird...
--
SML,
with STS
R H Draney
2008-07-09 23:18:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sara Lorimer
Post by R H Draney
Ah, particle bird....r
Particle bird...
--
SML,
with STS
They Might Be Poultry?...r
--
What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
Mike Lyle
2008-07-10 11:01:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robin Bignall
The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and
white meats.
Ah, particle bird....r
Chipbird in BrE. I found that if you let a chicken get too old and
athletic before killing it, you ended up with MDF, medium-density
fibrebird.
--
Mike.
HVS
2008-07-10 11:07:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robin Bignall
The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and
white meats.
Ah, particle bird....r
Chipbird in BrE. I found that if you let a chicken get too old and
athletic before killing it, you ended up with MDF, medium-density
fibrebird.
The bird of directors will see you shortly.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
LFS
2008-07-10 16:37:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robin Bignall
The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and
white meats.
Ah, particle bird....r
Chipbird in BrE. I found that if you let a chicken get too old and
athletic before killing it, you ended up with MDF, medium-density
fibrebird.
The bird of directors will see you shortly.
Oh, I'm so glad I read that *after* our conference paper presentation
today - I would have found it difficult to talk about boards of
directors without seeing a vision of turkeys round a boardroom table..
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
HVS
2008-07-10 17:38:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by HVS
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robin Bignall
The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red
and white meats.
Ah, particle bird....r
Chipbird in BrE. I found that if you let a chicken get too old
and athletic before killing it, you ended up with MDF,
medium-density fibrebird.
The bird of directors will see you shortly.
Oh, I'm so glad I read that *after* our conference paper
presentation today - I would have found it difficult to talk
about boards of directors without seeing a vision of turkeys
round a boardroom table..
I've heard tell some Bs of D have a number of turkeys on them...>
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng and BrEng, indiscriminately mixed
Robert Bannister
2008-07-11 00:58:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by HVS
Post by LFS
Post by HVS
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robin Bignall
The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red
and white meats.
Ah, particle bird....r
Chipbird in BrE. I found that if you let a chicken get too old
and athletic before killing it, you ended up with MDF,
medium-density fibrebird.
The bird of directors will see you shortly.
Oh, I'm so glad I read that *after* our conference paper
presentation today - I would have found it difficult to talk
about boards of directors without seeing a vision of turkeys
round a boardroom table..
I've heard tell some Bs of D have a number of turkeys on them...>
Some are chicken; others are vultures.
--
Rob Bannister
R H Draney
2008-07-10 20:08:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by LFS
Post by HVS
The bird of directors will see you shortly.
Oh, I'm so glad I read that *after* our conference paper presentation
today - I would have found it difficult to talk about boards of
directors without seeing a vision of turkeys round a boardroom table..
That reminds me: did you manage to get through your presentation referencing
Cesare Ripa without breaking into song?...r
--
What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
R H Draney
2008-07-10 14:15:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robin Bignall
The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and
white meats.
Ah, particle bird....r
Chipbird in BrE. I found that if you let a chicken get too old and
athletic before killing it, you ended up with MDF, medium-density
fibrebird.
Not to be confused with oriented strandbird....r
--
What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
LFS
2008-07-10 16:14:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robin Bignall
On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 13:29:37 +1000, Richard Bollard
Post by Richard Bollard
On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 10:57:55 +0100, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Mike Page
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep
fry anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the
turkey as flat as possible.
This produced an amusing image until I realised that it was advisable to
ensure that the turkey was dead before commencing operations.
Turkey breast fillets don't bear much resemblance to their source. For
authenticity, schnitzels should be veal but kosher veal is practically
impossible to find and then only at the price of a small house.
We get the occasional pommy cookbook (and TV programme) over here and
from them, I get the impression that turkey bits and pieces are quite
common over there. Is that right?
Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them if I
looked. Chicken is everywhere.
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces. I remember a whole leg
costing a pound, which was good value if you prefer 'red' to 'white'
meat. Maybe they still do, but I gave up on supermarket meat a while
ago. I have to drive to another town a few miles away where there's a
butcher who gets his meat from London's Smithfield meat market in the
early hours of each Tuesday morning. The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and white
meats. They are delicious, but as my wife is now seriously vegetarian
the dog and I have to eat one ourselves after I've cooked it. We have
a turkey week each couple of months.
When there were four of us at home and none were veggie, I used to buy
turkey rolls too, easy to cook, no waste and very tasty. If there were
any leftovers after a hot meal and a cold meal, I found that the cooked
meat froze very well if you sliced it thinly and covered it with gravy.

