Discussion:
Cookies in BrE
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Steve Hayes
2020-11-05 10:30:36 UTC
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Question for British English speakers.

If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?

If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Kerr-Mudd,John
2020-11-05 10:36:44 UTC
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IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Jerry Friedman
2020-11-05 15:34:24 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
Random lyrics:

I gave you a brand new Ford.
You said 'I want a Cadillac.'
I bought you a ten dollar dinner.
You said 'Thanks for the snack.'
I let you live in my penthouse.
You said it was just a shack.
I gave you seven children,
And now you want to give them back.

"How Blue Can You Get", originally by Jane and Leonard Feather, but
Wikipedia tells me B. B. King added this bit.
--
Jerry Friedman
Ken Blake
2020-11-05 16:44:54 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
In AmE, a cupcake is a very small cake, perhaps two or three inches in
diameter, meant as a single serving.
--
Ken
Peter T. Daniels
2020-11-05 16:58:12 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
I wonder what Steve thinks a "cup cake" is. Cupcakes have approximately
nothing in common with cookies, besides being pleasant baked goods that
are served individually (i.e. not cut from something bigger).
Post by Ken Blake
In AmE, a cupcake is a very small cake, perhaps two or three inches in
diameter, meant as a single serving.
It's made in a pleated paper cup that sits in the well of a muffin tin.
If you poured the cake batter directly into the muffin tin, the cupcake
would stick when you tried to remove it. The paper cup is then convenient
for the server to hold it by when distributing them.

"Server" replaced "waitron" as the gender-free term. Presumably Ken
objects to it, too.
charles
2020-11-05 17:15:25 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
I wonder what Steve thinks a "cup cake" is. Cupcakes have approximately
nothing in common with cookies, besides being pleasant baked goods that
are served individually (i.e. not cut from something bigger).
Post by Ken Blake
In AmE, a cupcake is a very small cake, perhaps two or three inches in
diameter, meant as a single serving.
It's made in a pleated paper cup that sits in the well of a muffin tin.
If you poured the cake batter directly into the muffin tin, the cupcake
would stick when you tried to remove it. The paper cup is then convenient
for the server to hold it by when distributing them.
Just like the cupcakes in the UK
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Server" replaced "waitron" as the gender-free term. Presumably Ken
objects to it, too.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter T. Daniels
2020-11-05 17:41:43 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
I wonder what Steve thinks a "cup cake" is. Cupcakes have approximately
nothing in common with cookies, besides being pleasant baked goods that
are served individually (i.e. not cut from something bigger).
Post by Ken Blake
In AmE, a cupcake is a very small cake, perhaps two or three inches in
diameter, meant as a single serving.
It's made in a pleated paper cup that sits in the well of a muffin tin.
If you poured the cake batter directly into the muffin tin, the cupcake
would stick when you tried to remove it. The paper cup is then convenient
for the server to hold it by when distributing them.
Just like the cupcakes in the UK
So the problem might arise in SAfE (or maybe Southern Hemisphere E,
if PM and Ross offer data).
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Server" replaced "waitron" as the gender-free term. Presumably Ken
objects to it, too.
Steve Hayes
2020-11-05 17:01:48 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
In AmE, a cupcake is a very small cake, perhaps two or three inches in
diameter, meant as a single serving.
I know what they are, I just want to know if anyone in the UK (or
elsewhere outside the US) calls them "cookies".
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Ken Blake
2020-11-05 17:50:16 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
IQuestion for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I'm a bit vague as to the edge cases for American "cookie" and would call a
cup cake a cupcake. But the US may vary on their definition of cup cake as
well, and as the proferer is non-US there's a lot of room for confusion, so
I'd probably say "Thanks for the snack".
In AmE, a cupcake is a very small cake, perhaps two or three inches in
diameter, meant as a single serving.
I know what they are,
OK, sorry if I misunderstood you.
Post by Steve Hayes
I just want to know if anyone in the UK (or
elsewhere outside the US) calls them "cookies".
--
Ken
Witziges Rätsel
2020-11-05 14:05:15 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what
would you expect?
I'd expect a cookie.
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would
you say, "That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
No, I'd say, "No thanks! I abhor cup cakes."
Steve Hayes
2020-11-05 17:08:00 UTC
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2020 09:05:15 -0500, Witziges Rätsel
Post by Witziges Rätsel
Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what
would you expect?
I'd expect a cookie.
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would
you say, "That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
No, I'd say, "No thanks! I abhor cup cakes."
Well, it seems that people on Facebook are more knowledgeable than
people on Usenet, since several people there have told me that the BrE
usage is "fairy cakes", but no one here seems to know.

