Discussion:
Umami
(too old to reply)
Arcadian Rises
2013-03-02 21:18:09 UTC
Permalink
I'd like to share my newly acquired knowledge with other ignoramus
like myself (apologies to the well informed)

There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy taste)
was news to me. Although I can distinguish many different tastes, I
didn't know that umami is a basic taste.
And I don't agree that umami is more basic than the hot taste of
wasabi or jalapeno.

I'm curious about what the connoisseur have to say.
Joe Fineman
2013-03-02 22:36:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Post by Arcadian Rises
Although I can distinguish many different tastes, I didn't know that
umami is a basic taste.
I presume the idea is that it has its own taste buds.
Post by Arcadian Rises
And I don't agree that umami is more basic than the hot taste of
wasabi or jalapeno.
I *think* the reason peppery sensations are not called taste in the
narrow sense is that they are actually phony heat sensations -- they
make use of the heat-sensitive cells, tho they don't use heat.

Of course, in ordinary life, as is well known, "taste" takes in a good
deal more, including the smell of what is in your mouth.
--
--- Joe Fineman ***@verizon.net

||: Cynicism may be an aid to charity. :||
Garrett Wollman
2013-03-02 23:36:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate". It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | What intellectual phenomenon can be older, or more oft
***@bimajority.org| repeated, than the story of a large research program
Opinions not shared by| that impaled itself upon a false central assumption
my employers. | accepted by all practitioners? - S.J. Gould, 1993
Adam Funk
2013-03-03 21:01:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate". It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
--
Civilization is a race between catastrophe and education.
[H G Wells]
Leslie Danks
2013-03-03 21:27:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate". It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
Probably the cause of Italian Restaurant Syndrome.
--
Les
James Silverton
2013-03-03 21:50:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate". It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
Probably the cause of Italian Restaurant Syndrome.
By the way, there have recently been reports that you can *taste*
fattiness for one more basic taste. It might be a factor in the appeal
of fried food.
--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
Leslie Danks
2013-03-03 22:21:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Silverton
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate". It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
Probably the cause of Italian Restaurant Syndrome.
By the way, there have recently been reports that you can *taste*
fattiness for one more basic taste. It might be a factor in the appeal
of fried food.
It was always claimed (FSVO always) that it was the fat content that gave
meat its flavour. I love fat, especially cooked and crispy, and much prefer
streaky bacon to back. Perhaps I have the "fat-flavour" gene.
--
Les
Arcadian Rises
2013-03-04 02:02:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by James Silverton
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate".  It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
Probably the cause of Italian Restaurant Syndrome.
By the way, there have recently been reports that you can *taste*
fattiness for one more basic taste. It might be a factor in the appeal
of fried food.
It was always claimed (FSVO always) that it was the fat content that gave
meat its flavour. I love fat, especially cooked and crispy, and much prefer
streaky bacon to back. Perhaps I have the "fat-flavour" gene.
--
Les- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I have fat cravings more often than sweet cravings. I've just drank a
glass of half-and-half, not the fat free type. Actually I abhor the
words "fat free".

Ever since I found out that fat is one of the most important nutrient
for brain, I gave free reign to my fat cravings, guilt-free.
Leslie Danks
2013-03-04 09:46:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arcadian Rises
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by James Silverton
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate". It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
Probably the cause of Italian Restaurant Syndrome.
By the way, there have recently been reports that you can *taste*
fattiness for one more basic taste. It might be a factor in the appeal
of fried food.
It was always claimed (FSVO always) that it was the fat content that gave
meat its flavour. I love fat, especially cooked and crispy, and much
prefer streaky bacon to back. Perhaps I have the "fat-flavour" gene.
--
Les- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I have fat cravings more often than sweet cravings. I've just drank a
glass of half-and-half, not the fat free type. Actually I abhor the
words "fat free".
I often add about 10% of double cream to a glass of milk - a sort of DIY
Goldtop.
Post by Arcadian Rises
Ever since I found out that fat is one of the most important nutrient
for brain, I gave free reign to my fat cravings, guilt-free.
There is no reason to feel guilty. The anti-fat propaganda stands on very
shaky ground.
--
Les