We have to drive to London for our meat but I quite like having a direct
relationship with the butcher - in fact, the third generation of the
same family. I am always very envious when I visit the US and see kosher
meat products readily available in most supermarkets.
--
Laura
(emulate St. George for email)
Robin Bignall
2008-07-10 21:15:23 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 17:14:01 +0100, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Robin Bignall
On Wed, 09 Jul 2008 13:29:37 +1000, Richard Bollard
Post by Richard Bollard
On Sun, 06 Jul 2008 10:57:55 +0100, LFS
Post by LFS
Post by Mike Page
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
Post by Django Cat
Post by LFS
I dip turkey schnitzels in sesame seeds which is not strictly breading,
either.
That sounds scrummy. How do you get the sesame seeds to stick on?
First dip in flour, then in beaten egg, then sesame seeds. Very scrummy.
And shallow fry?
That's how I do it but I suppose one could deep fry them (I never deep
fry anything these days). They cook very quickly if you bash the
turkey as flat as possible.
This produced an amusing image until I realised that it was advisable to
ensure that the turkey was dead before commencing operations.
Turkey breast fillets don't bear much resemblance to their source. For
authenticity, schnitzels should be veal but kosher veal is practically
impossible to find and then only at the price of a small house.
We get the occasional pommy cookbook (and TV programme) over here and
from them, I get the impression that turkey bits and pieces are quite
common over there. Is that right?
Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them if I
looked. Chicken is everywhere.
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces. I remember a whole leg
costing a pound, which was good value if you prefer 'red' to 'white'
meat. Maybe they still do, but I gave up on supermarket meat a while
ago. I have to drive to another town a few miles away where there's a
butcher who gets his meat from London's Smithfield meat market in the
early hours of each Tuesday morning. The only turkey they sell, apart
from whole birds, are boned rolls made from a mixture of red and white
meats. They are delicious, but as my wife is now seriously vegetarian
the dog and I have to eat one ourselves after I've cooked it. We have
a turkey week each couple of months.
When there were four of us at home and none were veggie, I used to buy
turkey rolls too, easy to cook, no waste and very tasty. If there were
any leftovers after a hot meal and a cold meal, I found that the cooked
meat froze very well if you sliced it thinly and covered it with gravy.
We have to drive to London for our meat but I quite like having a direct
relationship with the butcher - in fact, the third generation of the
same family. I am always very envious when I visit the US and see kosher
meat products readily available in most supermarkets.
You'd most likely have to drive to London if you lived near here, too,
but not so far. I'm presuming that there would be a selection of
kosher butchers in Golders Green or Finchley, for example, which are
about ten miles away.
--
Robin
(BrE)
Herts, England
Mike M
2008-07-11 14:37:36 UTC
Permalink
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces.  
Bird's Eye used to sell cod pieces, AND cod balls.

Until somebody told them.

Mike M
R H Draney
2008-07-11 15:25:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike M
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces. =A0
Bird's Eye used to sell cod pieces, AND cod balls.
Until somebody told them.
Joe Weider used to sell "Strong Gorilla Balls"; now you can't even find evidence
that this was once so....r
--
What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
Fred Springer
2008-07-11 15:46:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike M
Post by Robin Bignall
Sainsbury's used to sell turkey pieces.
Bird's Eye used to sell cod pieces, AND cod balls.
Until somebody told them.
Mike M
What? That they should be selling *real* pieces and *real* balls?

Don't let's forget the piece of cod that passeth all understanding.

