Discussion:
The house of the rising sun
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Harrison Hill
2018-10-05 21:03:14 UTC
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I guess the only blues record to have made it to the top of the charts
is well attested, This one must have come close though: "Tell your children
not to do what I have dome".


Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-10-06 15:59:36 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
I guess the only blues record to have made it to the top of the charts
is well attested, This one must have come close though: "Tell your children
not to do what I have dome".
http://youtu.be/0sB3Fjw3Uvc
And that relates to English usage how?

Isn't there a usenet group called alt.random.thoughts.morons somewhere?
--
athel
Harrison Hill
2018-10-09 09:11:40 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
I guess the only blues record to have made it to the top of the charts
is well attested, This one must have come close though: "Tell your children
not to do what I have dome".
http://youtu.be/0sB3Fjw3Uvc
And that relates to English usage how?
Isn't there a usenet group called alt.random.thoughts.morons somewhere?
You tell me.

"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>

The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>

...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-09 10:55:30 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Harrison Hill
I guess the only blues record to have made it to the top of the charts
is well attested, This one must have come close though: "Tell your children
not to do what I have dome".
http://youtu.be/0sB3Fjw3Uvc
And that relates to English usage how?
Isn't there a usenet group called alt.random.thoughts.morons somewhere?
You tell me.
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
Because one is a song with no known author, predating the 20th
Century, and found in the Appalachian folk tradition, and the other
was written by Howlin Wolf, a noted blues performer, incorporating
several well known blues themes and motifs, in 1961? Just a guess,
obviously!
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-09 15:02:28 UTC
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...
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
Because one is a song with no known author, predating the 20th
Century, and found in the Appalachian folk tradition, and the other
was written by Howlin Wolf, a noted blues performer, incorporating
several well known blues themes and motifs, in 1961? Just a guess,
obviously!
Do themes and motifs include chord progressions?
--
Jerry Friedman
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-09 15:31:09 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
Because one is a song with no known author, predating the 20th
Century, and found in the Appalachian folk tradition, and the other
was written by Howlin Wolf, a noted blues performer, incorporating
several well known blues themes and motifs, in 1961? Just a guess,
obviously!
Do themes and motifs include chord progressions?
Obviously!
RHDraney
2018-10-09 12:14:04 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
And what are we to make of "In The Pines" (aka "Where Did You Sleep Last
Night?" aaka "Black Girl") as recorded that same year by The Four
Pennies?...r
Harrison Hill
2018-10-09 15:35:34 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
And what are we to make of "In The Pines" (aka "Where Did You Sleep Last
Night?" aaka "Black Girl") as recorded that same year by The Four
Pennies?...r
I don't remember that song at all, but I see it only made 20 in the UK
top twenties - of which there were many. Thanks for recommending it
however, because - thanks to the power of YouTube - Leadbelly singing
"House of the Rising Sun"; which sure sounds like blues to my
notoriously "tin ear".



By the by, some female singers I've never heard of either: "Sweet"
Emma Barrett? Really and truly?



Wanda Jackson "Hard Headed Woman" rock & roll.


Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-10-09 15:57:12 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by RHDraney
Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
And what are we to make of "In The Pines" (aka "Where Did You Sleep Last
Night?" aaka "Black Girl") as recorded that same year by The Four
Pennies?...r
I don't remember that song at all, but I see it only made 20 in the UK
top twenties - of which there were many. Thanks for recommending it
however, because - thanks to the power of YouTube - Leadbelly singing
"House of the Rising Sun"; which sure sounds like blues to my
notoriously "tin ear".
But sounds like Appalachian folk to anyone else. cf. the Carter Family
Post by Harrison Hill
http://youtu.be/y5tOpyipNJs
By the by, some female singers I've never heard of either: "Sweet"
Emma Barrett? Really and truly?
Does YouTube lie?
Peter Moylan
2018-10-10 02:16:50 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
But sounds like Appalachian folk to anyone else. cf. the Carter Family
I first heard of the Carter Family while trying to learn the song "Will
the Turtle be unbroken".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mack A. Damia
2018-10-10 02:43:53 UTC
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On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 13:16:50 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
But sounds like Appalachian folk to anyone else. cf. the Carter Family
I first heard of the Carter Family while trying to learn the song "Will
the Turtle be unbroken".
"Daddy sang bass (mama sang tenor)"
RHDraney
2018-10-10 07:52:03 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Wed, 10 Oct 2018 13:16:50 +1100, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
But sounds like Appalachian folk to anyone else. cf. the Carter Family
I first heard of the Carter Family while trying to learn the song "Will
the Turtle be unbroken".
"Daddy sang bass (mama sang tenor)"
Suspiciously similar to "The One on the Right Is on the Left"....r
RHDraney
2018-10-09 15:58:34 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by RHDraney
Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
And what are we to make of "In The Pines" (aka "Where Did You Sleep Last
Night?" aaka "Black Girl") as recorded that same year by The Four
Pennies?...r
I don't remember that song at all, but I see it only made 20 in the UK
top twenties - of which there were many. Thanks for recommending it
however, because - thanks to the power of YouTube - Leadbelly singing
"House of the Rising Sun"; which sure sounds like blues to my
notoriously "tin ear".
http://youtu.be/y5tOpyipNJs
By the by, some female singers I've never heard of either: "Sweet"
Emma Barrett? Really and truly?
http://youtu.be/xhtG5YrQ-lY
Wanda Jackson "Hard Headed Woman" rock & roll.
http://youtu.be/pzJ3hiqsi0U
Global Texan Chronicles (of Leipzig!) had an article three years ago
that traced just a small part of the song's history...it seems to lend
itself to a lot of different categories (folk, rock-n-roll, blues, even
bluegrass)...the article, with three of the four linked YouTube files
still working is at