Praise the Lard!
Arcadian Rises
2013-03-04 16:06:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Arcadian Rises
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by James Silverton
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate".  It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
Probably the cause of Italian Restaurant Syndrome.
By the way, there have recently been reports that you can *taste*
fattiness for one more basic taste. It might be a factor in the appeal
of fried food.
It was always claimed (FSVO always) that it was the fat content that gave
meat its flavour. I love fat, especially cooked and crispy, and much
prefer streaky bacon to back. Perhaps I have the "fat-flavour" gene.
--
Les- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I have fat cravings more often than sweet cravings. I've just drank a
glass of half-and-half, not the fat free type. Actually I abhor the
words "fat free".
I often add about 10% of double cream to a glass of milk - a sort of DIY
Goldtop.
Post by Arcadian Rises
Ever since I found out that fat is one of the most important nutrient
for brain, I gave free reign to my fat cravings, guilt-free.
There is no reason to feel guilty. The anti-fat propaganda stands on very
shaky ground.
Perhaps it has some merits for people with high cholesterol, but the
jury is still out on this.
Post by Leslie Danks
--
Les
Praise the Lard!
I love it!
Leslie Danks
2013-03-04 18:24:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arcadian Rises
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Arcadian Rises
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by James Silverton
Post by Leslie Danks
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Joe Fineman
Post by Arcadian Rises
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy
taste) was news to me.
I have seen it called "savory".
Technically, it's "glutamate". It's why some things with lots of
glutamates taste "meaty" even if they have little or no actual meat.
Tomatoes: less sugar & more glumamates than most other fruits.
Probably the cause of Italian Restaurant Syndrome.
By the way, there have recently been reports that you can *taste*
fattiness for one more basic taste. It might be a factor in the
appeal of fried food.
It was always claimed (FSVO always) that it was the fat content that
gave meat its flavour. I love fat, especially cooked and crispy, and
much prefer streaky bacon to back. Perhaps I have the "fat-flavour"
gene.
--
Les- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
I have fat cravings more often than sweet cravings. I've just drank a
glass of half-and-half, not the fat free type. Actually I abhor the
words "fat free".
I often add about 10% of double cream to a glass of milk - a sort of DIY
Goldtop.
Post by Arcadian Rises
Ever since I found out that fat is one of the most important nutrient
for brain, I gave free reign to my fat cravings, guilt-free.
There is no reason to feel guilty. The anti-fat propaganda stands on very
shaky ground.
Perhaps it has some merits for people with high cholesterol, but the
jury is still out on this.
Post by Leslie Danks
--
Les
Praise the Lard!
I love it!
It's not from me (I hasten to add) and you can even get a t-shirt:

<http://www.zazzle.at/praise+the+lard+tshirts>
--
Les
the Omrud
2013-03-03 00:05:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arcadian Rises
I'd like to share my newly acquired knowledge with other ignoramus
like myself (apologies to the well informed)
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy taste)
was news to me. Although I can distinguish many different tastes, I
didn't know that umami is a basic taste.
And I don't agree that umami is more basic than the hot taste of
wasabi or jalapeno.
I'm curious about what the connoisseur have to say.
The Brits say "Marmite, dur".
--
David
Robert Bannister
2013-03-03 22:38:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by Arcadian Rises
I'd like to share my newly acquired knowledge with other ignoramus
like myself (apologies to the well informed)
There are five basic tastes: sweetness, sourness, saltiness,
bitterness, and umami. The last one enumerated, umami (a beefy taste)
was news to me. Although I can distinguish many different tastes, I
didn't know that umami is a basic taste.
And I don't agree that umami is more basic than the hot taste of
wasabi or jalapeno.
I'm curious about what the connoisseur have to say.
The Brits say "Marmite, dur".
I don't get the last word. Is it like Barad Dûr?
--
Robert Bannister
R H Draney
2013-03-04 04:51:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by the Omrud
The Brits say "Marmite, dur".
I don't get the last word. Is it like Barad Dûr?
The Brits are being defiantly non-rhotic here....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Robert Bannister
2013-03-05 00:12:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by the Omrud
The Brits say "Marmite, dur".
I don't get the last word. Is it like Barad Dûr?
The Brits are being defiantly non-rhotic here....r
Oh. Duh to me then.
--
Robert Bannister
R H Draney
2013-03-05 02:21:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by the Omrud
The Brits say "Marmite, dur".
I don't get the last word. Is it like Barad Dûr?
The Brits are being defiantly non-rhotic here....r
Oh. Duh to me then.
When I was in the upper single digits in age, "duh" was the mildest form of
"you're being obtuse"...a stronger form was "dur" (rhotic), and even more
emphatic still was "dur-REEE!", sometimes accompanied by repeatedly slapping the
chest with the side of one hand....

Now it seems that the intensified form is "hurr durr"....r
--
Me? Sarcastic?
Yeah, right.
Peter Moylan
2013-03-05 10:17:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by the Omrud
The Brits say "Marmite, dur".
I don't get the last word. Is it like Barad Dûr?
The Brits are being defiantly non-rhotic here....r
Oh. Duh to me then.
Does "duh" contain the non-rhotic "er/ir/ur" vowel? I've always read it
as /dV/, rhyming with "uh-huh". If it's really supposed to sound like
/dV"/, the "uh" spelling is about as counter-intuitive as you can get.

It makes me nuhvous whenever I discover one of these misunderstandings.
--
Peter Moylan, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. http://www.pmoylan.org
For an e-mail address, see my web page.
Robert Bannister
2013-03-06 00:21:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by R H Draney
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by the Omrud
The Brits say "Marmite, dur".
I don't get the last word. Is it like Barad Dûr?
The Brits are being defiantly non-rhotic here....r
Oh. Duh to me then.
Does "duh" contain the non-rhotic "er/ir/ur" vowel? I've always read it
as /dV/, rhyming with "uh-huh". If it's really supposed to sound like
/dV"/, the "uh" spelling is about as counter-intuitive as you can get.
It makes me nuhvous whenever I discover one of these misunderstandings.
The "duh" I always heard from my school kids was a long vowel as in
"bird", so more /dV:/ - the stupider the comment, the longer the "duh".
This is the only word I know where "uh" is a long sound and not just a
sort of grunt.

As an aside, but still about non-rhoticism:
This morning on the radio, I heard Professor Somebody-or-other
discussing his new book about plastic surgery. Talking about how some
surgery completely changes some people's life for the better, he said
"It is aw(r)ing to see". Quite apart from the fact that I have never
heard "awe" used as a verb before, the intrusive r was quite startling.
--
Robert Bannister
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