On second thoughts, perhaps we should.
Robert Bannister
2008-07-10 00:42:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Bollard
Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them if I
looked. Chicken is everywhere.
Depends what you mean by pieces. I see turkey breast and turkey leg
available in just about every Coles and Woollies.
--
Rob Bannister
Richard Bollard
2008-07-10 04:40:44 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 08:42:09 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Richard Bollard
Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them if I
looked. Chicken is everywhere.
Depends what you mean by pieces. I see turkey breast and turkey leg
available in just about every Coles and Woollies.
Maybe I should look then. It just seems that turkey recipes abound in
some British cookbooks I have browsed through and also Jamie Oliver
found lots of turkey being fed to kiddies in school dinners. Things
like turkey chops and turkey medallions and all sorts of cuts. Struck
me as unusual so I thought I would ask here.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Mike Lyle
2008-07-10 11:08:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Richard Bollard
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 08:42:09 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Richard Bollard
Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them
if I looked. Chicken is everywhere.
Depends what you mean by pieces. I see turkey breast and turkey leg
available in just about every Coles and Woollies.
Maybe I should look then. It just seems that turkey recipes abound in
some British cookbooks I have browsed through and also Jamie Oliver
found lots of turkey being fed to kiddies in school dinners. Things
like turkey chops and turkey medallions and all sorts of cuts. Struck
me as unusual so I thought I would ask here.
See if you can get it diced: it's still visibly meaty, but also visibly
low-fat. Makes very good curries and such. (Not that anybody with my
pretensions to green credentials should be seen dead buying ordinary
commercial turkey ...) Also good for low-fat curry are the drumsticks
sold separately over here for a quid each, but they take a few minutes'
work to prep.
--
Mike.
Robin Bignall
2008-07-10 21:16:57 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 12:08:38 +0100, "Mike Lyle"
Post by Mike Lyle
Post by Richard Bollard
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 08:42:09 +0800, Robert Bannister
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Richard Bollard
Turkey is eaten over here but mainly as a roast fowl. I haven't seen
very many pieces for sale in shops but I'm sure I could find them
if I looked. Chicken is everywhere.
Depends what you mean by pieces. I see turkey breast and turkey leg
available in just about every Coles and Woollies.
Maybe I should look then. It just seems that turkey recipes abound in
some British cookbooks I have browsed through and also Jamie Oliver
found lots of turkey being fed to kiddies in school dinners. Things
like turkey chops and turkey medallions and all sorts of cuts. Struck
me as unusual so I thought I would ask here.
See if you can get it diced: it's still visibly meaty, but also visibly
low-fat. Makes very good curries and such. (Not that anybody with my
pretensions to green credentials should be seen dead buying ordinary
commercial turkey ...) Also good for low-fat curry are the drumsticks
sold separately over here for a quid each, but they take a few minutes'
work to prep.
So they're still a quid apiece. Not much inflation there in five or
more years.
--
Robin
(BrE)
Herts, England
Mike Lyle
2008-07-10 21:41:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robin Bignall
On Thu, 10 Jul 2008 12:08:38 +0100, "Mike Lyle"
[...turkey...]
Post by Robin Bignall
Post by Mike Lyle
See if you can get it diced: it's still visibly meaty, but also
visibly low-fat. Makes very good curries and such. (Not that anybody
with my pretensions to green credentials should be seen dead buying
ordinary commercial turkey ...) Also good for low-fat curry are the
drumsticks sold separately over here for a quid each, but they take
a few minutes' work to prep.
So they're still a quid apiece. Not much inflation there in five or
more years.
I was being imprecise, but that's broadly true. IIRC, 99p until about a
month ago, now quite suddenly £1.25. I do try to stick to free-range,
though, and these aren't; so I only buy any bit of turkey once a month
or so.
--
Mike.
R H Draney
2008-07-02 17:42:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? The plot thickens...
Think panko....

When it's done to shrimp, shredded coconut is often used instead of bread....r
--
What good is being an executive if you never get to execute anyone?
Barbara Bailey
2008-07-02 17:45:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Django Cat
Post by Barbara Bailey
Post by Django Cat
AmE 'breading' = BrE 'stuffing'?
No, crumb coating or batter-coating.
Could be batter, then? The plot thickens...
Can be. "Breaded shrimp" particularly, is likely to be battered as much as
it's breaded; a thin batter is used to hold on the crumbs rather than the
egg or milk wash Roland mentioned.
Continue reading on narkive:
Loading...