http://globaltexanchronicles.com/black-girl-in-the-pines-where-did-you-sleep-last-night-2/

Check out the Bill Monroe version...then hear Long John Baldry (one of a
bare handful of white Brits who can get away with singing the blues) and
Maggie Bell:



....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-10-09 16:37:48 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by RHDraney
Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
And what are we to make of "In The Pines" (aka "Where Did You Sleep Last
Night?" aaka "Black Girl") as recorded that same year by The Four
Pennies?...r
I don't remember that song at all, but I see it only made 20 in the UK
top twenties - of which there were many. Thanks for recommending it
however, because - thanks to the power of YouTube - Leadbelly singing
"House of the Rising Sun"; which sure sounds like blues to my
notoriously "tin ear".
http://youtu.be/y5tOpyipNJs
Odetta did it -- sublimely -- at her Governors Island appearance, in summer 2007. She entered the stage in a wheelchair and transferred
easily to a stool. At the end of the event, the crowd couldn't enter
the first ferry until the van carrying her had boarded.

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x2i353

The set was an hour and a half (see description below the video);
presumably the rest of it is also posted. Slightly shorter clips
are at YouTube, which will offer additional extracts.

She was scheduled to perform at Obama's first inaugural but did not live
until January 2009.
Post by Harrison Hill
By the by, some female singers I've never heard of either: "Sweet"
Emma Barrett? Really and truly?
http://youtu.be/xhtG5YrQ-lY
Wanda Jackson "Hard Headed Woman" rock & roll.
http://youtu.be/pzJ3hiqsi0U
bill van
2018-10-09 21:22:23 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by Harrison Hill
"The House of the Rising Sun" is a traditional folk song, sometimes
called "Rising Sun Blues".... As a traditional folk song recorded by
an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock
hit".
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_House_of_the_Rising_Sun>
The Rolling Stones...In 1964...recorded "Little Red Rooster"...Their
rendition..became a number one record in the UK and continues
to be the only blues song to reach the top of the British chart.
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Red_Rooster>
...are inconsistent. Why would one be "blues" and the other "folk
rock"?
And what are we to make of "In The Pines" (aka "Where Did You Sleep
Last Night?" aaka "Black Girl") as recorded that same year by The Four
Pennies?...r
Bluegrass inventor Bill Munroe and bluesman Leadbelly recorded In the
Pines in the 1940s and '50s, but
I think it's likely an Appalachian song from well before that. I
noticed it when the American character
in the Netflix series Ripper Street sang it as a lullaby. The first
season of the series was set in 1889.
It could have been an anachronism, but Ripper Street was usually
careful with its timelines.

All kinds of people have recorded it since Munro and Leadbelly, Kurt
Cobain among them.
It can be a gentle lullaby or quite a threatening song sung by a
jealous lover or father.

bill
Jerry Friedman
2018-10-10 01:26:00 UTC
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...
Post by bill van
Post by RHDraney
And what are we to make of "In The Pines" (aka "Where Did You Sleep
Last Night?" aaka "Black Girl") as recorded that same year by The Four
Pennies?...r
Bluegrass inventor Bill Munroe
Monroe
Post by bill van
and bluesman Leadbelly recorded In the
Pines in the 1940s and '50s, but
I think it's likely an Appalachian song from well before that. I
noticed it when the American character
in the Netflix series Ripper Street sang it as a lullaby. The first
season of the series was set in 1889.
It could have been an anachronism, but Ripper Street was usually
careful with its timelines.
...

An early version was published in 1917 by Cecil Sharp, according to
the Wikiparticle, which has a fair amount about the song's early
history.
--
Jerry Friedman
Bill Day
2018-10-10 14:33:16 UTC
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On Fri, 5 Oct 2018 14:03:14 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
I guess the only blues record to have made it to the top of the charts
is well attested, This one must have come close though: "Tell your children
not to do what I have dome".
http://youtu.be/0sB3Fjw3Uvc
For more than you ever wanted to know, ask the question at
Mudcat.org......or, just browse here.
https://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=71160 (10 other threads noted
at the top. Mudcat has been one of the major folk/blues discussion
places since 1996.)
--
remove nonsense for reply
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