No wonder Usenet is dead since everyone seems to have migrated to
Facebook.
--
Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
Web: http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
Blog: http://khanya.wordpress.com
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Kerr-Mudd,John
2020-11-05 20:04:54 UTC
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On Thu, 5 Nov 2020 09:05:15 -0500, Witziges RÀtsel
Post by Witziges Rätsel
Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what
would you expect?
I'd expect a cookie.
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would
you say, "That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
No, I'd say, "No thanks! I abhor cup cakes."
Well, it seems that people on Facebook are more knowledgeable than
people on Usenet, since several people there have told me that the BrE
usage is "fairy cakes", but no one here seems to know.
No wonder Usenet is dead since everyone seems to have migrated to
Facebook.
Perhaps us remnants are'nt particulary well-versed in cake variety names.
But if you ask us about sandwiches...
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Paul Carmichael
2020-11-05 15:34:01 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
A cookie is a file planted by a website.
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
I though "cup cake" was like "sweetheart".
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/elpatio
Jerry Friedman
2020-11-05 15:38:13 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
Is the person a native speaker of English, by the way?
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
This American calls it a cupcake, and that spelling is much more common
in American books.

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=cup+cake%2Ccupcake&year_start=1800&year_end=2019&corpus=28&smoothing=3#
--
Jerry Friedman
Janet
2020-11-05 17:43:29 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
annoying pop up adverts for biscuits
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
cupcake or fairy cake.

Janet
Peter T. Daniels
2020-11-05 17:47:36 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
annoying pop up adverts for biscuits
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
cupcake or fairy cake.
TGBBS has given the impression that your fairy cake is our petit four.
Janet
2020-11-05 20:34:34 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
annoying pop up adverts for biscuits
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
cupcake or fairy cake.
TGBBS has given the impression that your fairy cake is our petit four.
they aren't.

Janet
Peter T. Daniels
2020-11-05 20:43:29 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Janet
Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
annoying pop up adverts for biscuits
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
cupcake or fairy cake.
TGBBS has given the impression that your fairy cake is our petit four.
they aren't.
Mudd's link shows some rather chintzy cupcakes with a lot of froufrou
on top.

Either not enough batter was poured into the cups, or it didn't rise
properly.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2020-11-05 20:06:43 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
annoying pop up adverts for biscuits
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
cupcake or fairy cake.
Janet
A fairy cake, as opposed to a cup cake, IM limited E has to have wings.
YMMV.
https://keyassets-p2.timeincuk.net/wp/prod/wp-
content/uploads/sites/53/2018/04/Rachel-Allens-fairy-cakes.jpg
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Quinn C
2020-11-05 23:41:37 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Janet
Post by Steve Hayes
Question for British English speakers.
If someone who wasn't American offered you a cookie, what would you
expect?
annoying pop up adverts for biscuits
Post by Steve Hayes
If they offered you what Americans call a "cup cake", would you say
"That's not a cookie, that's a _______."
cupcake or fairy cake.
Janet
A fairy cake, as opposed to a cup cake, IM limited E has to have wings.
YMMV.
https://keyassets-p2.timeincuk.net/wp/prod/wp-
content/uploads/sites/53/2018/04/Rachel-Allens-fairy-cakes.jpg
The Internet tells me that
- the winged ones are primarily called butterfly cakes
- fairy cakes are named for their size.

<https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/butterfly-cakes>
<https://www.huffpost.com/entry/fairy-cakes-what-are-they_n_2638673>
<http://justfunfacts.com/interesting-facts-about-cupcakes/>
--
Somebody, your father or mine, should have told us that not many
people have ever died of love. But multitudes have perished, and
are perishing every hour [...] for the lack of it.
-- James Baldwin, Giovanni's Room
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